November 2008

The Phillies have just announced the men who will be working with Amaro in the front office.

GM Amaro makes front-office moves

Looper takes on Arbuckle’s responsibilities; LaMar promoted

Looper will assume Arbuckle’s responsibilities in the scouting and player development realm, and will be assisted by Chuck LaMar, who has been promoted to assistant GM, player development and scouting.

Amaro said Friday that he plans to interview candidates for an assistant general manager — essentially to replace himself — in the next few weeks. He said he has “about four or five candidates,” and that the position will be filled from outside the organization.

Looper, the uncle of free-agent pitcher Braden Looper, will oversee player personnel in his role as assistant GM. He worked closely with Pat Gillick during their years together with the Mariners.

The 60-year-old had spent the previous 23 years with Seattle in many capacities at the Major and Minor League levels, including most recently as vice president of player personnel (2006-08), VP of player development and scouting (2003-06) and VP of player development (2002-03).

LaMar will manage the player development department, working closely with Minor League director Steve Noworyta and scouting director Marti Wolever, and will also cross-check at the amateur and professional levels. The 52-year-old joined the Phillies in October 2007 and spent the past season as the director of professional scouting. Before joining the Phillies, LaMar spent a year with the Washington Nationals as special assistant to GM Jim Bowden and 10 years as the GM of the Tampa Bay Rays (1995-2006).

Dallas Green (senior advisor to the GM), Charley Kerfeld (special assistant to the GM), Gordon Lakey (director, Major League scouting), Noworyta (director, Minor League operations) and Wolever (director, scouting) are all staying with the organization in their current positions. Gillick is also remaining with the club in an advisory role. (H/T Phillies.com)

Okay, guys, here’s the deal, work to get this team to repeat as a World Champ and you’ll get the fans to love you forever after. Do not mess this up too badly like management has done in the past.

The latest MLBlog.com leader board is up, and at no. 10 among the top 50 MLB fan blogs is….Phillies Red Pinstripes.

Latest Leaders Oct. 30-Nov. 6

Here are the most popular blogs by page view from the day after the World Series until now. Visit them and leave a thoughtful comment with your full URL, and voila, instant traffic.

MLB PRO BLOGS

1. Hot Stove Blog 10x runnerup, 100x top fan blog, a must RSS for ANY blogger
2. Shane Victorino’s Postseason Blog
3. Bombers Beat
4. Inside the Dodgers
5. The Max *
6. Carlos Pena’s Postseason Blog
7. Mets in the AFL
8. The Baseball Collector
9. Brownie Points
10. Down the Line with the Phillies Ballgirls
11. CastroTurf
12. *touch* ‘em all
13. The Pulse
14. October Gonzo
15. Braves in the AFL
16. Yankees in the AFL
17. Beck’s Blog
18. Red Sox in the AFL
19. Phillies Insider
20. Newberg Report
21. Major League Bastian
22. Around the Horn in KC
23. Obviously, You’re Not a Golfer
24. Tommy Lasorda’s World
25. Giants in the AFL
26. Red Sox Insider Blog
27. Ryan Braun’s Postseason Blog
28. Dining with ‘Dre
29. MLB.com’s Fantasy 411
30. Postcards from Elysian Fields
You’ll like: Bally’s Blog | Kala’s Island Adventure
* Created for the YES Network

FAN MLBLOGS

1. All Baseball All The Time
2. Phillies Phollowers
3. Red State Blue State
4. The Rumor Mill – MLB Rumors
5. Confessions of a She-Fan
6. Prince of New York
7. Rays Renegade
8. Angry Fan’s Baseball Fix
9. FutureAngels.com
10. Phillies Red Pinstripes
11. How ‘Bout Them Phillies?!
12. Hardball
13. The Closer
14. daisygrace **
15. THE BOSTON RED SOX BLOG
16. Blogging Dodgers and Baseball
17. Statistician Magician
18. Love of The Game: Through 2 Different Pairs of Eyes
19. MLB Nation
20. Rockpile Rant…Postseason
21. Unfinished Business
22. MLBWhiz
23. Cambios y Curvas
24. District Boy
25. jimmy
26. DYNASTY League Baseball from designer of Pursue the Pennant
27. The ‘Burgh Blues
28. Baseball, The Yankees, and Life
29. Bruce Markusen’s Cooperstown Confidential
30. Yogi Brewer
31. True men drink Oldstyle
32. Big Talk From Last Place
33. The Yankee Wire (Rumors, News, Etc.)
34. Rockpile Rant
35. Pick Me Up Some Mets!
36. Big Pupi- Baseball Dog Blogger
37. MLB in the eyes of a 13 year old
38. LA NACION MEDIAS ROJAS
39. Pittsburgh Pirates – Bucco Blog
40. Red Sox Hen
41. The Brewer Nation
42. Sports Propaganda
43. Taking Home A Piece Of The Game
44. Red Sox Ramblings
45. Braves World
46. Mike Thrilla
47. sittingstill
48. (Transplanted) Nation
49. A Boston Red Sox Blog
50. Diamondhacks
** on the strength of one paragraph that included a reference to “Mark McGraw” (H/T MLBlogs.com)

 
To say I that I am surprised to see my blog finally hit the top 10 among the top 50 fan blogs listed at MLB.Blogs is a real understatement. I would like to thank everyone who has been reading, and especially commenting on, my blog. And, look, seems like that I’m not the only Phillies’ pinstripes related blog listed in both the Pro and Fan catagories. Nice to know that I have company here. :)

Phillies World Series Artifacts are head for the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.

World Series artifacts heading to Hall

Hamels’ jersey, Upton’s spikes to be featured in Cooperstown

By Mark Newman / MLB.com

And the series will now be commemorated for all time at the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

PHILADELPHIA — The 104th World Series will be memorable for many reasons — from the mere presence of the Amazin’ Rays to the unprecedented 46-hour suspension of play to the long-awaited celebration of a major sports championship in Philadelphia and the gathering of long-suffering fans on Broad Street.

Fittingly, it is being commemorated for generations of fans to come at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y. Many artifacts that were used in this Fall Classic were donated by humbled players after the Phillies’ 4-3 clinching victory over Tampa Bay on Wednesday night at Citizens Bank Park. Those items will go on display at the Hall of Fame in mid-November. They include:

• Cole Hamels’ No. 35 home pinstriped jersey that he wore in Game 5: Hamels was 4-0 in the postseason and was named World Series MVP.

“That’s something I never expected,” he said, wearing the jersey underneath two layers of shirts during the clubhouse celebration. “It’s a tremendous experience and an honor for them to want to take something from me. This whole fifth game will be a trivia question for the next 100 years, and I get to be a part of it.”

• Jayson Werth’s spikes: His single in the bottom of the sixth, right after play resumed, drove in pinch-hitter Geoff Jenkins to give Philadelphia a temporary 3-2 lead. He also stole three bags in the series, including one in Game 5.

“Gosh, what an honor,” Werth said on the Citizens Bank Park field, as players celebrated there with family, friends and fellow Phillies personnel. “I mean, really, step back and think about that. I come from a long line of baseball players, and I’m thankful to them. My grandfather was a ballplayer. My stepdad [Dennis Werth] played in the big leagues. We’re just baseball players, not Hall of Famers. For me to have something go there to Cooperstown, that’s unbelievable.”

• Joe Blanton’s bat that he used to hit the fabled home run in Game 4: It marked the first time since Ken Holtzman of Oakland in 1974 that a pitcher homered in the World Series.

“As a pitcher, it’s not what you expect,” Blanton said. “Very possibly the last thing you expect. But just to have a piece of your playing equipment go to the Hall of Fame is so special. Not every player can say he has something there.”

Blanton said he has not been to Cooperstown, and this will nudge him in that direction.

“Now, I have another good reason,” he said. “One of those things I’ve never been able to do for whatever reason. But I grew up in a baseball family and definitely will go now.”

• Ryan Howard’s bat used in Game 5: The 2008 National League MVP candidate busted out just in time during this postseason, hitting two homers in Game 4 to give him three long balls in the World Series.

“That would be cool,” he said with a big grin, shortly after Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson received his permission to take the lumber back to Cooperstown.

• Eric Bruntlett’s cap: He broke up a Game 2 shutout with a solo homer off rookie David Price in the eighth inning at Tropicana Field during the Rays’ 4-2 victory. But his most memorable moment in this Fall Classic came when he scored the winning run on Carlos Ruiz’s 30-foot walk-off chopper in Game 3, giving Philly the World Series lead for keeps. Bruntlett also scored the go-ahead run on Pedro Feliz’s RBI single in the clincher on Wednesday.

“We had a lot of good fortune that inning,” Bruntlett said that night. “It’s one of those deals where it feels like it’s in slow motion. I feel like I should be moving faster, but can’t. You want to get there so quickly. It feels like a long 90 feet.”

• Ruiz’s helmet: It’s what he was wearing when he mashed that ball into the ground to put the perfect ending to Game 3 for Phillies faithful. This was the World Series when a lot of baseball fans got to know more about the catcher from Panama.

“We were so hungry for this, we wanted this title,” Ruiz said. “I want to thank Panama for supporting me and the Phillies all year long. I want all of Panama to enjoy this with me. This was a great season and a great organization. This is for all of us.”

• The cap Brad Lidge wore in Game 5 when he saved the Series-clinching win for the Phillies.

• B.J. Upton’s spikes and Joe Maddon’s flap-cap: Upton had four steals in the World Series, including the one on the mud going into second base just before the Game 5 suspension on Monday, and the Rays wound up with a postseason-record 25 steals. Maddon managed the Rays from a 2007 last-place finish into a World Series team, and that flap-cap became a much-discussed piece of headwear in this cold, final week of the 2008 baseball season. Consider this a Cooperstown tip of the cap.

“I thought we presented ourselves really well,” Maddon said. “And I think all this country now knows who we are, as well as the world, the baseball world.” (H/T baseballhalloffame.org)

Interesting choices of some of the equipment that they plan to put on display. I wonder how many of the players will later be joining as members? Makes you wonder, doesn’t it?

Correction: The writer of the article, Mr. Newman, has just informed me in the comments section that the bat that Howard gave to the Hall should be listed as from Game 4, not 5. 

Phillies receives some more awards: Rollins and Victorino receives Gold Gloves.

Rollins, Victorino snare Gold Gloves

Shortstop wins second award; outfielder first-time recipient

Ask Victorino about one of his prouder moments from that game, however, and he’ll likely start with the “F8″ that retired Casey Blake — a leaping grab against the wall that preserved a lead, keeping the Phillies in control.

For efforts like that, which came with two outs and two on, Victorino earned his first of what could many Rawlings Gold Glove Awards. He and teammate Jimmy Rollins, who won his second straight and second overall, were named Wednesday among National League winners.

“Of course, you want to do well offensively, but I always take pride in my defense,” Victorino told ESPNews. “There’s times you’re struggling at the plate, [but] there’s never a time that you should struggle on defense. There’s no time that you feel, ‘Oh, my first step is not there, or my legs aren’t feeling good.’ At the plate, you fail more than you succeed in this game. When you go on defense, it’s about helping your team win.”

The switch-hitting Victorino was in center field for 134 of his 138 starts this season, after shifting from right to replace Aaron Rowand. He committed just two errors in 323 total chances in center field and had a .994 fielding percentage, third best after Pittsburgh’s Nate McLouth and Milwaukee’s Mike Cameron.

Victorino is the fourth Phillies outfielder to win the award, joining Rowand (2007), Bobby Abreu (2005) and Garry Maddox(1975-82). This season is the 10th time in franchise history the Phils have had multiple Gold Glove winners.

The winners were selected by managers and coaches from each NL team. Managers and coaches couldn’t vote for their own players.

The rest of the NL winners were Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina, Padres first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, Reds second baseman Brandon Phillips, Mets third baseman David Wright and outfielder Carlos Beltran, McLouth and Dodgers pitcher Greg Maddux.

One of the standard methods of constructing a winning baseball team is to secure adept defenders up the middle, typically at catcher, second base, shortstop and center field.

The World Series champions have two of those spots covered in Rollins and Victorino.

Despite missing 25 games with a sprained left ankle, Rollins paced NL shortstops in a league that contains sterling defenders Jose Reyes (Mets), J.J. Hardy (Brewers) and Miguel Tejada (Astros). This is his second successive and second overall Gold Glove.

Rollins led the NL with a .988 fielding percentage and a career-low seven errors in 593 total chances. Rollins is the first Phillies shortstop to win the award in consecutive seasons and first player to do so since Scott Rolen in 2000-01.

“It’s an honor anytime you are recognized as one of the best defensive players in the league,” Rollins said in a statement. “It’s something I work very hard at and I understand the importance of playing on both sides of the ball. I would like to thank all the managers and coaches for believing I’m one of the best.”

The 2008 season marked the 52nd year of the Gold Glove Award. The first were awarded in 1957 to one player at each position from both leagues, then expanded the next year to include a lineup of nine players, one from each league.

“It’s an honor,” Victorino said. “Growing up as a kid, you heard about guys winning Gold Gloves and being known as the best defensive player at their positions. To be awarded that is definitely a reward.” (H/T Phillies.com)

A second gold glove award for JayRoll and a first for Victorino. Both well deserved, and hopefully the beginning of many more gold gloves for both players.

Steve Smith to be let go as the Phillies’ third base coach.

Phillies let third-base coach go

Smith had been with organization for two seasons

General manager Ruben Amaro Jr. confirmed this from Dana Point, Calif., where he’s attending the General Managers Meetings. Manuel is in attendance as well, and the two men met with Smith personally to deliver the news.

Smith was hired before the start of the 2007 season, as a replacement for Art Howe, who had been hired but left to accept a position with the Rangers.

The rest of the Phillies’ coaches will be asked to return. (H/T Phillies.com)

Hopefully Charlie will have someone ready to take his place, although it is good to hear that the rest of the coaches will still be here. Goodbye Steve, and good luck in the future. 

And once again, some numbers: Phillies’ Fielding.

Here is one last set of numbers to show how the Phillies were able to win first the National League East and later the National League itself this past season. Good teams win by being able to play good defense behind their pitchers. Let’s see how well the Phillies did in the field. In a 162 games season in which they played in 1449 and two-third innings (7th), they had a team field percentage of .985, tying them with the Colorado Rockies for fifth best in the league. They had 6137 total fielding chances (7th), making 4349 put outs (7th) and 1698 assists (T-6th with Milwaukee), while committing only 90 errors (12th worst). They would turn over 142 double plays (T-9th with Houston). Their catchers would allow only 5 passed balls (T-15th worst with Milwaukee). They sadly would allow 109 stolen bases (5th) while throwing out 34 runners (9th). The team would end the season with a Defense Efficiency Rating (DER) of .7080, fifth best in the league. With these numbers, it shows that, defense wise, this was mainly a team that was either in or near the middle of the pack in most defensive categories, that did get to make many double play and was run on by the opposition, but at the same time did not commit too many errors or saw many balls get past their catchers. They also ended the season with a very high DER among the sixteen teams that played in the National League. While they could’ve done better in the field, the team’s fielding was good enough to support the team’s pitching staff, thus allowing the staff to keep the team in enough games for the offense to eventually win them.

Rudy Seanez decides to become free agent.

Phillies’ Seanez becomes free agent

Club wants to keep veterans Moyer, Eyre in fold for 2009

Seanez appeared in 42 games for the Phillies in 2008, allowing 17 earned runs, 38 hits and 25 walks in 43 1/3 innings. He notched 30 strikeouts.

Seanez was left off the 25-man roster for all three rounds of the playoffs, but the 40-year-old intends to pitch in 2009.

Philadelphia had seven free agents. They have already announced they won’t exercise the 2009 options on outfielder So Taguchi and right-hander Tom Gordon, and Gordon filed on Saturday.

That leaves left fielder Pat Burrell, left-handers Jamie Moyer and Scott Eyre and infielder Tadahito Iguchi.

On his first day as general manager, Ruben Amaro Jr. said the team had spoken to the agents of Moyer and Eyre and would like to keep both players.  (H/T Phillies.com)

As I’d said at the top, I was not expecting this situation, mostly because no one at any point during the season talking about Rudy possibly becoming a free agent after the regular season was over. With that said, although I hope the Phils can keep him in the fold. If they can’t, I wish Rudy luck if someone picks him up during the off-season. I also like the fact that Moyer and Eyre’s agents are being talked with. I hope the Phillies will soon be signing the two to new contracts. I also hope they’ll go after Tadahito Iguchi. Never can have too many good infielders.

Pat Gillick will stay with the team in an advisory role.

Gillick to remain with Phils as advisor

Amaro, Montgomery pleased to keep former GM on staff

Gillick isn’t leaving? That’s really good news.
 
PHILADELPHIA — The news got better for new Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. on Monday, when he announced that his mentor of the past three seasons wasn’t leaving.

Pat Gillick, who fulfilled a three-year commitment as general manager by constructing a World Series champion, will remain on the staff in an advisory role.

The 71-year-old Gillick will advise Amaro and team president David Montgomery on baseball matters, including amateur scouting, player development and the Major League club.

“I’m very happy that Pat has opted to stay on board,” Amaro said. “His knowledge of the game is invaluable and his innumerable resources will be a tremendous asset. There are pluses to having Pat with us and draw on his expertise.”

In 51 years in professional baseball — 27 as a general manager — Gillick has brought 11 different teams to the playoffs. He previously served as GM of the Blue Jays, Orioles and Mariners and guided Toronto to back-to-back World Series championships (1992-93).

He also worked for the Astros and Yankees in scouting and player development.

“I’m going home,” Gillick said with a laugh as Amaro and others prepared to head to California for the General Manager Meetings. Gillick also joked that his wife was worried about the additional time they may spend together.

Gillick claims to have few hobbies, so he plans to get some “work done around the house” during his down time. The rest of the time, he’ll keep an eye on the Phillies Foundation.

“This is Ruben’s day, but we’re thrilled Pat has agreed to remain with us for the foreseeable future,” said Montgomery, who had tried to persuade Gillick to say on as full-time GM. “With Pat, you never know what that means, as an advisor to Ruben and myself.”

What’s his title?

“We haven’t talked about a title,” Montgomery said. “He won’t want a title, but he’s told us he’s going to remain with us. Probably by phone, but whatever. He’s there as a resource.” (H/T Phillies.com)

This is some of the best Phillies related news that I have seen since watching the Phillies win this year’s world series. Hopefully his experience will help guide Junior until he’s fully ready to do things on his own. Thanks for deciding to stay around for a while longer, Mr. Gillick.

Ruben Amaro, Jr. takes over the reins as the Phillies’ GM as Pat Gillick retires. Mike Arbuckle resigns as Phillies’ Assistant GM of Scouting and Player Development.

Amaro Jr. takes over reins for Phillies

Longtime assistant GM, former player replaces mentor Gillick

As Amaro dug in that cloudy afternoon, Reds catcher Eddie Taubensee asked, “Aren’t you the assistant GM?” After driving in the winning run with an 11th-inning sacrifice fly, he heard Taubensee again, though not as cordial.

“He used a couple of expletives and said, ‘I can’t believe the assistant GM just beat us,'” said Amaro.

Taubensee was right. Amaro, a former Phillies bat boy, would have seven more Major League plate appearances before finishing his career with a .235 average. Shortly after, he accepted the Phillies’ assistant GM job offered to him by Ed Wade in the spring of 1998, embracing the unique and outstanding new path.

A decade later, he stood at the podium at Citizens Bank Park on Monday, having reached an ultimate new goal, shedding the assistant label and taking over as general manager of a team that won its first World Series championship in 28 years.

“I’m ready to continue the leadership that those who have preceded me have developed in Philadelphia,” Amaro said. “While our leadership is changing, our goals will remain the same, and that’s to bring championships here to Philadelphia and to win World Series. I’m looking forward to the challenge.”

Amaro replaces outgoing GM Pat Gillick, who stepped down after fulfilling a three-year contract signed before the 2006 season. Gillick steps aside amid perfect circumstances for the architect of 11 playoff teams with four different organizations, including three World Series champions.

Team president David Montgomery had hoped to persuade Gillick to reconsider his decision to leave as a full-time GM, but settled for the 71-year-old remaining in an advisory role.

“Not only is he well prepared, I believe he is extremely well qualified for this opportunity,” said Montgomery, who selected Amaro over another in-house candidate, Mike Arbuckle. “That’s evidenced by the outstanding contribution he’s made to our club since he’s joined us 10 years ago.”

Amaro’s first assignment will be to represent the Phillies at the annual General Manager’s Meetings, which began Monday in Dana Point, Calif. He was set to fly out Monday afternoon. After that, he’ll have to figure out which free agents to pursue and how to manage a budget that is expected to increase from 2008’s $104 million.

He said keeping pitchers Jamie Moyer and Scott Eyre are top priorities, and he’s already spoken to representatives for both players. Retaining outfielder Pat Burrell may be more daunting and the team is prepared for life without him.

Arbuckle, the assistant general manager of scouting and player development and a part of the organization since 1992, won’t return next season. Reached by phone Sunday, Arbuckle, 58, declined to comment, but indicated that he was prepared to move on after being passed over three times for the position.

His departure is a significant loss for the organization. Under his watch, he and scouting director Marti Wolever supervised drafts that secured Burrell, Cole Hamels, Ryan Howard, Ryan Madson, Brett Myers, Jimmy Rollins and Chase Utley, while also signing players like Carlos Ruiz out of Panama. Arbuckle also drafted the six players who landed Brad Lidge and Joe Blanton in trades.

“Clearly his work was very instrumental in getting us to the point that we were on Broad Street last Friday,” Montgomery said. “Mike’s a first-class individual, and on behalf of everybody, we wish him nothing but the best in the future.”

“He’s a very good evaluator, and knows talent,” Gillick added. “Those people are very difficult to replace.”

Amaro believed that he would be able to find a replacement for Arbuckle quickly, and said Chuck LaMar, currently the director of professional scouting, might be “elevated,” possibly taking on Arbuckle’s player development role.

Selecting an assistant will be conducted through an interview process, and Amaro suggested that person isn’t currently in the organization. Wolever and Minor Leagues director Steve Noworyta are also staying.

“There will be some shuffling in our organization,” Amaro said. “There won’t be a whole lot of changes. We don’t need a whole lot of changes frankly. We just won a World Series.”

As assistant GM, Amaro has long been speculated as the person who would succeed Gillick, who was hired in part to mentor Amaro. The 43-year-old was a full-time bat boy for the Phillies from 1981-83 and enjoyed being around Hall of Famers Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt, along with Pete Rose, Larry Bowa and Bob Boone.

Amaro, who played for the Phillies from 1992-93 and 1996-98, remembered when the idea of switching from a baseball uniform to a three-piece suit was first broached.

“I was in half uniform,” Amaro said. “I had just had a workout in Spring Training [of ’98] and was thinking, ‘I may not make this club, so I better go talk to Ed [Wade] and let him know that I want to continue in baseball.”

Amaro thought that meant helping as a coach.

“When I went to his office that day, he said, ‘I’ve not worked with an assistant. Would you consider being my assistant?’ My jaw dropped. At that point, I said, ‘I want to try and continue to play as long as I can.’ I made the club, [but I] had a terrible year. We had discussions during the course of the year about what my responsibilities would be. [I] talked to my family and said, ‘Let’s make the move. This door’s not going to be open very long, or maybe ever again.'”

Next to going to Stanford University, Amaro called that “probably the best decision I ever made.”

His rise to his new position bears that out. (H/T Phillies.com)

Congrat on your new job, junior. Please don’t mess this up. Mike, I wish you good fortune wherever you land, just as long as it isn’t at the Phillies expense. What, I’m a loyal fan, shoot me.

Looks like the 2009 Phillies will already be different than the 2008 World Champs.

Phillies decline Gordon, Taguchi

Righty reliever, now a free agent, hopes to return to club

The team exercised a $1 million buyout on Gordon, 40, instead of paying him $4.5 million in 2009, and a $150,000 buyout on the contract on Taguchi, 39, rather than a $1.25 million salary.

Gordon’s third season as a Phillies reliever ended in July due to inflammation in his right elbow that eventually required surgery. In 34 games out of the Phillies’ bullpen this year, Gordon went 5-4 with a 5.16 ERA.

After allowing five runs in a trying Opening Day appearance, the right-hander posted a 3.68 ERA in his remaining 33 appearances.

Gordon had surgery on his inflamed right elbow last month, and he said he’d like to return to Philadelphia.

Taguchi never got on track with the Phillies. He served as a backup outfielder and hit .220 (20-for-91) in 2008, mostly as a pinch-hitter. (H/T Phillies.com)

Well, looks like the 2009 is already a bit different from the Champs. I wonder who else will be gone by Spring Training, 2009?

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