Results tagged ‘ 1976 National League Eastern Division Champions ’

33 games in 31 days: Game #31: The Phils earned victory no. 100, as they defeat the Braves, 4-2.

The Phils win their 100 game of the season, hitting the 100 mark for only the third time in the franchise’s history, as they defeat the Braves, 4-2.

The Braves took the lead in the first as, with two men out, Chipper Jones hits a solo home run, his eighteenth home run of the season, giving the Braves a 1-0 lead. The Braves increased their lead in the second as, with a runner on second, and with one man out, Alex Gonzalez hits an RBI double, scoring Matt Diaz, who had earlier doubled, giving the Braves a 2-0 lead. The Phils cut the Braves’ lead in half in the fourth as, with the bases loaded, via singles by Hunter Pence and Ryan Howard, with Pence stopping at third, and a walk to Shane Victorino, moving Howard up a base, and with two men out, Placido Polanco hits an RBI single, scoring Pence, making it a 2-1 Braves’ lead, while sending Howard up to third base, and Victorino up to second base. The Phils then tied the game up at two-all in the fifth as, with one man out, Jimmy Rollins hits a solo home run, his fifteenth home run of the year. The Phils then took the lead in the sixth as, with a runner on third, and with one man out, Raul Ibanez hits an RBI single, scoring Victorino, who had just tripled, giving the Phils a 3-2 lead. The Phils added an insurance run in the eighth as, with a runner on second, and with one man out, Ibanez hits an RBI single, scoring Victorino, who had just doubled, giving the Phils a 4-2 lead. That would be the final score as Ryan Madson would collect his thirty-second save of the season with a scoreless ninth.

Cliff Lee (17-8, 2.40) got the win as he pitched six innings, giving up two runs on five hits, as he struck out six. Joe Savery collected his first hold of his career as he pitched a third of an inning, getting out the only man that he would face. Michael Stutes received his thirteenth hold of the season as he pitched two-thirds of an inning, getting out both men that he would face, striking out one. Brad Lidge collected his eighth holdof the year as he pitched a scoreless inning, giving up a hit and a walk, while striking out a batter. Ryan Madson received his thirty-second save of the year as he pitched a scoreless ninth, striking out two. Randall Delgado received a no-decision as he pitched five innings, giving up two runs on five hits and a walk. Cristhian Martinez (1-3, 3.40) took the loss as he went a third of an inning, giving up a run on a hit. Eric O’Flaherty pitched an inning and two-thirds, giving up two hits, while striking out a batter. Jonny Venters pitched an inning, giving up a run on two hits, while striking out one. Anthony Varvaro pitched a 1-2-3 inning.

The Phils had ten hits in the ballgame, with Jimmy Rollins (Single, Home Run, RBI), Ryan Howard (Singles), Shane Victorino (Double, Triple) and Raul Ibanez (Singles, 2 RBIs) all leading the team with two hits each. Hunter Pence (Single) and Placido Polanco (Single, RBI) had the other two Phils’ hits, as the Phils’ offense have now collected thirty-nine hits in their last three games, while scoring sixteen runs, winning the last two games.

The Phils (100-60, 1st) will continue their series the Braves (89-71, 2nd), with a night game tonight. The game will be played at Turner Field and will start at 7:10 pm EDT. The Phils will send to the mound Roy Oswalt (8-10, 3.86), who is coming off a lost against the Nationals on September 22, as he went seven and two-thirds innings, giving up six runs on seven hits and two walks, while striking out four, in the Phils’ 6-1 lost. He will be trying to get his act together, while hoping to end the regular season with a win. The struggling Braves will counter with Derek Lowe (9-16, 4.92), who is coming off a lost to the Marlins on September 21, as he went six and one-third innings, giving up three runs on six hits and two walks, while striking out three, in the Braves’ 4-0 lost. He will be trying to keep the Braves’ Wild Card hopes alive, while hoping the Phils’ just revived offense doesn’t take him to town. The Phils will tonight be trying to tie the club’s record for most wins in a season with the 1976 and 1977 Eastern Division Champs.

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: At-Bat Champions.

During the team’s previous 127-year history, twelve Phillies players have led the National League in at-bats a total of 20 times, with four of them winning it more than once.

The first Phil to lead the NL in at-bats was Hall of Famer Sam Thompson, who would win it in 1893 with 600 at-bats. The next Phil to lead the NL would be Duff Cooley, who in 1897 ended up in a four-way tie with Gene DeMontreville of the Washington Senators, Fred Tenney of the Boston Beaneaters and George Van Haltren of the New York Giants, who all finished that year with 566 at-bats. The third Phil to lead the NL in at-bats was Eddie Grant, who would do it in two straight seasons, with 598 at-bats in 1908, and leading again in 1909 with 631 at-bats. The fourth Phil to lead the league in at-bats would do so twenty-four years later, as Chick Fullis would have the most at-bats in 1933 with 647 of them. Phils nos. five and six would be tied for the lead in 1949 as Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn and Granny Hamner would both end the season in a tie for first with 662 at-bats. The next Phil to lead the NL was Larry Bowa, who ended the 1971 season with 650 at-bats. Phil no. eight would be Dave Cash, who would lead the league in three straight years, 1974 (687), 1975 (699) and 1976 (666), helping to lead the team to the first of three NL Eastern Division pennants that year. The ninth Phil to lead the league in official at-bats would be Juan Samuel, who, like Cash, would lead the NL in three seasons, 1984 (701), 1985 (663) and 1987 (655). The next Phil to lead the league in at-bats was Lenny Dykstra, who did so in 1993, the year that the Phils won the NL pennant, with 637 at bats. The eleventh Phil to lead the league would be Doug Glanville, who would have 678 at-bats in 1998. The twelfth, and presently last, Phil to lead the NL in at-bats is Jimmy Rollins, who would lead the lead in at-bats in four different seasons, 2001 (656), 2002 (637), 2007 (716), the year that he won the MVP as he help lead the Phils to their first NL Eastern Division title since 1993 and 2009 (672), the season that the Phils would win their first back-to-back NL pennants.

During the twenty times that a Phil had led the league in officials at-bats, three had done so while tied with another player, in 1897 (4-way tie) and 1949 (2-way tie between two Phils). Phils would lead the NL twice in the 19th Century, fifteen times in the 20th Century and four times, so far, in the 21st Century. Two of the Phils to lead the league were Hall of Famers (Sam Thompson in 1893 and Richie Ashburn in 1949). Jimmy Rollins had done it the most times with four, followed by both Juan Samuel and Dave Cash, who have each done it three times, then Eddie Grant, who did it twice. The rest have done it only once. Jimmy Rollins would have the highest total of at-bats with his 716 in 2007 and Duff Cooley would have the least with his 566 official at-bats in 1897.

Who would most likely be the next Phil to lead the NL in at-bats? Most likely Jimmy Rollins, if he can keep from getting injured.

Philadelphia Phillies – Team History: 90 + wins.

In the team’s 128 years history, the Phils would win 90 games or more only fourteen times.

The team has won 100 games or more only twice in its history, as they would win 101 games twice. The first time occurred in 1976, when the team would win 101 games, losing only 61, as they would win the first of three straight NL Eastern Division titles, before losing to the World Champions Cincinnati Reds 3-0 in the NL Championship Series. They would duplicate that record the following year, 1977, as they would win their second straight NL Eastern Division crown, before falling to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the NL Championship Series, 3-1.

Their third highest victory total would be 97 games, which they would do twice. The first time would occur in 1993, when they would unexpectively win the Eastern Division that season with a record of 97-65, then win the NL title by defeating the National League Champions Braves in the NL Championship Series, 4-2, before finally falling to the World Champions Toronto Blue Jays in the World Series, 4-2. They would then duplicate the record this year as they would win their fourth straight NL Eastern Division crown, the first time that they would do that in the team’s history, before defeating the Cincinnati Reds in the NL Divisional Series, 3-0, and then losing to the San Francisco Giants in the NL Championship Series, 4-2.

The fifth best team was the 1899 Phillies, who finished that season in third place with a 94-58 record, the team’s best record for the 19th Century, ending up nine games behind the first place Brooklyn Superbas. The sixth best team was the 2009 team which finished with a record of 93-69, winning the team’s third straight Eastern Division title, doing so for the second time in the team’s history, before defeating the Colorado Rockies in the Divisional Series, 3-1, then beating the Dodgers in the NL Championship Series, 4-1, winning the team’s second straight NL title, doing so for the first time in the team’s history, before losing their World Series crown to the American League Champions New York Yankees in the World Series, 4-2.

The next two teams ended up with identical records of 92-70, giving them both the seventh best winning total. The first one was the 1964 team, the one that had the most infamous late season collapse in baseball history, until the Mets team of 2007. That team would end up being tied for second place with the Reds, a game behind the St. Louis Cardinals. The other team to win 92 games was the 2008 Phils, who would win their second straight Eastern Division title, before defeating first the Milwaukee Brewers in the NL Divisional Series, 3-1, then the Dodgers in the NL Championship Series, 4-1, and then the American League Champions Tampa Bay Rays in the World Series, 4-1, winning the team’s second World Championship.

The team with the ninth best record was the 1980 Phils, who ended the season with a record of 90-72, finishing first in the Eastern Division, before first defeating the Houston Astros in the NL Championship Series, 3-2, then defeating the American League Champions Kansas City Royal, 4-2, winning the team’s first World Championship. The tenth best team was the 1916 team which ended the season with a 91-62, finishing in second place, two and a half-games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

The eleventh team to win at least 90 games was the 1950 ‘Whiz Kid’ who won the pennant in 1950 with record of 91-63, only to lose the World Series to the World Champions Yankees, 4-0. The twelfth team was the 1915 team, which won the Phils’ first National League pennant with a record of 90-62, only to lose the World Series to the Boston Red Sox, 4-1. The final two teams would end up with identical records of 90-72. The first one was the 1978 team, which won the National League Eastern Division title, the third straight for the team, doing so for the first time in the team’s history, before losing the NL Championship Series to the National League Champions Dodgers, 3-1. The fourteenth, and final team, with 90 or more wins, was the 1983 team, nicknamed the ‘Wheeze Kids’, who would win the NL East, then defeat the Dodgers in the NL Championship Series, 3-1, before losing the World Series to the American League Champions Baltimore Orioles, 4-1.

Will the 2011 team become the fifteen team to win 90 games or more? Maybe, maybe not, but we won’t know for sure until next year comes and goes.

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: Manager of the Year Award.

With Manager of the Year, there are two different versions of the Award, one that is given by the newspaper size publication, The Sporting News, which has been awarding the prize since 1936 (to one manager in both leagues, before giving an award to a manager in each league, since 1986) and the award given by the Baseball Writers Association of America to a manager in each league since 1983. Phillie managers have won only three awards, two from the Sporting News and one from the BBWAA. They were won by two Phil managers.

The first Phillie manager to win a Manager of the Year Award was Danny Ozark, who won The Sporting News Manager of the Year Award in 1976, as he led the Phils to their first National League Eastern Division crown, and their first championship since the 1950 Whiz Kids, as the Phil won the NL East with a record of 101-61 (which is still a team record) with a .623 winning percentage. The second and, so far, only other Phil manager to win a Manager of the Year Award was Larry Bowa, who, in 2001, won both The Sporting News Manager of the Year Award and the BBWAA Manager of the Year Award, as he led the Phil to a second place finish in the NL East, the Phil’s best finish since they had finished in third place in 1999, with a record of  86-76, and a winning percentage of .531.

Phil managers have won one Manager of the Year in the 20th Century and two (both to Larry Bowa) in the 21st Century. Neither manager is in the Hall of Fame, either as a player or as a manager.

Who would be the next Phil manager to win either version of the award? I have no idea, although Charlie Manuel could win it this year, because of how the Phils won the Eastern Division pennant this past season.

Former Phillies’ manager Danny Ozark passed away today, age 85.

The Phillies had a few hours ago announced the passing of former Phillies’ manager, Danny Ozark.

According to a press release:

Danny Ozark, who ranked third for most wins among Phillies managers, died this morning at his home in Vero Beach, Fla. He was 85 years of age.

Mr. Ozark was named the Phillies manager on November 1, 1972. In his first five years, the Phillies won 71, 80, 86, 101 and 101 games. They won three consecutive National League Eastern Division titles starting in 1976, a record unmatched by any other Phillies manager. Each year, however, the Phillies missed on advancing to the World Series.

Mr. Ozark finished with a 594-510 record as Phillies manager (1973-79). His winning percentage of .538 is seventh-best in team history. He was named Manager of the Year in 1976 by the Associated Press and The Sporting News.

“Ginny and I really miss Philadelphia,” Mr. Ozark said in a Phillies Magazine story published last month. “We enjoyed our time there. That city is a great sports town. The fans are the greatest. They do express themselves, but that’s OK. We made a lot of lifelong friends there.”

Mr. Ozark began his pro career as a first baseman in the Brooklyn Dodgers system in 1942. Following a minor league career, he turned to managing in 1956, with the Dodgers’ Class B team in Wichita Falls.

Nine years later Mr. Ozark joined the Los Angeles Dodgers as a coach. After leaving the Phillies, he returned to the Dodgers as a coach (1980-82). His career ended with the San Francisco Giants as a coach (1983-84) and their interim manager in 1984 (24-32).

Born Daniel Leonard Orzechowski on November 24, 1923, in Buffalo, N.Y., he married Ginny Zdinski. The couple celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in February.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Ozark is survived by two children, Dwain and Darlene; three granddaughters; and four great-grandchildren. His hobbies included golf and following the Phillies. He was an active golfer in charity events conducted by the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association.

Funeral arrangements are pending. (H/T Phillies.com)

And another ex-Phil goes to that red pinstriped heaven in the sky. My condolences to Danny’s family. And thanks, Danny, for helping make the Phils into a contender instead of the laughing stock of baseball back in the mid-70s.

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: Triples Champions.

In the Phillies’ 126-years existance as a member of the National League, the team has won only sixteen triples championships. Ten Phils have won those sixteen titles, with four of them winning multiple titles, while one player would win it while playing for two teams and five players won the title while tied with one or more players.

The first Phil to win the triples title was Hall of Famer Ed Delahanty who won his only triples title of his fine career in 1892 with twenty-one triples. No Phil would win the triples title for the next fifty-five years. The next Phillie player to win the triples title was Harry ‘the Hat’ Walker, winning it in 1947 playing for both the St. Louis Cardinals and the Phillies, as he hit sixteen triples. Three years later, the third Phil to win the title was Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn who had fourteen triples in 1950, the year that the Phils won their second National League title. Ashburn won his second triples title in 1958 with thirteen triples. Johnny Callison became the fourth Phillie player to win the title, as he was tied with Willie Davis and Maury Wills of the Los Angeles Dodgers and Bill Virdon of the Pittsburgh Pirates, as all four men hit ten triples in 1962. Two years later, in 1964, Rookie of the Year winner Dick Allen became the fifth Phil to win the title, as he was tied with Ron Santo of the Chicago Cubs, with each man getting thirteen triples. The next year, 1965, Callison won his second triples title, this time by himself, as he hit sixteen three-baggers. In 1972, Larry Bowa won the eighth triples title won by a Phil player, the sixth Phil to do so, by hitting thirteen triples. Dave Cash became the seventh Phil to capture the triples title by getting twelve triples in 1976, the year that the Phillies won the first of their three straight National League Eastern Division titles. In 1984, Juan Samuel won the title, the eighth Phillie player to win it, as he tied with Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg of the Cubs, with each man hitting nineteen triples. Samuel won the title outright four years later in 1987, as he hit fifteen triples. In 1999, Bobby Abreu won the twelfth triples title won by a Phillie player, the ninth Phil to do so, as he tied with Neifi Perez of the Colorado Rockies, with each man hitting eleven three-baggers. The tenth and last Phil to win the triples title, Jimmy Rollins, won the first of his, so far, four triples titles by hitting twelve triples in 2001. He won his second title the following year, 2002, with ten three-baggers. Rollins won his third triples title in 2004, as he was tied with Jack Wilson of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Juan Pierre of the Florida Marlins, with all three men hitting twelve triples. Rollins won his fourth and most recent title, the sixteenth won by a Phil, in 2007, as he hit twenty triples.

Of the sixteen titles wins, only three of them were won by a Hall of Famer (Ed Delahanty (1), Richie Ashburn (2)). Jimmy Rollins has so far won the most triples titles as a Phil with four title victories, followed by Ashburn, Juan Samuel and Johnny Callison with two titles wins each. Delahanty is the Phillie player to hit the most triples while winning the title with twenty-one triples, while Johnny Callison (in 1962) and Jimmy Rollins (in 2002) both won the title with the least triples with ten of them. Callison, Dick Allen, Samuel, Bobby Abreu and Rollins each won the triples title while tied with another NL player, with Callison being involved in a four way tie in 1962 and Rollins in a three-men tie in 2004. The Phillies had one triples title win in the 19th Century, eleven in the 20th Century and so far, four triples title wins in the 21st Century.

Who will win the next triples title as a Phillie? Please, that’s a no-brainer. J-Roll, who else.

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