Results tagged ‘ 2003 ’

Pat Burrell is to officially retire as a Phil in May.

Pat Burrell, who had played left field for the Phils from 2000-2008, and was a key member of the 2008 World Series Championship team, and the Phils have announced that he will officially retire as a Phil during the team’s weekend series with the Red Sox, May 18-20, after first signing a one-day contract. Burrell, the team’s no. 1 draft pick in 1998, would spend nine seasons with the ball club, playing in a total of 1306 games, with a batting average of .257 (1166 for 4535) with an OBP of .367 and an SLG of .485. As a Phil, among his 1166 hits were 253 doubles (14th), 14 triples and 251 home runs (4th) for a total of 518 extra-base hits (9th). He would also walk 785 times (5th). Burrell would knock in 827 RBIs (8th), while scoring 655 runs. Burrell’s main claim to fame as a Phil would be him hitting a double in the bottom of the seventh inning of game five of the 2008 World Series, which would lead to the game winning run. Burrell would then become a member of the 2009-10 Blue Jays, before joining the Giants later in 2010, becoming a member of their 2010 World Series Championship team, and then a member of their 2011 squad, before being released because of an aching right foot late in the season, and then announcing his retirement after the 2011 season. During his twelve years in the Major Leagues, Burrell would appear in a grand total of 1640 games, mostly as a left fielder and a DH (Rays), accumulating a career batting average of .253 (1393 for 5503), with an OBP of .361 and an SLG of .472 for an OPS of .834. He would have a total of 299 doubles, 16 triples and 292 home runs for a total of 607 extra-base hits, while he would walk a total of 932 times. Burrell would bring in a total of 976 runs, while crossing the plate 767 times.

Brad Lidge is now a Nats as he signs a one-year, $1 million contract with the rising rival.

Yesterday, the Nationals announced that they have signed Brad Lidge, one of the heroes of the Phils’ 2008 World Series Championship team, to a one-year deal worth $1 million dollars, plus incentives. Lidge, who had joined the Phils in an off-season trade with the Houston Astros in 2007, went 48 for 48 in save opportunities during the 2008 regular and post-seasons, before striking out Eric Hinske to give the Phils the championship. Plagued by injuries during the next three seasons (2009-2011),  Lidge would pitch in four seasons for the Phils, the first three as their closer, compiling a record of 100 saves in 116 save opportunities, with a win-loss record of 3-11, as he pitched in 214 games, appearing in 203 total innings.  During the 2011 season, after coming back from injury, Lidge would perform in mainly middle relief, appearing in 25 games, pitching in 19.1 innings, as he compiled an 0-2 record with 1 save in 1 save opportunity, with a 1.40 ERA. He would strike out 23 batters while walking only 13.

Originally a member of the Astros from 2002-2007, including being a member of the 2005 National League Champs, Lidge would appear in 592 games, all but 1 in relief, compiling a career record of 26-31, with an ERA of 3.44, while saving 223 games in 266 attempts, as he pitched in 594 innings. During his career, he would strike out a total of 789 batters, while walking only 276.

So long, Brad, good luck with your new team, except when you’re pitching against the Phils, of course. :-)

Ryan Madson is now a Reds…

Ryan Madson, who had helped the team win the 2008 World Series, as well as reach the World Series in 2009, and the playoffs since 2007, is now a Red, as he had on Wednesday signed a one-year contract with the Reds worth $8.5 million dollars.

Madson, who had been a member of the Phils since 2003, began as a starter, before being placed in middle relief, than becoming the team’s eighth inning relief specialist (Bridge to Lidge), before becoming their closer last season. During his time with the Phils, he has a record of 47-30 with 52 saves in 78 save opportunities, with a career ERA of 3.59, as he played in 491 games, 18 of which as a starter (all but one in 2006), as he pitched in 630 innings. In those 491 games, he had struck out 547 batters, while walking only 191.

Congratulations on finally finding a team, Ryan. Sad to see you go. Wish you luck, except for when you’re facing the Phils.

Doc Halladay has won the 2010 NL Cy Young Award, receiving all 32 first place votes.

The BBWAA have just announced that Roy Halladay was voted the National League Cy Young Award, becoming the fifth pitcher to win the award as a pitcher in both league, as he had won the award in 2003 while pitching for the Toronto Blue Jays, joining Hall of Famer Gaylord Perry, future Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez, future Hall of Famer Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens.

Roy received all 32 first-place votes for a total of 224 points, beating out Adam Wainwright of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had received 28 second-place votes, for a total of 122 votes, and Ubaldo Jiminez, who ended third with 90 votes, including 4 second-place votes.

Roy won the votes by going 21-10 as he pitched in 33 games, all starts, as he finished first, second or third in several categories, including finishing first with the most wins in the NL (21), most complete games (9), shutouts (4) and innings pitched (250 2/3), while he finished second in strikeouts (219), behind Tim Lincecum of the San Francisco Giants, and third in ERA (2.44), behind Josh Johnson of the Florida Marlins and Wainwright. He also pitched the 20th perfect game in MLB History as he threw a no-no against the Marlins on May 29, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami, as he pitched the Phils to a 1-0 win.

Halladay became the fourth Phil to win the award, following four-time winner Hall of Famer Steve Carlton (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982), John Denny (1983), and Steve Bedrosian (1987).

Congratulations, Doc. You deserve this win.

Philadelphia Phillies – Records: Two Grand Slam Home Runs in One Game.

With the two grand slams hit by Ryan Howard and Raul Ibanez in last night’s game with the Washington Nationals, the Phillies have now been involved in four games in which they had two players each hit a grand slam home run in the same game in the organization’s 126 plus years history.

The first time that it happened was on Thursday, April 28, 1921, when Ralph Miller and Lee Meadows both hit a grand slam home runs against the Boston Braves at the Baker Bowl. The next time it would occurred was on Saturday, August 17, 1997 against the San Francisco Giants at Veterans Stadium, as Billy McMillon and Mike Lieberthal both hit a grand slam home run. The third time was on Tuesday, September 9, 2003 in Atlanta against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field, as Tomas Perez and Jason Michaels each hit a grand slam home run.

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: Home Runs Champs.

During the team’s 126-year existance as a member of the National League, the Phils would have a lot more success producing home runs hitters than they would have producing batting champs. Eight Phils would win a total of twenty-eight home runs titles, including five titles that would be shared with another National Leaguer.

The first Phillie home run champ would be Hall of Famer Sam Thompson, who would win the title in 1889 when he would hit 20 home runs. The second Phil to win the title would be Hall of Famer Ed Delahanty, who would win the crown in 1893 when he would hit 19 roundtrippers. Thompson would win the third Phillie home run title, his second as a Phil, in 1895 when he would hit 18 homers that year. The following year, 1896, would see Delahanty regain the title as he would end the season being tied with Billy Joyce, who would spend the season playing for both the Washington Nationals (II) and the New York Giants (now the San Francisco Giants), with both men hitting 13 home runs. The next Phil to win the home run title would be Gavvy Cravath, who would run off a string of home runs crowns in the 1910s, winning the title outright in 1913, 1914, 1915, 1918 and 1919, and tying with Dave Robertson of the Giants in 1917, as he would hit 19 (’13 and ’14), 24 (’15), 12 (’17), 8 (’18) and 12 (’19) home runs respectively. The next Phillie player to win the crown (title no. eleven) would be Cy Williams, who would will the title in 1920 by hitting 15 homers. He would win his second home run title as a Phil, the twelfth title for the Phillies organization, in 1923, when he would hit 41 home runs. In 1927, he would win his third Phillie title, and the fourth in his career as he had won one in 1916 as a Chicago Cubs, as he ended the season tied with Hack Wilson of the Cubs, with both men knocking out 30 roundtrippers. Hall of Famer Chuck Klein would become the fifth Phil (winning title no. fourteen) to win the home run title as he would hit 43 home runs in 1929. Two years later, in 1931, Klein would regain the crown, as he would hit 31 balls out of National League ballparks. He would win the title again in 1932, as he would be tied with Mel Ott of the Giants, with both players knocking out 38 home runs. In 1933, the year when he would win the triple crown, Klein would lead the NL in home runs with 28, winning the organization’s seventeenth home run title. It would then be forty-one years before another Phil would win the home run crown. When it finally occurred, it would be done by Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt, becoming the sixth Phil to win the crown, as he would win the title outright in 1974, 1975, 1976, 1980, 1981, 1983 and 1986 and would be tied with Dale Murphy of the Atlanta Braves in 1984, as he would hit 36 (’74), 38 (’75 and ’76), 48 (’80), 31 (’81), 40 (’83), 36 (’84) and 37 (’86) home runs, while helping to lead the organization to its first World Series title in 1980. The seventh Phillie home run champ, as he would win home run crown number twenty-sixth for the club, would be Jim Thome, as he would knock out 47 home runs in 2003. The eighth Phil to win the title would do so three years later, as Ryan Howard would knock out 58 home runs, the present Phillies’ team record for home runs hit in a season, in 2006. In 2008, Howard would capture his second home runs title, the twenty-eighth one to be won in the organization’s long existance, as he hit 48 home runs, as he helped lead the Phils to their second World Series Championship.

Oh the eight Phils to win the home run title, all but one (Jim Thome) have won the title at least twice, with Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt winning it the most times, doing it eight times in the seventies and eighties, followed by Gavvy Cravath, who would do it six times in the teens. Four of the Phils to win the title (Sam Thompson, Ed Delahanty, Chuck Klein and Mike Schmidt) are now in the Hall of Fame. Ryan Howard has hit the most home runs as a Phils’ home run champ when he knocked out 58 dingers in 2006, while Gavvy Cravath has hit the least when he hit only 8 homers back in 1918. The Phils have won four home runs titles in the 19th Century, twenty-one in the 20th and three, so far, in the 21st.

Who would be the next Phil to win the title? More than likely Ryan Howard will do it again sometime during the next few years.

Sources: Wikipedia

Still in First.

After a wild night, the Phillies would remain in first place in the National League East thanks to a two-outs, two-runs, walk off home run by Pat Burrell, which would give the Phils the victory in 10 innings against the visiting Giants, 6-5. Pat’s home run would be the third walk off home run of his career and his first since 2003. In fact, all six of the Phils run would come on two-runs homers. The first one would be hit in the bottom of the first by Chase Utley, off of Giants’ starter Pat Misch, as he hit his league leading twelfth home run of the year, knocking in Jayson Werth, who had earlier singled. The Giants’ first run of the game would come in the top of the fourth as Jose Castillo gets an RBI single off of Kyle Kendrick, knocking in Aaron Rowand, who had earlier doubled. The Phils would then increase their lead in their half of the fourth as Pedro Feliz hits his fourth roundtripper of the year, the second one of the game off of Misch, knocking in Burrell, who had earlier walked, making it 4-1 Phils. Misch would be taken out for a pitch hitter in the fifth, as he gives up four earned runs to the Fightin’s on five hits in four innings of work. In the meantime, Kendrick would keep the Giants under control until the top of the seventh, when he would give up two straight singles. Charlie Manuel would quickly replace Kendrick with Ryan Madson in an effort to end the Giants’ threat. Unfortunately, Madson would be unable to keep the Giants off the scoreboard as they would score three runs in the innings, with two of the runs being charged to Kendrick, and the other one to Madson. The Giants’ three runs would come in on an RBI single by Ray Durham, knocking in Castillo and Emmanuel Burriss, both of whom have earlier singled, and a Bengie Molina ground out, scoring Eugenio Velez, who had earlier singled. Kendrick would thus receive a no decision, as he pitched six innings and two batters, while giving up three earned runs on eighth hits, while Madson would be credited with giving up an earned run on three hits. This would also take Misch, the Giants’ starter, off the hook. Thus, for the second night in a row, the Phils would be involved in a game that would be decided by both teams’ bullpens. The Giants’ relief core of Keiichi Yabu, Vinnie Chulk, Jack Taschner, Tyler Walker and Merkin Valdez would keep the Phils off the scoreboard for five innings, giving up only one hit. Meanwhile, the Phils would counter with Tom Gordon and Brad Lidge, who would keep the Giants off the scoreboard in the eighth and ninth innings, although the Giants would come close to scoring in their top of the eighth when, with one out, and John Bowker on third, Burriss would hit a ball straight back to Gordon, with Bowker running towards home. Bowker would be caught in a run down and tagged out going back to third, while Burriss would go to second base during the run down. Gordon would then appear to have gotten hurt during the play, but he would stay in the ballgame long enough to get Velez to ground out to Eric Bruntlett to end the inning. Lidge would give up a lead off single to Fred Lewis in the ninth but would then leave him stranded. With J.C. Romero pitching for the Phils in the top of the tenth, Rowand would give the Giants the lead for the first time with one swing of the bat as he connected on the first pitch thrown by Romero, sending it into the center field seats for his third home run of the season, making the score Giants 5, Phillies 4, before Romero would end a later Giants’ threat to add a few more runs. Then, in the bottom of the tenth, with Brian Wilson pitching for the Giants, Utley would get on base on with a single with one out. After Ryan Howard is called out on strikes and is then ejected from the game for arguing the call, Burrell would step in. After getting the count to 3-2, he would slug the next pitch into the left field seats, giving the Phils the victory.

 J.C. Romero would be the winning pitcher, going one inning, giving up one earned run on three hits, upping his record to 2-0. Brian Wilson took the lost, blowing his second save opportunity, as he gives up two earned runs on two hits, while his record drops to 0-1.

In his return to Philadelphia, Rowand would go 2-5 with a double and a home run, two runs scored, and an RBI, while also striking out twice.

The next Phils’ game will be tonight at 7:05 Eastern from Citizens Bank Park. The Phillies’ (17-13) starter will be Brett Myers (2-2, 5.11) who the Phils hope will soon regain the speed on his pitches. The Giants (13-17) will counter with Matt Cain (1-2, 4.41), who has won his last start.

The victory keeps the Phils .5 games in front of both the Marlins and Mets in the National League East as both teams have won their respective games.

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