Results tagged ‘ Dick Allen ’

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: Rookie of the Year.

During the sixty-three years that the Rookie of the Year has been voted on by the Baseball Writers Associations of America (BBWAA), only four Phils have won the NL version of the award.

The first Phil to win the award was pitcher Jack Sanford in 1957 who in 33 starts complied a win-lost record of 19-8 with a 3.08 ERA, as he struck out 188 batters. The second Phil to win the award was third baseman Dick Allen in 1964, who in that year batted .318, hitting 29 home runs, 19 triples, leading the league in that category, and knocking in 91 RBIs, while scoring 125, the league leader in that category. It would be thirty-three years before another Phil would be voted the NL Rookie of the Year. Third baseman Scott Rolen would win the award in 1997, with a .283 batting average, as he hit 21 home runs, while knocking in 92 RBIs. The fourth, and presently final, Phil to win the award would be first baseman Ryan Howard in 2005, who that year batted .288, as he hit 22 home runs, while knocking in 63 RBIs.

Of the four awards won by a Phil, three were won in the 20th Century and one, so far, in the 21st. Three have been won by position players and one by a pitcher. So far, none of the award has been won by a member of the Hall of Fame, since both Rolen and Howard are still active players, although Allen is presently under consideration by the Hall of Fame Veterans’ Committee.

Who will be the next Phil to win the Award? Considering the Phils’ farm system, that is a good question, since the Phils just missed having a fifth award as J.A. Happ ended up second place in 2009.

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: On-Based Percentage Champions.

In its 128-year history as a member of the National League, the Phillies have won twenty-one on-base percentage titles. Thirteen Phils have won the title, with five of them winning it more than once.

The first Phil to win the title was Hall of Famer Billy Hamilton, who did in it 1891 with a .453 percentage. He would win the second and third title to be won by a Phil player by winning it two years in a row, in 1893 and again in 1894, with on-base percentages of .490 and .521, respectively. Hall of Famer Ed Delahanty would become the second Phil to win the team’s fourth title, the fourth in five years, by winning it in 1895 with an on-base percentage of .500. The next Phil to win the title would be Roy Thomas, who would win the Phil’s fifth and sixth titles in 1902 and 1903, with marks of .414 and .453. The fourth Phil to win the title, the team’s seventh, would be Sherry Magee, who would win it in 1910, with a .445 percentage. The fifth Phil to win the title would be Gavvy Cravath, who won the title in 1915, the year that the Phils won their first National League title and in 1916, with marks of .393 and .379. It would be fourteen years before another Phil would win the team’s tenth title, which would be done by Lefty O’Doul in 1929 with a mark of .465. The seventh Phil to win the title would be Hall of Famer Chuck Klein, who would win the team’s eleventh title in 1933, the year that he won the batting triple crown, by posting an on-base percentage of .422. The eighth Phil to win the title would be Dolph Camilli, who would win the title in 1937 with a .446 percentage. The next Phil to secure the title would be Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn, who would win the title in 1954, 1955 and 1958, with percentages of .441, .449 and .440. The tenth Phil to become the on-base percentage leader would be Dick Allen, who would win the title in 1967 with a .404 mark. Pete Rose would become the eleventh Phil to win it, winning the team’s seventeenth title in 1979 with a .418 mark. The twelfth Phil to win the title would be Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt, who would it in the strike-shortened year of 1981, 1982 and 1983 with marks of .435, .403 and .399. The thirteenth, and at the moment last, Phil to win the title would be Lenny Dykstra, who won the team’s twenty-first title in 1990 with a .418 mark. No Phil has won the title since then.

Of the twenty-one titles won by the Phils, eleven of them, or almost half of them, have been won by Hall of Famers, with Billy Hamilton, Richie Ashburn and Mike Schmidt each winning three titles, while Ed Delahanty and Chick Klein would win the other two titles. Roy Thomas and Gavvy Cravath, other than the three Hall of Famers, have won more than one title, with each man winning two titles. The Phil with the highest on-base percentage when he won the title was Hamilton with his .521 mark in 1894, while the Phil with the lowest percentage was Cravath with his .379 mark in 1916. Phils have won the title four times in the 19th Century, seventeen times in the 20th, and so far have not won it in the 21st Century.

Who will be the next Phil to win the title? I have really no idea.

Philadelphia Phillies – Awards: Slugging Percentage Champions.

In the Phillies’ 126-years history as a National League team, Phillies’ players have had the best slugging percentage among the league’s batters twenty times. The title was won by nine different players, with a few of them actually winning it several times in their careers.

The first Phillie player to win the title was Hall of Famer Ed Delahanty, who won his first slugging title with a .495 slugging percentage in 1892 and then repeated it in 1893 with a .583 slugging mark. The second Phil to win the title, the third overall for the team, was Delahanty’s fellow Hall of Famer Sam Thompson, as he won it in 1895 with a slugging percentage of .654. Delahanty regained the title in 1896 with a .631 slugging percentage. Hall of Famer Nap Lajoie made it three years in a row that a Phil won the title as he won it in 1897 with a .569 slugging percentage. Delahanty won his fourth and final title as a Phil in 1899 with a .582 winning percentage. The next Phil to win the title, the fourth Phillie player to do so, was Sherry Magee, who won the title in 1910 with a .507 slugging percentage. Gavvy Cravath became the fifth Phil to win the title, winning it in 1913 with a 568 slugging percentage. Magee regained the crown in 1914 with a .509 slugging percentage. Cravath took the title back the following year, 1915, as he help lead the Phils to their first National League title with a .510 slugging mark, making it the second time that Phillie players would win the title three years in a row. The next Phillie player to win the title was Cy Williams, winning the crown in 1926 with a .568 slugging percentage. The seventh Phil to win the title was Hall of Famer Chuck Klein, winning the first of three straight slugging titles with a .584 slugging percentage in 1931, one season after having set the Phillies’ single season slugging percentage with a slugging mark of .687. He repeated during his Most Valuable Player season of 1932, winning it with a .646 slugging percentage. He won the crown for a third straight time during his Triple Crown year of 1933, winning the title with a .602 slugging mark. It would be thirty-two years before another Phil won the title. In 1966, Dick Allen became the eighth Phil to win the title, with a slugging percentage of .632. The ninth, and presently, last Phil, to win the title was Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt, doing it five times during his long career. He won his first title in 1974 with a .546 slugging percentage. He then won the title in three straight seasons, the second Phillie player to do so, by first hitting .624 in 1980, helping to lead the team to its first World Series title, then hitting .644 in the strike-shorten year of 1981, and finally with a .547 mark in 1982. Schmidt won his fifth and final title in 1986 with a .547 slugging percentage. No Phil has won the title since then.

Of the twenty titles, all but six titles were won by Hall of Famers, with Mike Schmidt winning the most titles with five wins. Ed Delahanty was next with four, followed by Chuck Klein with three title wins. The Phil who won the title with the highest slugging percentage was Chuck Klein with his .646 slugging percentage during his MVP season of 1932, while Ed Delahanty won it with the lowest percentage as he hit only .495 in 1892. The Phils have won six titles in the 19th century, fourteen in the 20th and, so far, none in the 21st Century.

Who would be the next Phil to win the title? Unless Ryan Howard can do the deed within the next few years, it may be a few more seasons before a Phil will slug his win into the title.

Former Phil Dick Allen on Hall of Fame Veterans Committee Ballot.

Allen’s bat stood out in a pitching-dominant era

Former slugger a Veterans Committee finalist for Hall of Fame

By Jina Song and Craig Muder / National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

I’m not sure Allen is going to get elected, based on who else is on the ballot. My opinion, of course.

In an era dominated by pitchers, Dick Allen proved to be one of baseball’s best hitters.

And though his final numbers were clearly affected by the time in which he played, Allen’s body of work has won him a spot on the Veterans Committee ballot this fall at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Allen, born on March 8, 1942, was known as one of the sport’s top right-handed power-hitters of the 1960s and early ’70s. Allen played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1963-69, 1975-76), St. Louis Cardinals (1970), Los Angeles Dodgers (1971), Chicago White Sox (1972-74) and Oakland Athletics (1977).

In 15 big league seasons, Allen clubbed 320 doubles, 79 triples and 351 home runs in 1,749 games. A third baseman and then a first baseman, Allen drove in 1,119 runs and scored 1,099.

In 1964, Allen was named the National League’s Rookie of the Year after hitting .318 with 29 home runs, 91 RBIs and 201 hits.

Allen earned 1972 Most Valuable Player honors after leading the American League in home runs (37), RBIs (113), slugging (.603) and walks (99). His .534 career slugging percentage was among the highest in an era marked by depressed offensive numbers.

A seven time All-Star, Allen was a three-time league leader in slugging percentage and extra-base hits and twice led his circuit in on-base percentage. He finished in the top five in slugging seven times and extra-base hits six times.

Allen was also a fierce baserunner and finished in the top 10 in steals twice.

Allen will be considered for the Class of 2009 at the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee as part of the post-1942 ballot (players who began their big league careers in 1943 or later). The other members of the post-1942 Veterans Committee final ballot are Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Tony Oliva, Al Oliver, Vada Pinson, Ron Santo, Luis Tiant, Joe Torre and Maury Wills. Any player receiving at least 75 percent of the vote from the Veterans Committee, which consists of the 64 living Hall of Famers, will be enshrined at the Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2009.

Results from the Veterans Committee vote will be announced Dec. 8 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Las Vegas. (H/T National Baseball Hall of Fame.org)

Although Allen has good numbers, since he’s going up against such former players as Ron Santo, Luis Tiant, Joe Torre, Maury Willis and Al Oliver, many of whom he played against, I honestly don’t see him getting the nod in December. I guess we’ll all know one way or the other in December.

With Junior resting, the Phillies hang on to defeat the Reds, 5-4.

Without worrying about Ken Griffey’s Jr.’s bat being in the Reds’ lineup as Junior was taking the day off because of soreness from participating in Sunday’s afternoon game against the Braves, the Phils would hang on to defeat the Reds, 5-4. The Phillies would take a quick 2-0 lead in the first on Chase Utley’s major league leading twenty-first home run of the year off of Reds’ starter Bronson Arroyo, scoring Shane Victorino, who has gotten on base earlier with a single. Utley has now homered in five straight games, tying a franchise record, which has been earlier accomplished by Bobby Abreu (2005), Mike Schmidt (1979) and Dick Allen (1969). The Red would get a run back in the top of the fourth when Jay Bruce would hit his third home run of the year off of Phillies’ starter Kyle Kendrick, making the score 2-1 Phils. In the Phillies’ half of the inning, they would increase their lead as Pedro Feliz would hit his eighth home run of the season, knocking in Geoff Jenkins, who has earlier doubled, making it 4-1 Phillies. Chis Coste would then follow him with a solo shot of his own off of Arroyo, his sixth home run of the year, to make it a 5-1 Phillies’ lead. Edwin Encarnacion would then cut the Phillies’ lead down to 5-2 when he hits a lead off home run off of Kendrick in the fifth, for his ninth home run of the season. One inning later, the Reds would shorten the lead to 5-4 Phillies when, with two out and two men on, Adam Dunn would hit a two-run double off of Chad Durbin, who was pitching in relief of Kendrick, scoring Ryan Freel, who got on base earlier by being safe on a force out, and Bruce, who has earlier singled. Durbin would then get out of the inning with a strike out. That would be it for the Reds as Durbin, Tom Gordon and Brad Lidge would only give up a single among them in the last three innings, with Lidge recording his fourteenth save of the year.

Kyle Kendrck would get the win, as he would pitch five and one-third innings, giving up all four earned runs on five hits. His record is now 5-2 with an ERA of 5.00. Chad Durbin would pitch one and two-thirds innings of relief, giving up no earned runs on two hits. Tom Gordon and Brad Lidge would each pitch a 1-2-3 inning, both giving up no runs on no hits, while Lidge would record his fourteenth save of the year. Bronson Arroyo would get the lost, as he would go only four and a third innings, giving up all five earned runs on ten hits. His record is now 4-5 with an ERA of 5.61. Gary Majewski would pitch one and two-third innings in relief, giving up no runs on one hit. Bill Bray would pitch two-thirds of an inning, giving up no runs on no hits while walking two. David Weathers would pitch an inning and a third in relief, giving up no runs on one hit.

The Phillies’ offense continue its attack as it get twelve hits in the game, including five extra-base hits (2 (2B), 3 (HR)), as they lit up the ERA of yet another opposing starter. In spite of Chad Durbin allowing two runs to score, which would both be charged to Phils’ starter Kyle Kendrick, the Phillies’ bullpen would have yet another successful outing, as they slammed the door shut on the Reds. The Phillies are now nine games above .500 for the first time this season.

The Phillies-Reds four games series will continue tomorrow night from Citizens Bank Park. The game will begin at 7:05 pm Eastern. The Phillies’ (34-25) will be starting Adam Eaton (1-3, 4.99), who is coming off of his first victory of the season against the Rockies on May 28, when he would go six innings, giving up only an earned run on four hits, while striking out four and walking just one batter, in the Phillies’  6-1 win. His career record against the Reds is 2-0 with an ERA of 4.19 in six starts, which includes his earlier start this year against the Reds (28-30, 5th National League Central) on April 5, where he went seven and two-thirds innings, giving up three earned runs on six hits as he received a no-decision, in the Phillies’ 4-3 lost. He will be trying for his second win of the season, while hoping that the bats will once again gives him some runs. His opponent will be Aaron Harang (2-7, 3.81), who is coming off of a lost to the Pirates on May 29, where he would pitch only four innings, as he gives up six earned runs on ten hits, in the Reds’ 7-2 lost. He has already pitched against the Phillies, also versus Eaton, on April 5, where he would get a no-decision while pitching seven innings, giving up two earned runs on six hits, with six strikeouts. He will be trying to get his third win of the season while trying to avoid being involved in another bad start.

With their win, the Phillies are now a game and a half ahead of the second place Marlins, who have lost their game against the Braves in extra-innings. Their win against the Marlin will keep the Braves in third place, still trailing the Phils by three and a half games. The Mets’ lost to the Giants put them back into fourth place, four and a half games behind the Phillies. The Phillies hope to continue winning at home while increasing their lead against their rivals in the division.

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