Results tagged ‘ Doubleheader ’

The Phillies sweep a rain-shortened day-night doubleheader, defeating the Nationals by the scores of 8-5 and 7-5.

The Phillies’ bats and a good start by Brett Myers in the afternoon half of a day-night double bill leads to the sweep of the Nationals in a day-night doubleheader before the rain arrived to stop play. The Phils won 8-5 in the afternoon make-up of an earlier rain out while they won 7-5 in the rain-shortened night cap.

In the first game, the Phils took a quick 1-0 lead in the first, as, with two men out, Raul Ibanez hits a solo home run, his eleventh home run of the year. In the bottom of the first, the Nats would tie the game up at one-all, as, with two men out, Ryan Zimmerman hits his own solo home run, his ninth home run of the year. The Phils retook the lead in the second as Jayson Werth hits a lead-off solo home run, his seventh home run of the year, giving the Phils a 2-0 lead. The Phillies increased their lead in the third, as, with two men on, and one man out, Ibanez busted the game open as he hits a three-run home run, his second home run of the game and his twelfth home run of the season, knocking in Jimmy Rollins, who had earlier singled, and had gone on to second on Shane Victorino’s single, and Victorino, who had just singled, giving the Phillies a 5-1 lead. In the fourth, the Nats got a run back, as, with two men out, Josh Willingham hits a solo home run, his sixth home run, making it a 5-2 Phillies’ lead. In the fifth, the Phils increased their lead to 6-2, when, with two men on, and nobody out, Werth hits an RBI single, scoring Ibanez, who had earlier reached first on Nats’ first baseman Nick Johnson’s fielding error, and had gone to second on Ryan Howard’s single, while sending Howard, who had earlier singled, to second. The Phillies would make it a 7-2 game in the eighth, as, with runners on the corners, and two men out, Rollins hits an RBI single, scoring Chris Coste, who had earlier doubled, while sending Matt Stairs, who had earlier walked, over to third. One batter later, Victorino would give the Phils an 8-2 lead as he hits an RBI single, scoring Stairs, while sending Rollins to second. The Nats would make it an 8-3 Phils’ lead, as, with two men on, and nobody out, Cristian Guzman hits an RBI double, knocking in Anderson Hernandez, who had earlier singled, and had moved up to third on Ronnie Belliard’s single, while sending Belliard, who had earlier singled, over to third. One batter later, the Nats cut the Phils’ lead down to 8-4 as Johnson hits a sacrifice fly, scoring Belliard. Zimmerman made it an 8-5 Phils lead by hitting an RBI single, knocking in Guzman. In the ninth, Brad Lidge came in and nailed down his sixth save of the year.

Brett Myers won the game, pitching his second straight quality start, as he pitched seven strong innings, giving up only two runs on three hits and two walks, while striking out eight. His record is now 3-2 with an ERA of 4.50. Ryan Madson pitched an inning, giving up three runs on four hits. Brad Lidge would record his sixth save of the season as he pitched a scoreless ninth, giving up only one hit, as he struck out a batter. Scott Olsen took the lost as he pitched five innings, giving up six runs, only five of which were earned, on nine hits and two walks, while he struck out only three. His record is now 1-4 with a 7.24 ERA. Garrett Mock pitched three innings in relief, giving up two runs on four hits and a walk, while striking out a batter. Jesus Colome pitched a scoreless inning, giving up just one hit, as he struck out one.

The Phillies banged out fourteen hits in the game. Raul Ibanez and Jayson Werth led the way with three hits apiece, including three home runs (Ibanez (2), Werth (1)), with the two between them knocking in six RBIs (Ibanez (4) and Werth (2)). Jimmy Rollins, Shane Victorino and Chris Coste all followed with two hits each. Ryan Howard and Pedro Feliz had the Phils other two hits. Rollins and Victorino had the other two RBIs, as the bats came alive in the first game.

In the second game, the Phils sent to the mound rookie Andrew Carpenter, as J.A. Happ, the scheduled starter, was no longer available as he had pitched in relief Friday night. The Nats took the lead in the first, as, with a runner on second and nobody out, Johnson hits an RBI single, knocking in Guzman who had earlier doubled. The Phils tied the game up at one-all in the third, as, with a runner on third, and one man out, Chase Utley hits an RBI double, knocking in Rollins, who had earlier tripled. Two batters later, with Utley still on second, and now two men out, Howard would give the Phils the lead as he hits a two-run home run, his eighth home run of the year, knocking in Utley, giving the Phillies a 3-1 lead. The Nationals got a run back in the fourth, as, with a runner on second, and nobody out, Wil Nieves hits an RBI single, scoring Belliard, who had earlier doubled, cutting the Phils’ lead to 3-2. In the fifth, the Phils would break this game open, as, with two men on, and one out, Ibanez hits a three-run home run, his third home run of the day and his thirteenth home run of the season, knocking in Rollins, who had earlier singled and had gone on to third on Utley’s double, and Utley, who had just doubled, making it a 6-2 Phils’ lead. Five batters later, with the bases loaded, via a Howard double and walks to Stairs and Victorino, and with two men out, the Phils made it a 7-2 lead, as Feliz received an RBI walk, scoring Howard. The Nats tried to get back into the game in their half of the fifth. as the weather started to turn bad. With two men on, and one man out, Willie Harris hits a two-run single, scoring Zimmerman, who had earlier walked and had gone on to third on Willingham’s double, and Willingham, who had earlier doubled, making it a 7-4 Phillies’ lead. That would be it for Carpenter, as he would be replaced with Clay Condrey. Belliard would greet Condrey by hitting an RBI triple, scoring Harris, and making it a 7-5 Phils’ lead. But Condrey would end the inning by striking out both Nieves and pinch hitter Alex Cintron. The Phillies would load the bases in the top of the sixth via walks to Rollins and Utley and a single to Ibanez. With Howard batting, the rain started to come down, hard, and the umpires stopped the game. After waiting over an hour, the game would be call, with the Phils winning 7-5.

Andrew Carpernter received the win, his first major league win, as he pitched four and one-third innings, giving up five runs on eight hits and three walks, while striking out four. His record is now 1-0 with a 10.38 ERA. Clay Condrey recorded his first save of the year, as he pitched two-thirds of an inning, giving up a hit, while striking out two. Daniel Cabrera took the lost, as he pitched five innings, giving up seven runs on eight hits and four walks, while striking out three. His record is now 0-5 with a 5.95 ERA. Ron Villone pitched to three batters, giving up a hit and two walks, before the game was called.

The Phillies had nine hits in the second game, with Chase Utley leading the way with three hits, including two doubles. Jimmy Rollins, Raul Ibanez and Ryan Howard got the Phils other six hits, having two hits apiece, with both Howard and Ibanez hitting a home run, while Rollins got a triple. Ibanez knocked in three runs, while Howard brought in two and Utley and Ruiz each brought in a run. The Phillies bat seems to have come alive on their trip to the nation’s capital, as they get ready for a series sweep.

The Phillies (19-16, 2nd) conclude their trip to Washington with an afternoon game with the Nationals (11-24, 5th). The game will be played at Nationals Park and will begin at 1:35 pm. Eastern. The Phils will send to the mound Chan Ho Park (1-1, 6.00), who is coming off his second straight quality start, this one against the Dodgers on May 12, as he went six innings, giving up only two runs on seven hits, while striking out three, in the Phils’ 5-3 win. He will be going for his third straight quality start and his second straight win, while giving the Phils the chance to sweep the series. The Nationals will send to the mound, Jordan Zimmermann (2-1, 5.90), who is coming off a no-decision against the Giants on May 12, as he went six innings, giving up five runs on seven hits and two walks, while striking out eight, in the Nationals’ 9-7 lost. He will be trying to keep the Nats from being swept. The Phillies will be trying to leave Washington with a sweep, after having already recorded a series win at the start of their road trip.

Phillies win an extra-innings thriller in Washington as they defeat the Nationals, 10-6.

Thanks to a bunch of walks from Nats pitching and some timely hitting, the Phils are finally able to defeat the Nationals in extra-innings, 10-6, hours after meeting the President inside the White House and hours before a day-night doubleheader.

The Phils took the lead in the second, as, with runners on the corners, and two men out, Carlos Ruiz hits an RBI single, scoring Raul Ibanez, who had earlier singled and had gone to second on Pedro Feliz’s single, giving the Phils a 1-0 lead, while sending Feliz, who had earlier singled, on to third. The Nats tied the game up at one-all in the third, as, with a runner on second, and one man out, Ryan Zimmerman hits an RBI single off of Chase Utley’s glove, scoring Nick Johnson, who had earlier walked, and had gone to second on Phils’ starter Joe Blanton’s wild pitch, and beat a surprised Utley throw to the plate, while Zimmerman would move up to second on the throw. Later, with the bases loaded, thanks to walks to Adam Dunn and Austin Kearns, and now with two men out, the Nationals took a 2-1 lead as Anderson Hernandez walked, plating Zimmerman, while moving both Dunn and Kearns up a base, leaving the bases loaded. Wil Neaves then made it a 4-1 Nats lead as he hits a two-run single, scoring both Dunn and Kearnes, while sending Hernandez on to third. The Phils would come back in the sixth, as, with two men on, and two men out, Feliz hits an RBI single, scoring Utley, who had earlier been hit by the pitch, and had gone up to second when Ibanez was also hit by a pitch, making it a 4-2 Nats’ lead, while sending Ibanez, who was also hit by a pitch, to third. Ruiz would make it a 4-3 Nats’ lead, as he hits an RBI single, scoring Ibanez, while sending Feliz up to second. The Phils then took the lead in the seventh, as, with two men on, and one out, Ryan Howard hits a three-run home run, his seventh home run of the year, knocking in Jimmy Rollins, who had earlier walked, stole second, and then moved to third on Shane Victorino’s single, and Victorino, who had just singled. Then in the ninth, the Phils gave the ball to Brad Lidge to close out the game. Sadly, it did not happen, as, with two on, and two men out, Willie Harris hits a two-run double, scoring Zimmerman, who had earlier singled, and had gone on to second on Dunn’s grounder to third, which lead to a force out of Johnson, who had earlier singled, as Feliz touched third base for the inning’s second out, but beating the throw to first, making it a six-all tie. The two teams would be unable to do anything in either the tenth or the eleventh, but the Phils would retake the lead in the twelfth, as, with the bases loaded, via walks to Utley, Howard and Jayson Werth, and one man out, Ibanez hits a two-run single, knocking in Utley and Howard, while moving Werth up to second base, giving the Phils an 8-6 lead. Then, with Feliz batting, Werth and Ibanez performed a double steal, which lead to Werth scoring, making it a 9-6 Phils’ lead, as Nats’ catcher Nieves committed a throwing error to center field while trying to throw out Ibanez at second. Feliz then made it a 10-6 Phils’ lead, as Feliz hits an RBI double, scoring Ibanez. That would end up being the final score, as J.A. Happ would get the win, in spite of having some trouble in the inning.

Joe Blanton received a no-decision as he was only able to pitch five innings, giving up four runs on five hits, six walks and a wild pitch, while striking out five. Chad Durbin followed with a scoreless inning, hitting one batter, while also striking out one. Scott Eyre then recorded his fifth hold, as he pitched two-thirds of an inning. Ryan Madson followed for an inning and a third, recording his sixth hold, striking out one. Brad Lidge recorded his second blown save of the year, as he gave up two runs on two hits and a walk, while striking out one. Clay Condrey then pitched a scoreless inning. J.A. Happ picked up the win as he pitched two scoreless inning, giving up just one hit, one walk and hitting a batter, while striking out three. His record is now 2-0 with a 2.49 ERA. John Lannan also recorded a no-decision, as he went five and two-thirds innings, giving up three runs on six hits, a walk and two hit batters, as he struck out only two. Garrett Mock pitched to only one batter, giving up a hit. Ron Villone recorded his second hold as he pitched a third of an inning, giving up no hits or walks. Jesus Colome pitched to two batters, giving up two runs on one hit and a walk. Joe Beimel blew his second save of the season, giving up a run on three hits and a balk, while striking out one. Julian Tavarez pitched an inning and a third, giving up only one hit and two walks, while striking out a batter. Joel Hanrahan pitched two scoreless innings, giving up only a hit and a walk, while striking out three. Kip Wells took the lost as he pitched an inning, giving up four runs on three hits and four walks, while striking out two. His record is now 0-1 with a 6.06 ERA.

The Phils had sixteen hits in the game, as the offense came awake late. Raul Ibanez and Pedro Feliz lead the team with four hits each, with both me knocking in a pair of runs. Carlos Ruiz followed with three hits, as he also knocked in two runs. Shane Victorino then followed with two hits, breaking out of his slump. Jimmy Rollins, Ryan Howard and Chris Coste got the other three Phils’ hits, with Howard’s hit being a three-run home run, while Coste’s was a pinch hit single. The Phils’ bat seems to wake up after Chad Durbin’s hitting of the Nats’ Nick Johnson in the sixth. If so, hopefully the bats will stay awake beyond their series with Washington.

The Phils (17-16, T-2nd) continue there four-games series in Washington with a day-night doubleheader against the Nationals (11-22, 5th). The first game will be played at Nationals Park with a 1:05 pm Eastern start. The Phils’ starter will be Brett Myers (2-2, 4.81), who is coming off a no-decision against the Braves on May 10, where he went six innings, allowing only one run on five runs and two walks, while striking out three, in the Phils’ 4-2 lost. He will be trying for his third win of the year. The Nats will counter with Scott Olsen (1-3, 7.00), who is coming off a no-decision against the D-backs, on May 10, giving up five runs on ten hits and three walks, while he struck out two, in the Nationals’ 10-8 lost. The Phils will be looking for their second straight win, while improving on their road record.

The Phillies have just announced the rescheduled dates for their two rain out games.

The Phillies have just announced the make-up dates for the two games that have been rained out during the past few days. Their make-up game with the Nationals will be played at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, May 16, at 1:05 pm Eastern, as part of a split day-night doubleheader. The make-up game with the Padres will be played at Citizens Bank Park on Thursday, July 23 at 7:05 pm Eastern.

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 8: The Phillies finished in third place in the NL, inspite of losing their manager Harry Wright for most of the season as he goes blind.

The Phillies would start the 1890 season with a major problem. Before the season even starts, as they start to officially call themselves the Phillies, the club would lose several of its players to the teams of the Players’ League, including a new team that the rebellious league had set up in Philadelphia, the new Philadelphia Quakers. This new team would challenge not only the Phils but also the American Association’s Philadelphia franchise, the Philadelphia Athletics, to see which team would reign surpreme in the Philadelphia baseball world.

As the National League finds itself unable to destroy the upstart league through the courts, as New York Supreme Court Justice Morgan J. O’Brien rules on January 28 in favor of John Montgomery Ward, formerly a star pitcher for the New York Giants and now a Hall of Famer, in his reserve clause case against the league, they decide to destroy it on the playing field, despite losing half of the people who had played for National League teams the previous season before the start of the regular season. The league would set things up so that they would end up playing most of their games on the same day as would the teams of their Players’ League opponents, beginning with opening day, April 19.

The Phillies’ opponents for 1890 would include the two franchises that had joined the National League from the weakening American Association, after the previous season, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms and the Cincinnati Reds, replacing the now defunct Washington Nationals and Indianapolis Hoosiers franchises, along with the Beaneaters, the Giants, the Alleghenys, the Spiders and the Chicago franchise, which has before the season changed its nickname from the White Stockings to the Colts. Every member of the league, except for Cincinnati, would face a challenge from a Players’ League franchise, while only Brooklyn and Philadelphia would also face teams from the more friendly American Association. The Phillies would continue to play their home games at the Philadelphia Base Ball Grounds, while Harry Wright would begin his seventh season as the team’s manager, trying to see if he can finally pilot the team to a league pennant.

The Phillies would begin their season on the road in April, playing four games against the previous season’s champ, the Giants, and one game against the former American Association champ, the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would win the season opener behind Kid Gleason, defeating the Giants 4-0. They would then lose the next game, 5-3, before winning the four- games series, 3-1, by defeating New York by the scores of 7-3 and 3-1, and landing in a three-way tie for first place with the Beaneaters and the Alleghenys. The Phils would then lose their game with the Bridegrooms, 10-0, ending their road trip with a record of 3-2 and landing in third place, trailing the Beaneaters by a game. They would then go back home to begin an eleven-games home stand with their eastern rivals the Giants (3), the Beaneaters (4) and the Bridegrooms (4). The Phillies would end the month of April by splitting the first two of their three games with the Giants, ending the month with a record of 4-3 while in a three-way tie with the Bridegrooms and Beaneaters for second place, as they all trailed the now leading Colts by half-a-game.

With the start of May, the Phillies would conclude their series with the Giants, winning the final game, and thus winning the series, 3-1, as they would end up in a four-way tie for first place with the Beaneaters, the Colts and the Reds, all four teams a full game ahead of the Alleghenys and the Bridegrooms. The Phils would then sweep their series with the Beaneaters, putting themselves in first place, a game-and-a-half ahead of the second place Colts. The Phillies would then win their sixth game in a row as they would defeat the Bridegrooms in the first game of their four-games series, 6-1. The Phils would then lose their next two games with Brooklyn, before winning the last game of the home stand, and splitting the series 2-2, while winning their home stand, 8-3, still in first place, but now leading the Colts by two full games. The Phils then go to Boston for a one-game series, which they would lose, 14-7, before coming back home for a long twenty-four games series against all of their league opponents that would last the rest of May and the early part of June. The Phillies would begin the home stand by losing their three-games series with the Reds, 1-2, leaving them just a half-game ahead of the Colts, as their western rival come into Philadelphia for a four-games series. The Phils would win the series, 2-1-1, including a suspended final game which had the Colts leading 10-8, which would end up leaving the Phillies still in first place, a game-and-a-half ahead of the Colts, the Bridegrooms and the Giants. The Phils would next face the Alleghenys for four games. They would sweep the series, including a doubleheader sweep on May 28, winning the games by the scores of 12-10 and 7-2, which would leave them still a game-and-a-half ahead of Brooklyn. The Phils would then end the month playing four games with the Spiders, including their second doubleheader of the month, played on May 30. After winning the first game of the series, they would be swept in the doubleheader, losing the two games by the score of 8-4 and 4-1, before winning the final game of the series, thus ending up splitting their series with Cleveland, 2-2. The Phillies would end the month of May with a 17-8 record, and with an overall record of 21-11-1, a game-and-a-half ahead of both the Reds and the Bridegrooms.

The Phillies would start June by winning their series with the Beaneaters, 2-1 and then with the Bridegrooms, also 2-1, before sweeping their three-games series with the Giants, ending the home stand with a winning record of 17-7, leaving them in first, but now only a-half-game ahead of the Reds. The Phillies would then go on the road for seven games with Boston (4) and Brooklyn (3). The Phils would lose the first game in their series with the Beaneaters, 8-5, having their four-games winning streak snapped, before losing the series overall, 1-3. They would then get swept by the Bridegrooms, becoming mired in a five-games losing streak, as they fall into third place, five-and-a-half games behind the Reds. The Phillies would then go back home for a four-games home stand with the Alleghenys. The Phils would win the short home stand 3-1, still in third, but now trailing by three-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go on an eleven-games road trip to Cleveland (4), Chicago (4) and Cincinnati (3) for the rest of the month and the start of July. The Phils would go to Cleveland, winning the series there, 3-1, as they now stood in second place, still three-and-a-half games behind the Reds. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where they would lose the first game of their series with the Colts, thus ending the month with a 13-11-1 record, and an overall record of 34-22-1, falling back into third place, but still three-and-a-half games behind the Reds.

The Phillies would start July off by winning two of their next three games with the Colts, ending the series with a split, before going on to Cincinnati for their first visit to the Queen City on the Ohio. The Phils would win their first road series against the Reds, 2-1, which would include a doubleheader split on July 4th, winning the first game 11-2, and then losing the ‘nightcap’, 7-1, thus ending the road trip with a record of 7-4, still trailing the Reds by three-and-a-half games, tied for second with the Bridegrooms. The Phils would then go back home for a fifteen-games home stand against the Reds, the Spiders, the Alleghenys, the Colts and the Alleghenys again, for five three-games series. The Phillies would start the home stand by winning their series with the Reds, 2-1, leaving them now just two-and-a-half games behind the Reds, while staying in third place. They would then sweep the other four series in their home stand, thus ending the home stand with a 14-1 record, returning to first place, now leading the second place Bridegrooms by two-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go back on the road, for nine games with the Spiders (2), the Colts (3) and the Reds (4). The Phils would begin the road trip by sweeping the Spiders, increasing their winning streak to fifteen games, while increasing their lead over the Bridegrooms to three games. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where their winning streak would be snapped by the Colts, 12-4, before they ended the series losing it, 1-2, with their lead over Brooklyn shrinking down to two games. The Phillies would then go on to Cincinnati, where they promptly lost the first game of their four-games series to the Reds, ending the month with a 21-6 record and an overall record of 55-28-1, now leading the Bridegrooms by just a game-and-a-half.

The Phils would start the month of August by losing two of three to the Reds, thus losing the series, 1-3, and the road trip with a 4-5 record, now in second place and a game behind the Bridegrooms, as the pennant race starts to heat up. The Phillies would then go back home for a short three-games home stand against the Giants (2) and the Beaneaters (1). The Phils would split their short series with the Giants, 1-1, before losing their game with Boston, ending the homestand, 1-2 and now three games behind Brooklyn, as they remain in second place. The Phillies then go back onto the road for nine games with Boston (2), New York (3) and Brooklyn (4). The Phillies go into Boston, where they are swept by the Beaneaters, dropping them into third, still three games behind Brooklyn. The Phils then go to New York, where they would lose the series to the Giants, 1-2, leaving them four games behind the Bridegrooms, before going into Brooklyn. The Phillies would then fall further behind Brooklyn, as they would lose three of their four games with the Bridegrooms, including a doubleheader lost on the 20, by the lopsided scores of 13-2 and 12-7, ending the road trip with a 2-7 record, now six games behind the first place Bridegrooms, as they fall into fourth place. The Phillies would then return home for a long nineteen-games home stand against all of their opponents for four straight three-games series (Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Chicago and Cincinnati), two straight two-games series (Boston and New York) and then a final three-games series with Brooklyn. The Phils would start the home stand by redeeming themselves as they would proceed to sweep first the Alleghenys and then the Spiders, putting them back into third place, now three games behind Brooklyn. They then had a setback as they got swept in turn by the Colts, ending August with a losing record of 10-14, and an overall mark of 65-42-1, in a technical tie for third place with the Reds, six games behind the league leading Bridegrooms.

The Phillies would start September off by spliting a doubleheader with the Reds on the 1, winning the first game, 2-1 and then losing the ‘nightcap’, 8-5, before winning the third game of the series to win the series, 2-1. They would then split their two-games series with the Giants, which was a doubleheader split on the 3, losing the first game, 9-6, then winning the ‘nightcap’, 9-5, leaving them in third place, eight games behind the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would then be swept by the Beaneaters in their two-games series, leaving them now eight and a half games behind Brooklyn, still in third place, as the Bridegrooms come to Philadelphia for three-games, giving the Phils one last chance to make up ground on first place Brooklyn. The Phils would proceed to sweep the Bridegrooms, winning the three games by scores of 4-3, 13-6 and 9-3, ending the home stand with a record of 12-7, now trailing the Bridegrooms by five-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go on the road for the final time, to play fifteen games in Boston (3), Cincinnati (4), Chicago (2), Pittsburgh (2) and Cleveland (4), for the rest of September and the start of October. The Phillies would start the road trip off by taking two of three from the Beaneaters, leaving them still five-and-a-half games behind Brooklyn and now a game behind the second place Beaneaters. The Philles would then lose three of four to the Reds, watching them stay in third place, six-and-a-half games behind Brooklyn, with only an outside chance to win the pennant. The Phils would then go to Chicago, where they would sweep the Colts, seeing them move up into second place over the Colts, six games behind the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would then go to Pittsburgh, where they would split the two-games series with the Alleghenys, losing the second game by the score of 10-1, thus ending the month with a record of 12-9 and an overall record of 77-51-1, now in third place, seven-and-a-half games behind the Bridegrooms, as Brooklyn clinches the pennant on that same day, September 30, by defeating the Spiders, 4-3 while the second place Colts would lose to the Beaneaters, 6-4.

The Phillies would end the season playing four games in October with the Spiders. After tying the first game, 2-2, they would win the next game, 5-4, before ending the season by being swept in an October 4 doubleheader, losing by the scores of 5-1 and 7-3, ending the month with a record of 1-2-1, the road trip with a record of 7-7-1, and ending the season with a record of 78-53-2, two-and-a-half games behind the second place Colts and nine games behind the league champ, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, so far the only Major League franchise to win a championship two years in a row in two difference leagues (AA 1889, NL 1890).

The Phillies would spend most of the year without their manager as Harry Wright would become blind on May 22. He would not be able to distinguish light from dark for ten days and would not return to manage the Phils until August 6. As Wright recovers, the Phillies would originally replace him with catcher Jack Clements, thus making him the fourth manager in Phillies’ history and the team’s second player-manager. Clements would be at the helm for only nineteen games, compling a record of 12-6-1 for a winning percentage of .667. Phillies co-owner, Al Reach, would replace him as the team’s fifth manager, leading the team for eleven games, compling a losing record of 4-7 for a winning percentage of .364. Reach then replaces himself as the team’s manager with shortstop Bob Allen, making him the team’s sixth manager and the third player-manager in franchise’s history. Allen would remain the team’s leader until Wright’s return, compling a record of 25-10 in thirty-five games, for a winning percentage of .714. Wright would return on August 6, leading the team during the final two-plus months of the pennant race, leading the Phils to its third third place finish, as he compiled a record of 36-31-1 in sixty-eight games, for a winning percentage of .537.

The Phillies would end up playing a total of 133 games, with a home/road split of 54-21-1 at home and 24-32-1 on the road, as 148,366 fans would come to watch them play at home. They would face the Spiders, the Reds and the Beaneaters twenty times each, the Colts and the Allghenys nineteen times, the Bridegrooms eighteen times and the Giants only seventeen times. The Phillies had winning records against four of their opponents, with their best record being against the Alleghenys, as they would go 17-2, followed by the Spiders at 14-5-1. They would have losing records with three teams, with their worst record being against the Bridegrooms, as they went 8-10, followed by both the Beaneaters and the Reds at 9-11. The Phillies would be 9-3 in shut outs, 17-9 in 1-run games and 30-17 in blowouts.

During the season, the Phillies would be either at the top, or near the top, in most offensive categories. The team would be first in doubles (220), batting average (.269) and on-base percentage (.342), second in hits (1267), walks (522), slugging percentage (.364) and stolen bases (335), third in run scored (823) and triples (78), fifth in at-bats (4707), sixth in home runs (23) and strikeouts (403), while also knocking in 631 RBIs, while 64 batters would be hit by the pitch. Meanwhile, the pitchers would also be near the top in most categories. They would be second in saves (2), shut outs (9), innings pitched (1194), home runs allowed (22) and strikeouts (507), fifth in complete games (122), and sixth in ERA (3.32), hits allowed (1210), runs allowed (707), and walks (486), as well as start 133 games, complete eleven games, allowed 440 earned runs, throw 45 wild pitches and commit two balks.

Team offensive leaders for the season would include Billy Hamilton in batting average (.325), on-base percentage (.430), runs scored (133), stolen bases (102), also leading the league in that category, and singles (137), being tied for the league lead with Cliff Carroll of the Chicago Colts. Clements would lead the team in slugging percentage (.472) and home runs (7). Allen would lead in games played (133), walks (87) and strikeouts (54), while being tied with Eddie Burke for triples with 11 each. Sam Thompson would be the team leader in at-bats (549), total plate appearances (599), hits (172), tied for the league lead with Jack Glasscock of the New York Giants, total bases (243), doubles (41), being the league leader, RBIs (102) and extra-base hits (54). Al Myers would lead in hit by the bat by being plunked 10 times.

Pitching wise, 1890 would be the coming out year for Kid Gleason, as he would be the team leader in most pitching categories. He would have the lowest ERA (2.63), win the most games (38, which is still the team’s single season record), highest win-lost percentage (.691), game played (60), saves (2), tied for the lead in that category with Dave Foutz of the Brooklyn Bridegrooms and Bill Hutchison of the Chicago Colts, innings pitched (506), strikeouts (222), games started (55), complete games (54), games finished (5), shutouts (6), hits allowed (479), earned runs allowed (148), while being tied with Tom Vickery for the team lead in home runs allowed (6). Vickery would also lead the team in walks (184), losses (22) and wild pitches (23). The Phils would only have two pitchers who would win twenty or more games, Gleason, setting a club record 38 wins and Vickery with 24.

As the Phillies continue to try to claim their first pennant, the National League Champ, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, would face the American Association Champ, the Louisville Colonels in a seven-games post-season series, that would end up as a 3-3-1 tie between the two teams. Meanwhile, the Players’ League folds, as the league’s idea of having a revenue sharing-pool between the players would backfire, as the owners of the league’s eight teams are unable to make enough of a profit to stay in business. This would force the owners to sell the interest of their teams to the owners of the National League, who would in the process regain many of the players that they had lost to the revolt, such as the Phillies regaining Ed Delahanty from the Cleveland Infants. Meanwhile, as the Players’ League dies, the American Association would kick the Athletics out of the fold, for violating the league’s constitution. The Athletics would then be replaced in the AA by the Quakers of the Players’ League, leaving the Phillies with a rival. Noone, however, would have any idea how damaging the players’ revolt would be to the AA until 1891.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com, Baseball-reference.org, Retrosheet.org

Philadelphia Phillies – Records: Throwing a No-Hitter.

As mentioned in a previous article, there are several feats in baseball which is rare for baseball players to accomplish. Hitting for the cycle is one. Another is throwing a no-hitter. Throwing a perfect game is rarer still. In Major League Baseball History, as of 2008, there has been thrown only 256 no-hitters, of which only 1 has been perfect games. Four teams have so far not been able to throw a no-hitter, those teams being the New York Mets, the San Diego Padres, the Colorado Rockies and the Tampa Bay Rays. In Phillies’ team history, Phil pitchers have thrown only nine no-hitters, including one perfect game, while being the victim eighteen times, as well as being the victim in five other games that are now no longer considered no-hitters because of a rule change made in 1991 in which a no-hitter is now considered, “An official no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings.” The five that are no longer considered no-hitters were games that were stopped before being able to reach the now official nine innings, mainly because of either rain (or pre-1930s, because of the game being called because of darkness.) At this moment, I will concentrate on the nine no-hitters thrown by Phillies’ pitchers.

The first Phillies’ no-hitter would be thrown on Saturday, August 29, 1885, by Charlie Ferguson, as he would defeat Dupee Shaw of the Providence Grays, 1-0, at Recreation Park. The second Phillies’ no-hitter would occur on Friday, July 8, 1898, as Red Donahue would defeat the Boston Beaneaters, 5-0, at National League Park, aka Baker Bowl. The next Phillies’ no-hitter would be the first one thrown by a Phils’ pitcher in the 20th century as Chick Fraser would no-hit the Chicago Cubs in Chicago, 10-0, on Friday, September 18, 1903, at the second ballpark that the Cubs would name West Side Park, in the second game of a doubleheader split between the two old rivals. No-hitter number four would occur on Tuesday, May 1, 1906, in Brooklyn, as Johnny Lush would defeat the Brooklyn Superbas (now the Los Angeles Dodgers) at the second part that Brooklyn would call Washington Park, 6-0. The fifth Phillies no-hitter would not occur until Sunday, June 24, 1964 when Hall of Famer Jim Bunning would throw his father’s day perfect game against the New York Mets at Shea Stadium, winning 6-0. This would be the junior senator from Kentucky second no-hitter, as he threw an earlier one in 1958 as a member of the Detroit Tigers. The next no-hitter recorded by a Phillies’ pitcher would occur over seven years later, on Wednesday, June 23, 1971, as Rick Wise would help his own cause by hitting two home runs in a 4-0 defeat of Ross Grimsley of the Cincinnati Reds, in Cincinnati, at Riverfront Stadium. Phillies no-hitter number seven would be the first no-hitter to be thrown at Veterans Stadium, as Terry Mulholland would defeat Don Robinson of the San Francisco Giants 6-0, on Wednesday, August 15, 1990. No-hitter number eight, the last Phillies’ no-hitter of the 20th Century, would be the only no-hitter so far pitch outside of the U.S. by a Phillies’ pitcher as Tommy Greene would throw a no-no against the Montral Expos at Olympic Stadium, on Thursday, May 23, 1991, defeating Oil Can Boyd, 2-0. The Phillies’ ninth and most recent no-hitter, would also be the first no-no to be thrown by a Phils’ pitcher in the 21st Century, as well as the second and last one to be thrown at Veterans Stadium, as Kevin Millwood would defeat the Giants and Jesse Foppert, 1-0, on Sunday, April 27, 2003.

Phillies’ pitchers have thrown two no-hitters in the 19th Century, six in the 20th and one so far in the 21st Century. Of the nine no-hitters, four have been thrown in Philadelphia, one each has so far occurred in Chicago, Brooklyn, Cincinnati, and Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Two no-hitters were thrown at Veterans Stadium, with one each being thrown at Recreation Park, National League Park (Baker Bowl), West Side Park (II), Washington Park (II), Shea Stadium, Riverfront Stadium and Olympic Stadium. The main victim has so far been the San Francisco Giants, who have been no-noed twice, with the now defunct Providence Grays, Braves (as the Boston Beaneaters), Cubs, Dodgers (as the Brooklyn Superbas), Mets, Reds and the Nationals (as the Montreal Expos) being the victim one time each. Only one of the pitchers to throw a Phillies’ no-hitter, Jim Bunning, is now a member of the Hall of Fame.

Who will be the next Phillies’ pitcher to no-hit an opponent? No idea at this point in time, although the most likely person to do it would be Cole Hamels, the team’s present ace.

Sources: Wikipedia, Phillies.com, Baseball Almanac.com, Retrosheet.org

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 3: Finishing in the first division for the first time, at third place.

With Harry Wright still the team’s manager and with second-year pitcher Charlie Ferguson becoming a rising star, the Quakers/Phillies would begin 1885 attempting its first serious run at the National League pennant, with a chance to meet the winner of the other recognized major league, the American Association, in a post season playoff system, which would be a precusor to today’s World Series, which was first established in 1884, where the National League Champions Providence Grays would end up defeating the American Association Champions New York Metropolitans, 3-0, in a best of three games series.

The Phillies would face a National League that would be slightly different from the one that they had joined in 1883, as the Cleveland Blues franchise would fold early in the year, while the New York Gothams would change their name to the Giants, based on a comment that was suppose to have been said by their player/manager Jim Mutrie, after a victory over the Phillies in the previous season: “My big fellows! My giants!” The franchise that would replace the Blues in the NL would be the best team from the failed third major league of the previous season, the Union Association Champions, the St. Louis Maroons. Along with the Maroons, the Giants and the ‘World Champions’ Grays, the Phillies in 1885 would face the Beaneaters, the Bisons, the Wolverines and the White Stockings.

The Phillies would begin the 1885 season with a twenty-three games home stand that would cover all of May and their first game in June. During this long home stand, they would play a game with the league champs Grays, followed by two with the Beaneaters, another game with the Grays, then two more with the Beaneaters, before playing eight straight two-games series with the Wolverines, the White Stockings, the Wolverines again, the White Stockings again, the Maroons, the Bisons, the Maroons again, the Bisons again, and then a single game with the Giants. The Phillies would start the season off on a sour note as they would lose their first three home games by scores of 8-2, 2-0 and 9-8, before going on a six-games winning streak, which would include a 15-5 crushing of Boston, followed by 10-3 and 17-8 drubbings of the Wolverines. After dropping two straight games to their western nemesis, the White Stockings, they would then win two straight games against the Maroons, winning the second game by the lop-sided score of 12-1, before losing the first game in their two-games series with the Bisons. The Phils would then go on a five-games winning streak, thus ending May with a winning record of 14-8, the team’s best start in its short history.

The Phillies would start off June, and end their home stand, with a lost to the Giants, giving them a 14-9 home stand. This game would be the start of a four-game, Philadelphia to New York and back again series between the two clubs. After defeating the Giants in New York, the Phillies would drop their second home game with New York, before dropping the second game in NY. The Phils would then go on an eight-games road trip to the east coast, meeting the Grays for two-games, the Beaneaters for two, and then going to Providence, Boston, Providence and then Boston again for the last four games of the trip. The Phillies would lose both of their games with the Grays, before finally breaking their four-games losing streak with a victory over Boston. After losing their second game with Boston, they would defeat the Grays, before losing the next two games in Boston and Providence. They would then end their nine-games road trip with a victory over the Beaneaters, thus ending their Eastern trip with a 3-7 record. After splitting another Philadelphia to New York series with the Giants, losing at home and winning in New York, the Phillies would go on their first trip to the west, planning to meet the White Stockings, the Maroons, the Bisons and the Wolverines for several four-games series, for the rest of June and the start of July. After losing the first two games, the Phillies would end their visit to Chicago with a series split, as they would win the last two games. Going to St. Louis for the first time in the organization’s existance, their would lose the first three games of the series, thus ending the month with a sour record of 7-14, while having an overall record of 21-22 for the season.

July would begin with the Phillies winning the final game of their first road series in St. Louis. After losing the first game of their series with the Bisons, the Phillies would sweep a July 4th doubleheader from them by the scores of 10-5 and 7-2, the first doubleheader sweep in the franchise’s history. The Phils would then lose the last game of their series with the Bisons, then lose their first two games with the Wolverines, before splitting the last two games, thus ending the road trip with a 6-10 record. The Phillies would then come home to play a twenty-games home stand for the rest of July and early August, in which they would play seven straight two-games series with the Beaneaters, the Grays, the Wolverines, the Maroons, the Wolverines again, the Maroons again, and the White Stockings, before playing a single game with the Bisons, followed by two more games with the White Stockings and then three more games with the Bisons, before they would go on another east coast road trip. The Phillies would start the home stand by splitting their series with Boston, before being swept by Providence. After splitting the next two series, they would sweep their second two-games series with Detriot, including a 19-2 rout, before being swept themselves by both the Maroons and the White Stockings, with the later two games being 2-0 and 9-0 shut outs. The Phillies would thus end July just as badly as they had ended June, with a 9-14 record, while their overall record would now be a somewhat respectible 30-36.

After starting August by defeating the Bisons, the Phillies would be swept once again by the White Stockings, before ending the home stand by winning two of their three games with the Bisons, thus ending the home stand with an 8-12 record. The Phils would then visit Boston, Providence and New York for three straight two-games series on the road. The Phils would sweep the Grays, then spilt their series with the Beaneaters, before being swept by the Giants, to end up with a 3-3 road trip. They would then participate in a six-games home stand with the Beaneaters for two games, the Grays for three and the Giants for one. After splitting the series with Boston, the Phillies would then proceed to sweep the Grays, starting it with a 2-0 blanking in the series’ first game, and ending it with Charlie Ferguson pitching a 1-0 no-hitter against the Grays on August 29, the first no-hitter in the franchise’s history. The Phils would then end their home stand by losing to the Giants for a 4-2 home stand and ending the month with an 11-11 record. The team’s overall record would now be at 41-47.

The Phillies would start off September by visiting the Giants, before playing against them at home for two more games. After losing the game in New York, the Phillies would sweep New York at home, which would be their last home games of the year, as they would now spend the rest of September and all of their October games on the road. With their two wins over the Giants, they would end the year with a 29-26 mark at home, while their overall record at this point would be 43-48. Their long twenty-games road trip would include two straight two-games series with the Grays and the Beaneaters, before ending with four four-games series with the four western teams, the Bisons, the Wolverines, the Maroons and the White Stockings. After splitting the series with Providence, they would sweep the two-games series with Boston. After losing the first game in Buffalo, they would win the next three games against the Bisons, before going to Detroit and losing the series with the Wolverines, 1-3. The Phillies would then go to St. Louis, where they would win their last game in September, to end the month with a 10-6 record, and an overall record of 51-53, now just two games under .500.

The Phillies would start October with a 3-3 tie against the Maroons, before sweeping the next two games to take the series at 3-0-1. In their last series of the year, against Chicago, after losing the first game, they would win their last three games of the season, to end the month with a 5-1-1 record, and the road trip at 13-6-1, as they would end the season at 56-54-1. This would land them in third place for the first time in the team’s history with a .509 winning percentage, three games ahead of the fourth place Grays, 28 games behind the second place Giants and 30 games behind the 1885 NL Champs, the White Stockings. The team’s road record would end up being 27-28-1.

The Phillies would meet the other teams in the National League sixteen times each, except for the Grays, whom they would meet fifteen times. They would have winning records against five of those teams (Beaneaters, Bisons, Wolverines, Grays and Maroons) with their best record being against the Bisons at 11-5. Their worst records would be against the White Stockings and the Giants, both ending up at 5-11. The Phillies would be 10-9 in shut outs, 13-12 in 1-run games and 17-19 in blowouts. The Phillies would play 55 games at home before 150,698 fans.

In 111 games played, Phillies batters would end up being second in doubles (156), fourth in walks (220), fifth in at-bats (3893), runs scored (513) and home runs (20) and sixth in hits (891), triples (35), strike outs (401), batting average (.229), slugging percentage (.302) and on-base percentage (.270), while also having 327 rbis. Among pitchers, the team ended up second in hits allowed (860), third in ERA (2.39), wins (56), complete games (108), shut outs (10), runs allowed (511), home runs allowed (18), walks given up (218), fourth in innings pitched (976), fifth in saves (0) and strike outs (378) and sixth in loses (54), while also finishing three games, giving up 259 earned runs, throwing 63 wild pitches and being called for three balks.

Individually, the team leaders in offensive categories would be Joe Mulvey at Batting Average (.269), Slugging Percentage (.393), Hits (119), Total Bases (174), Doubles (25), Triples and Home Runs (6 each) and RBIs (64), Ed Andrews in on-base percentage (.318), runs scored (77) and singles (94), Sid Farrar and Jim Fogarty in games played (111), Jack Manning in at-bats (445), total plate appearances (482) and walks (37) and Charlie Bastian in strikeouts with 82. Among pitchers, Charlie Ferguson and Ed Daily would be tied for the team lead in wins with 26, becoming the first pitchers to win 20 or more games in the same year in franchise’s history, while Daily would become the team’s second twenty-games winner. Daily would also lead the team in ERA (2.21), games pitched (50), innings pitched (440), home runs allowed (12), walks (90), hits allowed (370), loses (23), earned runs allowed (108), and wild pitches (40), while Ferguson led the team in strikeouts (197), shut outs (5) and games finished (3).

The Phillies’ third place finish would, for the moment, place them among the league’s elite, while they prepare to compete for a league pennant in 1886.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com, Baseball-reference.com, Baseball History: 19th Century Baseball.com

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 1: Rejoining the National League and landing in the cellar.

In 1883, Philadelphia, along with New York, would rejoin the eight-teams National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or the National League, after the 1876 editions of both clubs, in the league’s first season of existence, were both expelled by the league for their refusal to participate in a late season western cities road trip. The new Philadelphia team, nicknamed the Quakers, would be brought into existance by former professional ballplayer and sporting goods manufacturer Al Reach, and his partner, attorney John Rogers, after the two men had successfully won the franchise rights of the now defunct Worcester (Massachusetts) Brown Stockings (also known as the Ruby Legs), which has gone bankrupt in 1882. Reach would become the team’s first president. The team’s first manager would be Bob Ferguson, who was, like Reach, a former professional ballplayer, as well as the former manager of the Troy (New York) Trojans, another disbanded team, whose franchise right would be bought by the New York Gothams (later the New York/San Francisco Giants). The Quakers would play their home games out of Recreation Park, which was located in North Philadelphia between 23rd and 25th Streets and Ridge and Columbia (now Cecil B. Moore) Avenues.

The Phillies’ opponents for its inaugural season, along with fellow newcomer, the New York Gothams, would be, by geographical order: Boston Beaneaters (1876 member);  Providence (Rhode Island) Grays (1878 member); Buffalo (New York) Bisons (1879 member); Cleveland Blues (1879 member); Detroit Wolverines (1881 member) and Chicago White Stockings (1876 member). Of the other six teams, only Boston (now in Atlanta) and Chicago, along with the new teams from Philadelphia and New York (now in San Francisco), would still be playing in the National League.

The Quakers’ first game, which was also their first home game, would be played on May 1, 1883 against the Providence Grays. The game would end up as a 4-3 lost to the Grays. The Phillies would then play two more games with the Grays, followed by a three game series at home with the Beaneaters, all loses, including two games in which the opposition would score twenty or more runs against the Quakers, a 24-6 thumping by the Grays on May 3 and a 20-8 defeat by the Beaneaters on May 7, ending the team’s first home stand winless. After losing two straight games on the road to the White Stockings in Chicago, the Quakers would finally get the first victory in Phillies’ history, a 12-1 victory on May 14 against the White Stockings, thus ending the first losing streak in Phillies’ history at eight games. After winning their second victory over the Wolverines in Detroit, for the club’s first winning streak, the Quakers would lose the next two games in the series, quickly followed by a two-game split with the Blues in Cleveland before they would lose their three games series against the Bisons in Buffalo, including the first game in which the Phillies would be unable to score a single run, losing 4-0 on May 25, before winning the last game in the series on May 28, 3-2, thus ending its first road trip at 4-7. But before their next home stand, the Quakers’ manager, Ferguson, with a record of 4-13, would be fired by the owners, thus becoming the first Phillies manager to be let go. He would be quickly replaced by Blondie Purcell, a player on the Quakers’, thus becoming the team’s first player-manager. Sadly, the change in managers would not improve the team’s fortunes, as they would begin their next home stand, on May 30, losing the team’s first doubleheader, dropping both games to the White Stockings by the lopsided scores of 15-8 and 22-4. The team would then end their first month of existance by losing their third game in a row to the White Stockings by the score of 4-3, with a record for the month of 4-16.

June would begin just as badly for the Quakers as it would finish its first four game series by losing to the White Stockings 10-1. During the rest of the home stand, three more four games series with the Wolverines, Blues, and Bisons, the team would go 4-8, which would include the first game in which the Quakers would score 20 or more runs, a 20-4 drubbings of the Wolverines on June 6, which was also the team’s first home victory, as well as the team’s first shut out victory, a 2-0 win against the Bisons on June 14, ending the home stand at 4-12. The team would then go back on the road for two two-games series with the Beaneaters and the Grays and a single game series with the Gothams. The Quakers’ bad fortune would continue as they would lose the first six games of that road trip, including a 29-4 shlacking by the Beaneaters on June 20, before finally gaining another road victory, the team’s first shut out defeat of an opponent on the road, as they would defeat the Grays 4-0 on June 26, before losing the last two games of the road trip. The team would then come home to face the Gothams, losing the game 8-6, thus ending the month of June with a losing record of 5-18 and an overall record of 9-34, last in the league. Also in June, on the ninth, the NL would allow the Quakers to slash its ticket prices down to .25 cents, so that it would be able to compete with the more popular Philadelphia Athletics baseball club of the rival American Association, as the team’s home attendence would increase because of the decrease in ticket price.

In July, things doesn’t get any better for the ballclub, as the Quakers would lose two more games to the Gothams, the first one at Recreation Park, then the other in New York, before they begin a short four games home stand with the Grays and the Beaneaters. After winning a forfeit with the Grays (the actual score was 9-11 Grays) as the Grays had to leave town so that they could play a game with the Gothams in New York on that same day, the Quakers would get swept once again by the Beaneaters, including a game that they would play after the forfeited game with the Grays (both played on July 4). (The forefited game would also be the first series that the Phillies would win in the club’s history.) The Quakers would then spend the rest of the month on another ‘western’ road trip, which would include a five games series (their first) with the Blues, and three straight four games series against the Bisons, the White Stockings and the Wolverines. By the time they finally limp back home on August 4 to face the Gothams, the road trip would be a complete disaster, as they would only win three games of the seventeen games road trip, thus ending the month of July with a 3-17 record, while their overall season record would now be at 12-51, still in last place.

Back home, the Phillies would lose to the Gothams, before heading to New York to lose the next game. After coming back home to gain a victory over their fellow newcomer, they would go back to New York, where they would be swept in two games there. They would then be swept in two straight three games series by both the Beaneaters and the Grays, the two teams who were at this point fighting for the National League pennant. Among these loses would be a 28-0 drubbing at the hands of the Grays on August 21, the most lopsided shut out in the game’s history. The Quakers would then end the month playing three more games with the Gothams (one of which was played at Recreation Park) and two home games with the Grays, losing all five, thus ending the month of August with a 2-17 record and an overall record of 14-68.

The Quakers would spend the rest of the season playing at home, playing seventeen games with the Beaneaters (1), the Grays (1), the Gothams (2), the Blues (3), the Bisons (3), the Wolverines (4) and the White Stockings (3). The Quakers would go 3-13-1 in those games, which would include their third two-games winning streak, as they would win single games with the Grays, winning their second series, and the Gothams, get no-hit on September 13 by Hugh Daly of the Blues, losing 1-0, and be tied for the first time in the team’s history on September 22 with the Wolverines, as the two teams would play that day to a 6-6 tie. The Quakers would end its first season in the National League in last place with a 17-81-1 record, 23 games behind seventh place Detroit and 46 games behind the league’s champion, the Boston Beaneaters.

Against the rest of the league, the team would only have losing records in 1883: Beaneaters (0-14); Grays (3-11); Gothams (2-12); Bisons (5-9); Blues (2-12); Wolverines (3-11-1) and White Stockings (2-12), with its worst record being against the Beaneaters and its best being against the Bisons. They would be 3-7 in shut outs, 2-12 in 1-run games and 4-42 in blowouts.

In a 99 games season, the team would go to the plate a total of 3576 times (6th) while getting only 859 hits (7th) for a team batting average of .240 (8th), a team on-base percentage of .269 (8th) and a team slugging percentage of .320 (8th). The Quakers would score 437 runs (8th) on 299 RBIs. The team would get 181 2Bs (6th), 48 3Bs (6th) and 3 HRs (8th), while also receiving 141 walks (4th) as they struck out 355 (5th) times. Pitching wise, the Quakers had a Team ERA of 5.34 (8th), and in 99 games played, they had 91 complete games (2nd) with 8 other games finished by another pitcher, only 3 (8th) of which would be shut outs. In 864 innings pitched (5th), the team’s pitchers would give up 1267 hits (8th), allow 887 runs (8th) to score of which 513 were earned, give up 20 HRs (6th) and walk 125 batters (5th) and strike out only 253 (8th).

Individually, the team batting leader was Purcell with a .268 batting average, while Jack Manning would lead the team in slugging percentage with .364 and in on-base percentage with .300. Purcell would also lead the team with 425 at-bats, 70 runs scored, 114 hits and 88 singles, while Manning would also lead the team in total at-bats with about 470, 153 total bases, 31 doubles, and 37 RBIs. Other team batting leaders were: Sid Farrar in games played (99); John Coleman and Farrar in triples (8 each); Purcell, Bil McClellan and Emil Gross in home runs (1 each); Bill Harbridge in walks (24) and Coleman in strikeouts (39). In pitching, Coleman would also be the team leader in ERA (4.87), wins (12), loses (48), games pitched (65), innings pitched (538.3), strikeouts (159), games started (61), complete games (59), and shut outs (3).

After the season, Purcell would be replaced as the team’s manager with Harry Wright, another former professional ballplayer, and former manager of the second place Grays, and before that, the manager of the Beaneaters, leading that franchise to NL pennants in 1877 and 1878. It was hoped by both Reach and Rogers that he would turn the team’s fortune around.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com and Baseball-Reference.com

On the eve of the 2008 World Series, let us take another look at the numbers.

It is now two days before the start of the 2008 World Series, which will be played at the home ball park of the American League Champion, the Tampa Bay Rays, Tropicana Field, on Wednesday, October 22, at 8:22 pm Eastern. The Tampa Bay Rays will be hosting the National League Champion, the Philadelphia Phillies, a team that has just won only its sixth pennant in its 125-years history. So, how did Charlie Manuel’s boys get here, on the verge of possibily winning the franchise’s second World Series crown? Let look at the numbers, shall we?

First, let’s see how well this team did month by month. 

March/April: 15-13

May: 17-12

June: 12-14

July: 15-10

August: 16-13

September: 17-8

Total: 92-70

As can be seen, the team has winning records in six of the seven months shown above, with their best month being September, when the team, with Ryan Howard’s resurging bat leading the way, would sprint their way to the National League Eastern Division pennant, and with their worst month being June, which coincided with their bad spell of Interleague play. More on that later.

Another thing that people have said is that you have to win series to win pennants, and the Phillies have also done that. At the end of the regular season, they have ended up with 27 series wins, 19 series loses and 6 series splits. Of their 27 series wins, they have won all of the games (sweep) in nine of them (Colorado (2), Atlanta (3), Washington (2), Los Angeles (NL) (1), Milwaukee (1)) for a total of 28 wins, while in their 19 series defeats they were swept only twice (Los Angeles (AL), Los Angeles (NL)) for a total of 7 loses. Of their 10 series wins during the last two months of the regular season, their most important ones would be the one against the Padres in San Diego as it would help to get the team back on track after having been swept by the Dodgers in Los Angeles; their home sweep of the Dodgers since it would help prove to the team that they can beat anybody at home; their win against the Mets in New York at the beginning of September as it would help the Phillies stay close to the Mets, especially after having lost the previous series in Washington; their four games sweep of the Brewers, as it would give the Phillies the option of winning either the Eastern Division or the Wild Card, putting them in the driver seat of the later as they challenged the fading Mets for the former; their final sweep of the Braves in Atlanta as it would help to build up momentum for; their series win against the Marlins in Miami, in which they would help to kill the Marlins’ own hope for the post-season; and lastly, their second sweep of the Nationals which would see them clinch their second straight divisonal crown on the last Saturday of the regular season, while the Sunday win by the rookies and the bench players would help them to maintain momentum going into the National League Divisional Series against Milwaukee.

Another thing that you need to do is to win games in your own division. And the Phillies have actually accomplished that, believe it or not. In fact, they have done pretty well against both teams in their own division and against the teams of the other two divisions within the National League:

National League East: 41-31

National League Central: 27-16

National League West: 20-12

Unfortunately, they have not done so well this year against teams from the American League, going 4-11 in Interleague play.

But, how well have they performed against the other clubs in the National League? The Phillies would end the regualr season with losing records against only two other NL teams, both of them being teams within their own division:

National League East:

Atlanta Braves: 14-4

Washington Nationals: 12-6

Florida Marlins: 8-10

New York Mets: 7-11

Total: 41-31

The Phillies’ best record in both the division and against the NL overall was their 14-4 record against the Braves, which included their three straight three games sweeps of the Braves’ in their own ball park, something that have not happened to the Braves since they were swept by the Chicago Cubs in 1909, when they were known as the Boston Doves. Their worst record in the division was their 7-11 record against the New York Mets, who won all but the last two series with the Phils, including their series spilt of late August in Philadelphia and the Phillies’ 2-1 series victory in New York in early September, including the spilt of a day/night Sunday doubleheader which would keep the Phillies close to the Mets before they would make their final move to win the Eastern Division pennant.

National League Central:

Milwaukee Brewers: 5-1

Cincinnati Reds: 5-3

St. Louis Cardinals: 5-4

Chicago Cubs: 4-3

Houston Astros: 4-3

Pittsburgh Pirates: 4-2

Total: 27-16

Against the teams of the National League Central Division, the Phillies would do rather well, winning most of their series against them. They would do best against the Brew Crew, spliting the series in Milwaukee and then sweeping them in an important August series in Philadelphia that would help propel the Phillies into the lead of the National League Wild Card race, on their way to their eventual winning of the National League Eastern Division.

National League West:

Colorado Rockies: 5-0

Los Angeles Dodgers: 4-4

Arizona Diamonbacks: 4-3

San Diego Padres: 4-2

San Francisco Giants: 3-3

Total: 20-12

Against the West, the Phillies would end the season with a 20-12 record, doing their best against the Rockies, as they would get even with the former National League Champions for losing the 2007 National League Divisional Series by sweeping them in five games, although they would do the home portion of the sweep against a wounded team, while doing their worst against both the Giants and the Dodgers, as they would spilt home series with both teams, winning the series at Citizens Bank Park (2-1 (Giants), 4-0 (Dodgers)), while losing the series on the road (1-2 (Giants), 0-4 (Dodgers)).

Last, and certainly not least, the Phillies did not do very well this year in Interleague play. Lets face facts, people, they stank, as they went 2-4 against two teams in the American League East, and 2-7 against three teams from the American League West, while going 1-5 against two of the elite teams in the American League (Boston and Los Angeles Angels):

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim: 0-3

Boston Red Sox: 1-2

Oakland Athletics: 1-2

Texas Rangers: 1-2

Toronto Blue Jays: 1-2

Total: 4-11

With their record against American League teams in Interleague play, it should means that this team might have a hard time with the American League Champion Tampa Bay Ray. But the team that got creamed by the American League in May and June is not the same team that have finished crushing first the Milwaukee Brewers in the Divisional Series and then the Los Angeles Dodgers in the Championship Series, and with little help from either their set up man (Jimmy Rollins) or their biggest offensive threat (Ryan Howard) until the end of both series. This team appears to be a lot more confident now then they did when they faced the American League elite teams the Boston Red Sox and the Los Angeles Angels at home back in June. That might make all the difference by the time the World Series is over.

The Phillies also had a very good home-road split. At Citizens Bank Park, they had a record of 48-33, where they were in a four way tie for the second best record for the National League, while they were 44-37 on the road, the best record in the National League. Overall, their 92-70 record was the second best in the National League, trailing only the Chicago Cubs (97-64) and the fifth best in the Majors. Those two records of success at both home and on the road should help the Phillies when they face the Rays starting on Wednesday.

The Phillies come from behind to defeat the Brewers, 7-3. Are now a game behind in the wild card race and a game and a half behind in the East.

The Phillies come from behind to defeat the slumping Brew Crew, using the eighth inning to their advantage for a change. The Brewers would jump to a quick 2-0 lead as, with a runner on third and one man out, Ray Durham would hit a two-run home run, his sixth home run of the year, knocking in Corey Hart, who has earlier tripled. The Phillies would cut the lead in the fourth, as, with runners on the corners and no one out, Pat Burrell would hit into a 6-4-3 double play, wiping out Ryan Howard at second, who has earlier singled, while scoring Chase Utley, who has earlier doubled and has gone to third on Howard’s single, making it 2-1 Brewers. The Brewers would get the run back in the fifth as Mike Cameron would hit a lead-off home run, his twenty-fifth home run of the year, to make it 3-1 Brewers. The Phillies would tie up the game in the sixth, when, with a runner on first and no one out, Howard would hit a massive two-run home run, his league leading forty-fourth home run of the year, scoring Utley, who has gotten on base earlier after being hit by the pitch. Then the Phillies turned the recently disastrous eighth to their favor for once. After taking out Phillies’ starter Joe Blanton for a pinch hitter in the seventh, Ryan Madson would get out the two batters that he would face via ground outs, both being 6-3 (Hart and J.J. Hardy) before Charlie Manuel would come out to replace him with Scott Eyre. Eyre would end the inning by striking out Durham on a foul tip. Durham would claim that the ball would hit the ground, but Carlos Ruiz, Manuel and Eyre would get home plate umpire Mark Wegner to double check with first base umpire Scott Barry. Barry would say that Ruiz did indeed catch the ball, as would be shown by instant reply on television, thus ending the inning. Then in the Phillies’ half of the eighth, they would break the game open. With Guillermo Mota still on the mound for his second inning of work, Jayson Werth would start off the inning with a single. Ned Yost would then come to the mound and replace Mota with Brian Shouse, who is soon greeted by a surprising sacrifice bunt by Utley, which would move Werth over to second as Utley is thrown out, 1 to 3, for the inning’s first out. Howard is then intentionally walked to get to Burrell, while putting men on first and second with still one out. But Burrell would ruin the Brewers’ strategy by hitting a RBI single, scoring Werth, and giving the Phils a 4-3 lead, while sending Howard to second. After Eric Bruntlett is sent out to first as a pinch runner for Burrell, Shane Victorino would hit a three-run home run, his twelfth home run of the year, scoring both Howard and Bruntlett, making it a 7-3 Phillies’ lead. In the ninth, Eyre would start off the inning by getting Prince Fielder out on a great play by Utley who would throw Fielder out 4-3, for the inning’s first out. Eyre would then be replaced by Brad Lidge, who would then proceed to get Ryan Braun to ground out 4-3 before he gets Cameron to end the game by striking out.

Joe Blanton would get a no-decision as he pitched seven innings, giving up three earned runs on five hits. Ryan Madson would pitch two-thirds of an inning, giving up no runs or hits. Scott Eyre would get the win as he pitches two-thirds of an inning, also giving up no runs or hits. His record is now 4-0 with an ERA 4.43. Brad Lidge would also go two-thirds of an inning, giving up no runs on no hits and striking out one. Dave Bush would also receive a no-decision as he pitches six innings, giving up three earned runs on five hits. Guillermo Mota would get the lost as he pitches an inning plus one batter, giving up an earned run on one hit. His record is now 5-6 with an ERA of 4.10. Brian Shouse would pitch a third of an inning, giving up three earned runs on three hits. Eric Gagne would pitch two-thirds of an inning, giving up no runs or hits.

Joe Blanton would this afternoon performed as originally advertised, pitching deep into a game, although having problems in the first few innings. After giving up a two-run home run in the first, thanks to a floating curveball to Ray Durham, he would calm down enough to get through seven innings, keeping the Phils in the game so that they can first tie up the game and then take the lead in the bottom of the eighth.

The second game of the Day/Night doubleheader is being played right now, with the Phillies leading 6-1 going into the bottom of the seventh inning, with Brett Myers pitching a two-hitter with the second hiting a solo home run to Prince Fielder while the Phillies have knocked out of the game Brewers’ starter Jeff Suppan in the fourth, heading for both a possible doubleheader sweep and a possible series sweep.

With the win, the Phillies are now trailing the Mets by a game and a half as they lose to the Braves. They are still five games ahead of the Marlins as they defeated the Nationals. In the Wild Card chase, the Phillies are now a game behind the Brewers, as they try to sweep them in the nightcap. They are at the moment a game ahead of the Astros, who are presently losing to the Cubs, while they are four games ahead of the Cardinals as they lose once again to the Pirates. The Phillies will be trying to sweep the Brew Crew in the second game of their doubleheader to tie for the lead in the Wild Card race while placing themselves a game behind the Mets in the East.

Phillies’ bats sting the Brewers as they tighten up things in both the Wild Card and in the East.

The Phillies’ bats would hurt the Brew Crew yesterday afternoon as they force the races to tighten up in both the Wild Card chase (2 games) and in the Eastern Division (2 and 1/2 games) as they defeated the Brewers, 7-3. The Phillies took a quick lead in the first, as, with a runner on first and with no one out, Chase Utley would hit a RBI double, scoring Jimmy Rollins, who has earlier singled, giving the Phillies a 1-0 lead, while Utley would go on to third on Rickie Weeks’  throwing error. Jayson Werth would make it 2-0 Phillies as he would hit a RBI single, scoring Utley from third. After Werth goes to second on Brewers’ starter Manny Parra’s wild pitch, Ryan Howard would reach base with a walk, putting runners on first and second with still no outs. After Pat Burrell strikes out for the inning’s first out, Shane Victorino would hit a RBI single, scoring Werth, making it 3-0 Phillies. The Phillies would increase their lead in the second, as, with the bases loaded via a double (Rollins), a single (Utley) and a walk (Werth) and with no one out, Howard would hit a two-run double, scoring both Rollins and Utley, giving the Phillies a 5-0 lead. The Brewers would cut the Phillies’ lead to 5-2 in the fourth, as, with two men on and with two outs, Jason Kendall would hit a two-run double on a ball that was misplayed by Burrell, scoring both Mike Cameron, who has earlier walked and would then move to second on Bill Hall’s single, and Hall. The Phillies would then add to their lead in the sixth, as, with a runner on second and two outs, Rollins would hit a two-run home run, his elevnth home run of the year, scoring Pedro Feliz, who has earlier singled, and has gone to second on Phillies’ starter Cole Hamels’ sacrifice bunt, making it 7-2 Phillies. The Brewers would shorten the Phillies’ lead in the eighth inning, as Ryan Braun hit a lead-off home run, his thirty-fifth home run of the year, making it 7-3 Phils. That would end up being the final score as Brad Lidge would put down the Brewers easily in the ninth.

Cole Hamels would get the win as he pitches six and a third innings, giving up only two earned runs on six hits. His record is now 13-9 with a 3.11 ERA. Chad Durbin would pitch an inning and a third, giving up an earned run on two hits. J.C. Romero would pitch a third of an inning, giving up no runs on no hits while walking one. Brad Lidge would pitch a scoreless inning, giving up a walk. Manny Parra would get the lost as he lasts only an inning and a third, as he gives up five earned runs on seven hits while walking three. His record is now 10-8 with an ERA of 4.28. Tim Dillard would pitch two-thirds of an inning, giving up no runs on no hits. Seth McClung would pitch a scoreless inning, giving up no hits. Carlos Villanueva would pitch three innings, giving up two earned runs on two hits while striking out four. Mark DeFelice and Todd Coffey would both pitch a scoreless inning, giving up no hits.

The Phillies (81-67) will conclude their four games series with the Brewers (83-65, 2nd National League Central, 1st Wild Card) by playing a makeup day/night doubleheader. Both games will be played later today at Citizens Bank Park. The first game will start at 1:35 pm Eastern. The Phillies’ starter will be Joe Blanton (7-12 (2-0), 4.86), who is coming off a win against the Marlins on September 8, where he went five innings, giving up four earned runs on five hits, in the Phillies’ 8-6 win. He has never pitched against the Brewers in his career. He will be going for his third win since putting on the red pinstripes while trying to get the Phillies closer to the wild card lead while also trying to eat up some more innings to help out the bullpen. His opponent will be Dave Bush (9-10, 4.23), who is coming off a no-decision against the Reds on September 8, where he went eight innings, giving up two earned runs on seven hits, in the Brewers’ 5-4 lost. He will be trying to even his record while trying to stop the Brewers’ present slide.

The second game of the twinbill will start at 7:35 pm Eastern. The Phillies’ starter will be Brett Myers (9-11, 4.22), who is coming off a hard lost to the Marlins on September 10, where he went seven and one third innings, giving up four earned runs on eight hits, while striking out nine, in the Phillies’ 7-3 lost. After coming back from the minors, he has gone 6-2 with two no-decisions in ten starts. He will be pitching on three days rest, eager to help his team. His opponent will be Jeff Suppan (10-8, 4.63 ), who is coming off a no-decision against the Reds, as he went five and one third innings, giving up four earned runs on six hits, in the Brewers’ 5-4 lost. He will be trying to improve his record while trying to keep the Phillies from getting any closer in the wild card race.

The Phillies are now trailing the Mets in the East by two and a half games as they spilt a doubleheader with the Braves. They are five games ahead of the Marlins as they defeated the Nationals. In the Wild Card chase, they now trail the Brewers by two games as they prepare to finish their series. They are ahead of the Astros by half a game as they prepare to finally play the Cubs while they are five games ahead of the Cardinals as they lost to the Pirates. The Phillies will be trying to sweep the doubleheader so that they can leave Philadelphia tied for the Wild Card lead and close to the Mets in the East.

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