Results tagged ‘ Extra-Base Hits ’

Ryan Howard’s two-homer night help rocket the Phils into a 9-6 victory over the Nats, back into first place in the NL East.

Ryan Howard’s two massive home runs, a solo shot and a team record setting grand-slam home run, help leads the Phils to a 9-6 win over the lowly Nationals. The Phils, meanwhile, regain first place from the Mets.

The Nationals took the lead in the second as, with two men on, and one man out, Wil Nieves hits a two run double, knocking in Josh Willingham, who had earlier singled, and had moved up to second on Alberto Gonzalez’s single, and Gonzalez, who had just singled, giving the Nats a 2-0 lead. Two batters later, with Nieves still on second, and now with two men out, Anderson Hernandez hits an RBI single, knocking in Nieves, who beat the throw to the plate, giving the Nats a 3-0 lead, while Hernandez would move up to second on the throw. The Phils would get a run back in their half of the second as Ryan Howard hits a lead-off home run, his thirteenth home run of the year, cutting the Nats’ lead to 3-1. In the third, with a runner on second, and one man out, Jimmy Rollins hits an RBI single, scoring Carlos Ruiz, who had earlier walked, and had moved up to second on Cole Hamels’ sacrifice bunt, making it a 3-2 Nats’ lead. After Rollins stole second base, the Phils loaded the bases on a Shane Victorino walk and a Chase Utley infield single. Ryan Howard then clears them with a 475-ft monster to right for a grand-slam home run, his fourteenth home run of the year, his third grand-salm of the season, and the eighth grand-slam of his career, setting a new franchise record, as he scored Rollins, Victorino and Utley before him, giving the Phils a 6-3 lead. In the fourth, the Nats would get one of the runs back, as, with one man on, and nobody out, Gonzalez hits an RBI triple, knocking in Austin Kearns, who had earlier walked, making it a 6-4 Phils lead. The Phils would get the run back in their half of the inning as, with a runner on second, and one man out, Hamels hits an RBI double, knocking in Ruiz, who had earlier doubled, giving the Phils a 7-4 lead. In the sixth, with a man on, and two men out, pinch hitter Ronnie Belliard hits a pinch hit two-run home run, scoring Kearns, who had earlier singled, had gone to second when Gonzalez was hit by the pitch, and had gone over to third on Nieves’ double play, 5-4-3, wiping out Gonzalez at second, making it 7-6 Phils. The Phils would get those two runs back in their half of the sixth as, with the bases loaded, via a walk to pinch hitter Greg Dobbs, a double by Victorino, which sent Dobbs to third, and a walk to Utley, with two men out, Howard would reach base on a fielding error by second baseman Hernandez, allowing both Dobbs and Victorino to score, and Utley to reach third, as the Phils take a 9-6 lead. That would be the final score as the Phillies’ bullpen shut down the Nats for the final three innings, with Brad Lidge notching his eleventh save of the year as he pitched a scoreless ninth.

Cole Hamels got the victory as he pitched six innings, giving up six runs on eight hits, a walk and a hit batter, while he struck out seven. His record is now 3-2 with a 5.21 ERA. Scott Eyre recorded his ninth hold of the year as he pitched a third of an inning, giving up two hits. Clay Condrey pitched two-thirds of an inning, recording his fourth hold of the season, as he struck out a batter. Ryan Madson recorded his eleventh hold of the year as he pitched a 1-2-3 inning, striking out two. Brad Lidge recorded his eleventh save of the season as he gave up only a hit, while striking out a batter. Shairon Martis took the lost as he pitched only four innings, giving up seven runs on seven hits and two walks, while striking out only one. His record is now 5-1 with a 5.62 ERA. Jason Bergmann pitched a scoreless inning. Mike MacDougal pitched two-thirds of an inning, giving up two runs on a hit and a walk. Ron Villone, Julian Taverez, Kip Wells and Jesus Colome combined for two and a third scoreless innings, giving up two hits (Tavarez (1), Colome (1)), a walk (Villone) and two hit batters (Tavarez (1), Colome (1)), while striking out four (Tavarez (1), Colome (3)) between them.

The Phillies had ten hits, with Jimmy Rollins, Shane Victorino and Ryan Howard leading the way with two hits each, with both of Howard’s hits being home runs. Chase Utley, Jayson Werth, Carlos Ruiz and Cole Hamels had the Phils’ other four hits. Besides Howard’s five RBIs, Hamels and Rollins both knocked in a run. The Phils had six extra-base hits, four doubles and two home runs. The Phils also stole five bases, with Utley, Rollins, Victorino, Ruiz and Werth each stealing a base. The win gives the Phils a series win, as they now go for the series sweep against the Nationals.

The Phillies (27-20, 1st) will conclude their three-games home stand with an afternoon game against the Nationals (13-35, 5th) that will be played at Citizens Bank Park. The game will start at 1:35 pm Eastern. The Phillies will send to the mound Jamie Moyer (3-5, 7.42), who is coming off a lost against the Marlins on May 25, where he went six innings, giving up four runs on seven hits and two walks, while striking out five, in the Phils’ 5-3 lost. He is still looking for his 250th career win, and for his first victory in over a month. The Nationals will counter with John Lannan (2-4, 4.11), who is coming off a lost on May 25 to the Mets, as he pitched five innings, giving up five runs on eight hits and four walks, in the Nats’ 5-2 lost. He will be trying to keep the Phils from sweeping the Nats. The Phillies will be trying to leave home with a winning home stand before going back onto the road, where they have the best record in baseball.

A sixteen-hit attack and a strong effort by J.A. Happ leads to a Phillies win over the hapless Nationals, 5-4.

A strong start by J.A. Happ and a sixteen-hit attack by the Phillies’ offense would lead to a Phils’ victory over the last place Nationals, 5-4.

The Nats took a quick 1-0 lead in the second, as Josh Willingham hits a lead-off home run, his seventh home run of the season. The Phils tied the game up at one-all in their half of the second as, with two men on, and one man out, Carlos Ruiz hits an RBI double, knocking in Jayson Werth, who had earlier singled, and had moved up to second on Pedro Feliz’s single, while sending Feliz, who had earlier singled, over to third. The Phils would take the lead in the third as, with two men on, and one man out, Raul Ibanez hits a two-run single, scoring Shane Victorino, who had earlier singled, and had moved on to third on Chase Utley’s double, and Utley, who had earlier doubled, giving the Phils a 3-1 lead. Two batters later, with Ibanez still on first and now with two men out, Feliz hits an RBI triple, knocking in Ibanez, making it a 4-1 Phils’ lead. The Phils would increase their lead in the fourth as, with runners on the corners, and no one out, Utley hits into a 4-6 force out, knocking in Jimmy Rollins, who had earlier doubled and had gone over to third on Victorino’s single, while Victorino, who had earlier singled, was forced out at second base for the inning’s first out, while Utley was safe at first on the play, giving the Phils a 5-1 lead. The Nats would come back in the sixth as, with two men on, and one man out, Josh Bard hits a two-run double, scoring Willingham, who had earlier singled, and had moved up to second when Ryan Zimmerman was hit by the pitch, while sending Zimmerman, who had earlier been hit by a pitch, over to third, cutting the Phils’ lead down to 5-2. One batter later, the Nats would cut the lead down further to 5-3 Phils, as Anderson Hernandez hits an RBI single, scoring Zimmerman from third, before a Werth fielding error on the play allows Bard to score as well, turning it into a 5-4 Phils’ lead, while Hernandez would move up to second base on the error. But that would be the game, as the Phillies’ bullpen would shut the Nats down for the last three innings, with Brad Lidge nailing down his tenth save in the ninth.

J.A. Happ got the win as he pitched five and a third strong innings, giving up three runs on three hits and three walks, while striking out five. His record is now 3-0 with a 3.00 ERA. Chad Durbin pitched two-thirds of an inning, as he recorded his fourth hold, as he gave up an unearned run on two hits, while he struck out a batter. Scott Eyre pitched a 1-2-3 inning, as he recorded his eighth hold. Ryan Madson recorded his tenth hold as he pitched a scoreless inning, giving up just one hit and a walk, while striking out one. Brad Lidge recorded his tenth save as he pitched a 1-2-3 ninth, striking out two batters. Ross Detwiler took the lost as he went four innings, giving up five runs on ten hits and a walk, as he struck out two. His record is now 0-1 with a 4.80 ERA. Jason Bergmann, Ron Villone, Mike MacDougal, Joe Beimel and Julian Tavarez combined for four scoreless innings, giving up six hits (Bergmann (1), Villone (2), MacDougal (1), Beimel (2)) and a walk (Beimel), while striking out three Phils (Bergamman, MacDougal and Beimel with a stikeout each).

The Phillies collected sixteen hits in the game, with all of the regulars getting at least one hit. Shane Victorino led the way with four hits as he raised his batting average to .293. Jimmy Rollins, Raul Ibanez, Jayson Werth, Pedro Feliz and Carlos Ruiz then followed with two hits each. Chase Utley and Ryan Howard got the other two Phils’ hits. Ibanez knocked in two of the Phils’ runs, while Utley, Feliz and Ruiz each knocked in a run. The Phils had seven extra-base hits in the game, six doubles and a triple.

The Phillies (26-20, 2nd) continue their weekend series with the Nationals (13-34). The game will start at 7:05 pm Eastern and will be played at Citizens Bank Park. The Phils’ starter will be their ace Cole Hamels (2-2, 4.68), who is coming off his best start of the season on May 24 against the Yankees, as he went six strong innings, giving up just two runs, on eight hits, while striking out five, in the Phils’ 5-4 extra-inning win. He will be going after his third win of the season. The Nats will counter with Shairon Martis (5-0, 4.86), who is coming off a no-decision against the Orioles on May 24, as he went six innings, giving up five runs on seven hits and two walks, as he struck out two, in the Nats’ 8-5 win , He will be going for his sixth win of the year. The Phillies will be trying to win their first series at home since their earlier home series win against these same Nationals.

Brad Lidge is able to stop a Marlins’ rally in the ninth, preserving the win for Joe Blanton, as the Phils defeat the fish, 5-3.

Joe Blanton pitched seven shut out innings, which was almost wasted in the ninth until Brad Lidge was able to come in and shut the door, redeeming himself for his two blown weekend saves as the Phils held on the defeat the pesky fish, 5-3.

The Phils took the lead in the first, as, with the bases loaded, via Jimmy Rollins reaching first on a Hanley Ramirez’s throwing error, a double by Shane Victorino, sending Rollins over to third base, and a walk to Chase Utley, and nobody out, Ryan Howard received an RBI walk, forcing in Rollins, giving the Phillies a 1-0 lead, while moving both Victorino and Utley up a base. One batter later, Raul Ibanez would make it 2-0 Phils as he hits a sacrifice fly, for the inning’s first out, scoring Victorino from third, while sending Utley on to third. After a wild pitch sends Howard to second, and Jayson Werth strikes out for the inning’s second out, Pedro Feliz hits a two outs RBI single, scoring Utley, giving the Phils a 3-0 lead, while sending Howard over to third base. The Phils would add to their lead in the sixth as, with a runner on first, and two men out, Victorino hits an RBI double, scoring Rollins, who had been safe at first on a force out, 5-4, as Phils’ starter Joe Blanton, who had reached base earlier on a walk, was out at second, but not before disrupting Marlins’ second baseman Dan Uggla’s throw to first base with a take-out slide, making it 4-0 Phils. In the seventh, after Joe Blanton had finished his strong effort by striking out his eleventh Marlin batter, the Phils added an insurance run, as with one man on and two men out, Feliz hits an RBI double, scoring Werth, who had earlier doubled. That would turn out to be important in the top of the ninth. With one man out, Chad Durbin walks Uggla, putting a man on first. Cody Ross follows with a single, putting runners on first and second, as Uggla moved up a base. Chris Coghlan then walks, loading the bases. Charlie Manuel then took out Durbin and brought in Scott Eyre to face pinch hitter Ross Gload. Gload hits a grounder to first, that was scooped up by Howard. The play should’ve ended the ballgame with a double play, 3-6-3, but instead, Howard threw the ball pass Rollins, thus allowing both Uggla and Ross to score, cutting the Phils’ lead down to 5-2, while sending Coghlan all the way to third, and Gload to second, with still one man out. Manuel then came back out and called for Brad Lidge. He then walks Emilio Bonifacio, reloading the bases. Lidge then got Jeremy Hermida to ground out, 3-1, for the inning’s second out, while Coghlan scored, making it a 5-3 Phils’ lead, while sending Gload to third and Bonifacio to second. Lidge then ended the game by striking out Wes Helms, recording his ninth save of the year.

Joe Blanton got the win as he pitched seven shut out innings, giving up only five hits and two walks, while striking out eleven batters. His record is now 3-3 with a 6.14 ERA. Ryan Madson pitched a 1-2-3 inning, striking out one. Chad Durbin pitched a third of an inning, giving up three runs, only one of which was earned, on one hit and two walks. Scott Eyre pitched to one batter, who got on base on an error. Brad Lidge picked up the save, his ninth of the season, as he pitched two-thirds of an inning, giving up just a walk, while striking out one. Andrew Miller took the lost, pitching six innings, giving up four runs, only two of which were earned, on seven hits and four walks, while he struck out four. His record is now 1-2 with an ERA of 4.55. Christopher Leroux pitched two innings in relief, giving up a run on three hits.

The Phillies collected ten hits in the game. Shane Victorino got the most hits as he went four for five, including two doubles, as he knocked in a run, while also scoring one, raising his season average to .284. Pedro Feliz was next with two hits, while Chase Utley, Raul Ibanez, Jayson Werth and Carlos Ruiz had the other four hits. Ryan Howard and Ibanez both knocked in a run, while Feliz would knock in two, to go along with Victorino’s RBI.

The Phillies (25-19, 1st) will tonight conclude their three-games series with the Marlins (21-26, 4th). The game will be played at Citizens Bank Park, and will start at 7:05 pm. The Phillies’ starter will be Brett Myers (4-2, 4.34), who is coming off his best start of the season as he tamed the Yankees on May 22, pitching eight innings, giving up just three runs on eight hits, while striking out five, in the Phillies’ 7-3 win. He will be going for his fourth straight victory. The Marlins will counter with Burke Badenhop (2-2, 5.75), who is coming off a no-decision against the Rays on May 23, where he pitched an inning and a third in relief, giving up a run on three hits and a walk, in the Marlins’ 10-3 lost. He will be out there trying to tame the Phils’ bats. The Phils will be trying to win their fourth straight series, while preparing to meet the lowly Nationals on Friday. They still lead the Mets by half a game. 

Powered by four home runs, Brett Myers pitched the Phils to a 7-3 victory over the Bronx Bombers.

Helped by four home runs, Brett Myers would pitch eight strong innings as the Phils defeated the New York Yankees in the New Yankees Stadium, 7-3.

The Phillies took a quick 1-0 lead on the game’s first pitch as Jimmy Rollins hits a lead-off home run, his third home run of the season. In the second, the Phils increased their lead as, with one man on, and one man out, Carlos Ruiz hits a two-run home run, his first home run of the year, knocking in Matt Stairs, who had earlier singled, to give the Phils a 3-0 lead. In the fifth, with one man on, and two men out, Jayson Werth hits a two-run home run, his eighth home run of the year, scoring Ryan Howard, who had earlier hit into a force out, 1-6, wiping out Raul Ibanez, who had earlier walked, at second base, to make it a 5-0 Phils lead. The Yankees finally got onto the board in the sixth as, with two men out, Alex Rodriguez hits a solo home run, his sixth home run of the year, making it a 5-1 Phils’ lead. The Phils got that run back in the seventh, as, with one man out, Ibanez hits a solo home run, his sixteenth home run of the season, giving the Phils a 6-1 lead. The Phils tacked on another run in the eighth as, with two men on, and one man out, Chase Utley hits an RBI single, scoring Pedro Feliz, who had earlier singled, and had gone on to second on Rollins’ single, making it a 7-1 Phils’ lead, while he sent Rollins, who had just singled, over to second. In the bottom half of the eighth, the Yanks would get a run back as Derek Jeter hits a lead-off home run, his sixth home run of the season, making it a 7-3 Phillies’ lead. Two batters later, with one man out, Mark Teixeira would hit a solo home run of his own, his twelfth home run of the season,  cutting the Phillies’ lead down to 7-3. But that would be the final score as Ryan Madson would shut down the Yanks in the ninth inning.

Brett Myers got the win as he pitched eight strong innings, giving up three runs on eight hits, while striking out five. His record is now 4-2 with a 4.34 ERA. Ryan Madson pitched a 1-2-3 ninth, striking out a batter. A. J. Burnett took the lost, as he went six innings, giving up five runs on eight hits, two walks and a hit batter, while he struck out seven. His record is now 2-2 with a 5.28 ERA. Chien-Ming Wang pitched three innings of relief, giving up two runs on six hits and a walk, as he struck out two.

The Phils had fourteen hits in the game, with Carlos Ruiz leading the way with four hits, raising his average to .271. Jimmy Rollins, Raul Ibanez, Jayson Werth and Shane Victorino followed with two hits each. Chase Utley, Matt Stairs and Pedro Feliz had the other three Phillies’ hits.Ryan Howard was the other starter not to get a hit. Werth and Ruiz had two RBIs each, while Rollins, Ibanez and Utley each knocked in a run. The Phils had five extra-base hits in the game, four home runs and a triple. The Phillies have now won seven of the eight games that they have so far played on this road trip as they go for their third straight road series win this afternoon.

The Phillies (23-17, 1st) continue their three-games weekend series with the Yankees (24-18, 3rd American League East), with an afternoon game that will be televised nationally on Fox Sports. The game will begin at 4:10 pm Eastern at the new Yankees Stadium. The Phillies will send to the mound J.A. Happ (2-0, 2.49), who will be making his first start of the season. His last appearance, as a reliever, was made on May 15, as he pitched two innings, giving up no runs on one hit and a walk, while striking out three, as he picked up the win, in the Phils’ 10-6 extra-innings win. Happ will be going out there to prove that he deserved to be the team’s fifth starter. The Yankees will counter with Andy Pettitte (4-1, 4.18), who is coming off a win against the Twins on May 18, where he went six and two-thirds innings, giving up four runs on twelve hits and one walk, while striking out three, in the Yanks’ 7-6 win. He will be going for his fifth win of the season. The Phillies will be going out to try and win their eighth game in their ten games road trip, while showing that they are a team to be respected.

Phillies unlease the lumber as they crush the Reds, 12-5, as they continue a very successful road trip.

The Phillies scored twelve runs yesterday as they crushed the Reds, 12-5, giving them their second straight series win on the road, as they head on to New York for their first visit to the New Yankees Stadium for an Interleague series with the Yankees.

The Phillies took a quick 1-0 lead in the first as, with two men on, and nobody out, Raul Ibanez hits an RBI ground out, 4-3, scoring Jimmy Rollins, who had earlier singled, and had gone to third on Chase Utley’s double. The Phils made it 3-0 in the second as, with two men on, and two outs, Utley hits a two-run single, knocking in Phils’ starter Joe Blanton, who had earlier walked, had gone to second on Rollins’ single, and then went to third on Reds’ catcher Ryan Hanigan’s throwing error when he tried to pick him off second, and Rollins, who had earlier singled, and had gone to second with a stolen base, his 300th career steal. Ibanez made it 4-0 Phillies with an RBI double, scoring Utley. In the third, with two men out, Greg Dobbs hits a solo home run, his first home run of the season, making it a 5-0 Phillies’ lead. In the fifth, once again with two men out, Utley hits a solo home run of his own, his eleventh home run of the year, and his third hit of the game, to give the Phils a 6-0 lead. In the Reds’ fifth, they would finally get to Blanton, who was breezing through their lineup before then. With two men on, and one out, Wily Taveras hits an RBI single, scoring Hanigan, who had earlier singled, had move on to second on Paul Janish’s single, and had gone to third on Ramon Ramirez’s sacrifice bunt, making it a 6-1 Phillies’ lead, while sending to third Hanigan, who had earlier singled and had went to second on Ramirez’s sac bunt. Adam Rosales followed him with an RBI ground out, 6-3, scoring Janish, making it a 6-2 Phils’ lead, while moving Taveras up to second base. Two batters later, after Jay Bruce was walked, Brandon Phillips cut the Phils’ lead down to 6-5 as he hits a three-run home run, his seventh home run of the year, scoring both Taveras and Bruce. The Phils would get a run back in the sixth, as, with two men on base, and one out, Utley hits a sacrifice fly, scoring Carlos Ruiz, who had earlier walked, had gone to third on Rollins’ single, beating the throw to third, as the Phils increased their lead to 7-5. The Phils would break the game open in the seventh. Ryan Howard started the inning off by hitting a lead-off home run, his tenth home run of the year, making it an 8-5 Phillies’ lead. Later in the inning, with two men on, and two men out, pinch hitter Pedro Feliz hits a two-run pinch hit double, scoring Shane Victorino, who had earlier doubled, and had gone to third on Ruiz’s ground out, and Dobbs, who had been intentionally walked and had moved up to second on Ruiz’s ground out, giving the Phils a 10-5 lead. Rollins then made it an 11-5 Phils’ lead, as he hits an RBI single, his fourth hit of the game, scoring Feliz, who beat the throw to the plate, as Rollins moved up to second on the throw. The Phils made it 12-5 in the eighth, as Ibanez hits a lead-off home run, his fifteenth home run of the season. That would be the final score as Sergio Escalona came in and pitched a 1-2-3 ninth.

Joe Blanton got the victory, although going only five innings, giving up five runs on seven hits and a walk, as he struck out four. His record is now 2-3 with a 7.11 ERA. Clay Condrey pitched a scoreless inning as he recorded his third hold, giving up only one hit and a walk. Scott Eyre, Chan Ho Park and Sergio Escalona each pitched a scoreless inning, giving up only a hit among them (Eyre) and three walks (Eyre (1) and Park (2)), while they struck out 2 (Eyre (1), Park (1)). Micah Owings took the lost as he went only three innings, giving up five runs on six hits and three walks, while striking out only three. Ramon Ramirez pitched two and a third innings, giving up  two runs on one hit and a walk, while striking out three. Daniel Ray Herrera pitched two-thirds of an inning, giving up a run on two hits. Jared Burton pitched an inning, giving up three runs on three hits and a walk, as he struck out two. Mike Lincoln pitched an inning, giving up a run on one hit, while striking out one. David Weathers pitched an inning, giving up no runs on one hit, as he struck out two.

The Phillies had fourteen hits, with Jimmy Rollins leading the way with four, followed by Chase Utley with three. Raul Ibanez followed them with two hits of his own. Ryan Howard, Shane Victorino, Greg Dobbs, Carlos Ruiz and Pedro Feliz had the other five Phils’ hits. The Phillies had nine extra-base hits in the game, five doubles and four home runs, all solo shots. Utley had four RBIs, followed by Ibanez with three. Feliz knocked in two runs, while Rollins, Howard and Dobbs knocked in a run apiece. The Phillies also had two stolen bases, one by Rollins, his 300th career stolen base as a Phil and one by Victorino. The Phillies, so far during their road trip, have gone 6-1, beating a good Reds team.

The Phillies (22-17, 1st) start interleague play tonight by going to New York City to face the Yankees (24-17, 3rd American League East) for the first time in their new ballpark, the New Yankees Stadium. The game will start at 7:05 pm Eastern. The Phillies will send to the mound Brett Myers (3-2, 4.50), who is coming off a win against the Nationals in the first game of a day-nght doubleheader on May 16, where he pitched seven very strong innings, giving up only two runs on three hits and two walks, while striking out eight, in the Phils’ 8-5 win. He will be looking to improve on his record, while trying to win his third start in a row. The Yankees will counter with A. J. Burnett (2-1, 5.02), who is coming off a no-decision against the Twins on May 17, where he went six and two-thirds innings, giving up two runs on six hits and six walks, while striking out seven, in the Yankees’ 3-2 win. He will be looking to increase his record. The Phillies will be going to the Yankees new home trying to do better than they did last season in interleague play.

Phillies scored seven runs in the ninth for the win after being kept quiet in the first eight.

After being able to score only two runs in the previous twenty-eight innings, the Phillies exploded for seven runs in the ninth inning off of Marlins’ reliever Matt Lindstrom, for a dramatic, 7-2, come from behind victory over the shocked Marlins.

The Marlins took a quick 3-0 lead in the first, as, with runners on the corners, and two men out, Dan Uggla hits a three-run home run, his second home run of the season, scoring John Baker, who had earlier singled and had gone to third on Ross Gload’s single, and Gload, who had earlier singled. That would remain the score for the next seven innings, as Phils’ starter Brett Myers would constantly pitch himself in and out of trouble until he was relieved in the seventh by Clay Condrey, who would then proceed to pitch two scoreless innings, while Marlins’ starter Josh Johnson would three hit the Phils for the first seven innings and Leo Nunez would keep them off the board in the eighth. But, everything suddenly changed in the top of the ninth. With Matt Lindstrom now pitching for the Marlins, the Phils’ bats finally came alive, with a little help from Lindstrom’s own wildness. After Ryan Howard started the inning off by making the inning’s first out, a 4-3 ground out, Jayson Werth got on base with a double to center. Raul Ibanez followed with a walk, putting runners on first and second, with one out. The next batter, pinch hitter Matt Stairs, then knocked in Werth with an RBI pinch hit single, making it a 3-1 Marlins’ lead, while sending Ibanez to third base. After Miguel Cairo went to first to pinch run for Stairs, Lou Marson got on base with a walk, loading the bases, as Cairo moved up to second. After pinch hitter Eric Bruntlett struck out for the inning’s second out, Jimmy Rollins got on base with a walk, forcing home Ibanez, cutting the Marlins lead down to 3-2, and sending Cairo to third and Marson to second, as the bases remained loaded. The next batter, Shane Victorino, then connected for a grand slam home run to right, his second home run of the season and his first career grand slam during the regular season, scoring Cairo, Marson and Rollins, as he gave the Phils a 6-3 lead. Chase Utley followed by hitting a solo home run, also to right field, to give the Phillies a 7-3 lead, as the Phils had batted around. Howard then followed with a double, just missing hitting it out of the park for back-to-back-to-back home runs. After Werth walked, Renyal Pinto, who had earlier been brought in to relieve Lindstrom, was finally able to end the inning as he got Ibanez to strike out swinging. In the bottom of the ninth, the Marlins tried to come back. With two outs, Hanley Ramirez hit a double, sending Alfredo Amezaga, who had started the inning off as a pinch hitter, and getting a walk, over to third. But Ryan Madson then ended the inning by getting Gload to strike out, swinging.

Brett Myers got a no-decision, as he pitched sixth strong innings, giving up only three runs on eight hits and six walks, while striking out five. Clay Condrey picked up the win as he pitched two scoreless innings, giving up just one walk. His record is now 3-0, leading the team in wins, with a low 1.86 ERA. Ryan Madson pitched a scoreless ninth, giving up just one hit and a walk, as he struck out the side. Josh Johnson also pitched a no-decision, throwing seven strong innings, giving up just three hits and two walks, as he struck out eight. Leo Nunez, pitched a scoreless inning, as he struck out three. Matt Lindstrom took the lose as he blew his second save of the year, as he gave up seven runs on four hits and three walks, while striking out only one batter, in two-thirds innings of work. His record is now 1-1 with a 10.80 ERA. Renyel Pinto pitched a third of an inning, giving up a hit and a walk, while striking out a batter.

The Phillies had eight hits in the game. Shane Victorino, Chase Utley, Ryan Howard, Jayson Werth, Raul Ibanez, Matt Stairs, Lou Marson and Brett Myers each had a hit, with Victorino and Utley (Home Runs), and Werth and Howard’s (Doubles) hits being extra-base hits. Victorino had four RBIs with his grand slam home run, Utley knocked in one with his solo shot, Stairs brought in a run with his pinch hit single, and Jimmy Rollins brought in the other run with his bases-loaded walk. Although he gave up a home run, Myers was able to keep the Phils in the game, getting himself out of constant jams. Clay Condrey pitched two good frames, giving up only a walk, thus allowing him to be the winning pitcher when the Phils had their ninth inning explosion. With this win, all of the Phils’ victories so  far this year has been of the coming from behind variety. The Phillies need to start dominating games early.

The Phillies (7-8, 3rd) continue their three-games series with the Marlins (11-5, 1st) at Dolphin Stadium in Miami, Flordia. The game will start tonight at 7:10 pm Eastern. The Phillies will send to the mound Chan Ho Park (0-0, 8.68), who is still looking for his first win, as he comes off his second straight no-decision as a starter, this time against the Padres on April 19, as he pitched five innings, giving up four runs on eight hits and a walk, while striking out three, in the Phillies’ dramatic 5-4 win in the ninth inning. He will be looking for his first win as a Phils’ pitcher. The Marlins will counter with Chris Volstad (2-0, 2.76), who is also coming of  a no-decision against the Nationals, also on April 19, as he went only four and one-third innings, giving up three runs on six hits and five walks, as he struck out five, in the Marlins’ 7-4 win. He will be looking for his third win of the season, while trying to end the Marlins’ present four-games slide. The Phillies will be looking for their second straight win and their second road series win.

Phillies’ eight-run seventh inning help lead to first victory of the season, 12-11, as Brad Lidge remains perfect in relief.

After trailing the Braves for the third straight game, the Phillies’ eight-run rally in the seventh inning lead to their first win of the 2009 season, as they defeat the Atlanta Braves, 12-11, ending the three-game series on a high note.

The Phillies began the afternoon by receiving their world series ring. After the ring ceremony, Joe Blanton started the game for the Phils, and right from the start was in for a long day as he gave up a two-out two-run home run to Brian McCann, his second home run of the young season, knocking in Yunel Escobar, who had earlier reached second base with a double, giving the Braves an early 2-0 lead. The Phils tied the game up in their half of the second as Raul Ibanez hit a two-run home run, his first homer as a Phil, and the team’s first home run of the season, scoring Ryan Howard, who had earlier doubled. The Braves retook the lead in the top of the third as they torched Blanton for five runs. After loading the bases via a single to Omar Infante, a walk to Kelly Johnson and another single to Escobar, with nobody out, McCann made the score 3-2 Braves by knocking in Infante with an RBI single, while moving Johnson and Escobar up to third and second respectively, leaving the bases loaded. After Casey Kotchman strikes out for the inning’ first out, Jeff Francoeur made it 5-2 Atlanta with a two-run single to center, knocking in both Johnson and Escobar, while McCann would move safely to third on Shane Victorino’s throw to home plate. Matt Diaz followed with a two-run double, scoring both Francoeur and McCann, giving the Braves a 7-2 lead. The Phils would get one of the runs back in the bottom half of the third, as Victorino, who had started the inning off with a triple, scored on an Infante throwing error of a Chase Utley ground ball to third base, making it 7-3 Atlanta. The Braves increased their lead to 9-3 in the fifth as rookie Jordan Schafer hit his second home run of his young career, a two-run shot to right, scoring Diaz, who had gotten on base earlier with a walk. Both runs came off of J.A. Happ, pitching in relief of Blanton, thus ending with one swing of the bat both the bullpen’s hitless and scoreless streak. The Braves added to their lead in the seventh, making it 10-3 Braves, as Chad Durbin gives up a bases loaded walk to Infante, forcing in Kotchman, who had earlier doubled and had moved over to third on Greg Norton’s walk, while moving Schafer to third, who had also walked, and moving Norton over to second base. Clay Condrey then came into the game in place of Durbin and got out of the inning by striking out Johnson. Now trailing 10-3, the offense decided to come to life. Victorino started off the Phils’ half of the seventh by grounding out, 5-3, for the inning’s first out. Utley followed with a single to center. Howard was then hit by the pitch, putting runners on first and second, as Utley moved up to second. The next batter, Jayson Werth, is then walked by Peter Moylan, who was pitching in relief of Eric O’Flaherty, loading the bases with still only one man out. Ibanez followed Werth with a single, knocking in Utley, as he collected his third RBI of the afternoon, making the score 10-4 Atlanta, while sending Howard over to third base, and Werth to second, leaving the bases loaded. Pedro Feliz then singled in Howard, making it 10-5 Braves, while Werth and Ibanez both moved up a base, leaving the bases loaded with Phils. Matt Stairs, pinch hitting for Carlos Ruiz, is given a four pitch walk, forcing in Werth with the third Phils’ run in the inning, reducing the Braves lead to 10-6, as the bases remained loaded. The next batter, pinch hitter Chris Coste, batting for Condrey, also walks, bringing home Ibanez, as the Phils now trailed 10-7, while the bases remained loaded for Jimmy Rollins, who became the ninth batter of the inning. Rollins received a four-pitch free pass, the third straight walk to a Phil batter, and the fourth walk of the inning, forcing in Feliz, as the bases stay loaded, making the score 10-8 Braves. The next batter, Victorino, followed with a single, scoring Stairs, making the score now 10-9 Atlanta, moving Coste and Rollins over to third and second base, respectively, as the bases remained loaded. The eleventh batter of the inning, Utley, walks, the fifth Phil to walk in the inning, tying the ballgame up at 10 all, as Coste crosses the plate, while Rollins and Victorino both moved up a base. Howard comes up to the plate, and with the count 1-1, hit the ball on a bounce towards Braves’ first baseman, Kotchman. Kotchman, having only one play, threw the ball over to relief pitcher Jorge Campillo, the fourth Braves reliever to pitch in the inning, who tagged the bag in front of Howard for the second out of the inning, as Rollins scored the go ahead run, giving the Phils their first lead of 2009, 11-10. Victorino and Utley both moved up a base on the play. Werth ended the inning by flying out to right. The Phils sent thirteen men to the plate, as they scored eight runs in the inning on four hits, five walks and a hit batter. Ryan Madson took over in the top of the eighth, pitching a strong 1-2-3 inning, throwing only seven pitches. The Phils added an insurance run in their half of the eighth, as Eric Bruntlett, pinch hitting for Madson, hit a sacrifice fly, scoring Ibanez, who had earlier walked and had gone to third on Feliz’s double, with nobody out, making it a 12-10 Phillies’ lead. In the ninth, Brad Lidge took the mound. Although he gave up a one-out solo home run to Diaz, his first home run of the season, Lidge recorded his first save of the 2009 season, as he struck out pinch hitter Garret Anderson for the final out, for the moment staying perfect in save opportunities as a Phil.

Joe Blanton received a no-decision as he got pummeled by the Braves, giving up seven runs on nine hits and two walks, while striking out six in four innings of work. J.A. Happ pitched two innings, giving up two runs on one hit and a walk, while he struck out two Braves. Chad Durbin pitched two-thirds of an inning, giving up a run on one hit and three walks. Clay Condrey received the win as he pitched a third of an inning, striking out the one man he would face. His record for 2009 is 1-0 with an ERA of 0.00. Ryan Madson pitched a 1-2-3 eighth inning, as he held the lead. Brad Lidge recorded his first save of the season as he pitched an inning, giving up a run on one hit, as he struck out one. Javier Vazquez also received a no-decision, as he pitched six innings for the Braves, giving up just three runs on five hits and four walks, as he struck out five batters. Eric O’Flaherty followed him, pitching only a third of an inning, as he gave up two runs on one hit. Peter Moylan pitched to four batters, getting none of them out, as he gave up four runs on two hits and two walks. Blaine Boyer took the lost as he faced only two batters, with both of them scoring, as he gave up two runs on no hits and two walks. Jorge Campillo blew the save, giving up a run on two hits and two walks, in two-thirds of an inning. Jeff Bennett pitched a scoreless inning, giving up a hit while striking out a batter.

The Phillies had eleven hits in the game, with Victorino, Utley, Ibanez and Feliz each getting two hits. Howard, Ruiz and Coste had the other three hits. Ibanez knocked in three runs, Utley brought home two, while Feliz, Stairs, Coste, Rollins, Victorino, Howard and Bruntlett each knocked in a run, with Bruntlett’s coming in on a sacrifice fly. The Phillies collected five extra-base hits in the game, three doubles (Howard, Utley and Feliz), a triple (Victorino) and a home run (Ibanez). After three games, Utley leads the team in hitting with a .364 batting average, followed by Ruiz with a pleasently surprising .333 average.

The Phils (1-2) are off today. Their next game will be on the road against the Colorado Rockies (2-1) in Denver, Colorado, at Coors Field. The game will start at 2:10 pm Mountain Time tomorrow afternoon. The Phillies will send to the mound their ace, Cole Hamels, who ended 2008 with a record of 14-10 in 33 starts with an ERA of 3.09 in the regular season. His record for this season is presently 0-0 with a -.– ERA. The Rockies will oppose him with Jason Marquis, who last season had a record of 11-9 for the Chicago Cubs, with an ERA of 4.53 in 29 games (28 of which were starts). His record for this season is also 0-0 with a -.– ERA. The Phillies will be trying to even their season record tomorrow.

Phils have now dropped two in a row as the bats are unable to knock in a run as they lose to the Braves, 4-0.

The Phillies have lost their second straight game in the young season as the bats resurrect a major problem from last season, the inability to knock in runs after putting men in scoring position.

Jamie Moyer, starting the game for the Phils, ran into trouble early, as Braves’  lead-off man Kelly Johnson, hammers his first pitch, a cutter, into the right field seats, for his first home run of the season, giving Atlanta a quick 1-0 lead. Three batters later, Chipper Jones, who had earlier reached second on a double with one man out, scored from second base on a Chase Utley fielding error of a Brian McCann grounder, making it 2-0 Braves. The Braves added a run in the fourth inning, as, with runners on first and third, with two outs, Kelly Johnson singled in Jeff Francoeur, who had earlier singled and had reached third on an infield single by Casey Kotchman that Jimmy Rollins was unable to make a play on, increasing Atlanta’s lead to 3-0. The next batter, Yunel Escobar, followed with a single to left, but a strong throw from Raul Ibanez to home plate would cut down Kotchman, as Carlos Ruiz successfully blocked home plate before supplying the tag, for the inning’s final out. Then in the fifth, Jones knocked in the Braves’ final run of the evening as he hit Moyer’s first pitch, another cutter, deep into left field for his first home run of the year, and the Braves’ fifth homer of the young season. The Phillies’ bullpen then took over in the sixth, and, like it did on Sunday night, it would shut down the Braves’ offense for the rest of the night. Meanwhile, the Phillies were not having any luck with either Jair Jurrjens or the Braves’ bullpen. Although they would get a few men into scoring position, they would be unable to get the key hit that they needed to bring them home as they ended up being six-hit by Atlanta.

Jamie Moyer took the lost as he pitched five innings, giving up four runs on eight hits and two walks, as he struck out two. His record is now 0-1 with an ERA of 7.20. Chan Ho Park pitched an inning of relief, giving up no hits. Jack Taschner followed him, pitching two straight 1-2-3 innings. Clay Condrey also pitched a 1-2-3 inning, with two strike outs, as the bullpen has so far pitched seven shut out innings, giving up no hits or walks. Jair Jurrjens picked up the win for the Braves, as he went five and two-thirds shut out innings, scattering four hits, along with three walks, while striking out two. His record is now 1-0 with a 0.00 ERA. Jeff Bennett then followed him in relief, giving up a hit to the only batter that he would face. Eric O’Flaherty then came in and pitched an inning and a third of shut out ball, giving up a hit. Rafael Soriano and Mike Gonzalez then came in to each pitch a scoreless inning, with Soriano striking out a batter.

Among the Phillies batters, Utley and Ryan Howard would each get two hits in the game, all singles. Ibanez and Ruiz had the Phils other two hits, with Ibanez’s hit being a double, the Phils only extra-base hit of the night. The Phils also had four walks, But, they were unable to knock in any runs, as they left eleven men on base, going 0-7 with runners in scoring position, a major problem for the team last season.

The Phillies (0-2) will conclude their short three-game home stand with the Braves (2-0) later this afternoon, as the Phillies receive their World Series rings. The game will begin at 3:05 pm Eastern time at Citizens Bank Park, with the ring ceremony to be performed at 2:15 pm. Starting for the Phillies will be Joe Blanton, who last year went 4-0 for the Phils (9-12 overall) with a 4.20 ERA. His record for the 2009 season is presently 0-0 with a -.– ERA. His opponent will be Javier Vazquez, who in 2008 went 12-16 for the Chicago White Sox with a 4.67 ERA. This season his record is presenty 0-0 with a -.– ERA. The Phils will be looking to salvage a win at home before they go on the road for their first road trip of the young season, meeting the Rockies in Colorado for three weekend games and then going on to Washington, D.C. to face the Nationals for three games at the start of next week.

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 8: The Phillies finished in third place in the NL, inspite of losing their manager Harry Wright for most of the season as he goes blind.

The Phillies would start the 1890 season with a major problem. Before the season even starts, as they start to officially call themselves the Phillies, the club would lose several of its players to the teams of the Players’ League, including a new team that the rebellious league had set up in Philadelphia, the new Philadelphia Quakers. This new team would challenge not only the Phils but also the American Association’s Philadelphia franchise, the Philadelphia Athletics, to see which team would reign surpreme in the Philadelphia baseball world.

As the National League finds itself unable to destroy the upstart league through the courts, as New York Supreme Court Justice Morgan J. O’Brien rules on January 28 in favor of John Montgomery Ward, formerly a star pitcher for the New York Giants and now a Hall of Famer, in his reserve clause case against the league, they decide to destroy it on the playing field, despite losing half of the people who had played for National League teams the previous season before the start of the regular season. The league would set things up so that they would end up playing most of their games on the same day as would the teams of their Players’ League opponents, beginning with opening day, April 19.

The Phillies’ opponents for 1890 would include the two franchises that had joined the National League from the weakening American Association, after the previous season, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms and the Cincinnati Reds, replacing the now defunct Washington Nationals and Indianapolis Hoosiers franchises, along with the Beaneaters, the Giants, the Alleghenys, the Spiders and the Chicago franchise, which has before the season changed its nickname from the White Stockings to the Colts. Every member of the league, except for Cincinnati, would face a challenge from a Players’ League franchise, while only Brooklyn and Philadelphia would also face teams from the more friendly American Association. The Phillies would continue to play their home games at the Philadelphia Base Ball Grounds, while Harry Wright would begin his seventh season as the team’s manager, trying to see if he can finally pilot the team to a league pennant.

The Phillies would begin their season on the road in April, playing four games against the previous season’s champ, the Giants, and one game against the former American Association champ, the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would win the season opener behind Kid Gleason, defeating the Giants 4-0. They would then lose the next game, 5-3, before winning the four- games series, 3-1, by defeating New York by the scores of 7-3 and 3-1, and landing in a three-way tie for first place with the Beaneaters and the Alleghenys. The Phils would then lose their game with the Bridegrooms, 10-0, ending their road trip with a record of 3-2 and landing in third place, trailing the Beaneaters by a game. They would then go back home to begin an eleven-games home stand with their eastern rivals the Giants (3), the Beaneaters (4) and the Bridegrooms (4). The Phillies would end the month of April by splitting the first two of their three games with the Giants, ending the month with a record of 4-3 while in a three-way tie with the Bridegrooms and Beaneaters for second place, as they all trailed the now leading Colts by half-a-game.

With the start of May, the Phillies would conclude their series with the Giants, winning the final game, and thus winning the series, 3-1, as they would end up in a four-way tie for first place with the Beaneaters, the Colts and the Reds, all four teams a full game ahead of the Alleghenys and the Bridegrooms. The Phils would then sweep their series with the Beaneaters, putting themselves in first place, a game-and-a-half ahead of the second place Colts. The Phillies would then win their sixth game in a row as they would defeat the Bridegrooms in the first game of their four-games series, 6-1. The Phils would then lose their next two games with Brooklyn, before winning the last game of the home stand, and splitting the series 2-2, while winning their home stand, 8-3, still in first place, but now leading the Colts by two full games. The Phils then go to Boston for a one-game series, which they would lose, 14-7, before coming back home for a long twenty-four games series against all of their league opponents that would last the rest of May and the early part of June. The Phillies would begin the home stand by losing their three-games series with the Reds, 1-2, leaving them just a half-game ahead of the Colts, as their western rival come into Philadelphia for a four-games series. The Phils would win the series, 2-1-1, including a suspended final game which had the Colts leading 10-8, which would end up leaving the Phillies still in first place, a game-and-a-half ahead of the Colts, the Bridegrooms and the Giants. The Phils would next face the Alleghenys for four games. They would sweep the series, including a doubleheader sweep on May 28, winning the games by the scores of 12-10 and 7-2, which would leave them still a game-and-a-half ahead of Brooklyn. The Phils would then end the month playing four games with the Spiders, including their second doubleheader of the month, played on May 30. After winning the first game of the series, they would be swept in the doubleheader, losing the two games by the score of 8-4 and 4-1, before winning the final game of the series, thus ending up splitting their series with Cleveland, 2-2. The Phillies would end the month of May with a 17-8 record, and with an overall record of 21-11-1, a game-and-a-half ahead of both the Reds and the Bridegrooms.

The Phillies would start June by winning their series with the Beaneaters, 2-1 and then with the Bridegrooms, also 2-1, before sweeping their three-games series with the Giants, ending the home stand with a winning record of 17-7, leaving them in first, but now only a-half-game ahead of the Reds. The Phillies would then go on the road for seven games with Boston (4) and Brooklyn (3). The Phils would lose the first game in their series with the Beaneaters, 8-5, having their four-games winning streak snapped, before losing the series overall, 1-3. They would then get swept by the Bridegrooms, becoming mired in a five-games losing streak, as they fall into third place, five-and-a-half games behind the Reds. The Phillies would then go back home for a four-games home stand with the Alleghenys. The Phils would win the short home stand 3-1, still in third, but now trailing by three-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go on an eleven-games road trip to Cleveland (4), Chicago (4) and Cincinnati (3) for the rest of the month and the start of July. The Phils would go to Cleveland, winning the series there, 3-1, as they now stood in second place, still three-and-a-half games behind the Reds. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where they would lose the first game of their series with the Colts, thus ending the month with a 13-11-1 record, and an overall record of 34-22-1, falling back into third place, but still three-and-a-half games behind the Reds.

The Phillies would start July off by winning two of their next three games with the Colts, ending the series with a split, before going on to Cincinnati for their first visit to the Queen City on the Ohio. The Phils would win their first road series against the Reds, 2-1, which would include a doubleheader split on July 4th, winning the first game 11-2, and then losing the ‘nightcap’, 7-1, thus ending the road trip with a record of 7-4, still trailing the Reds by three-and-a-half games, tied for second with the Bridegrooms. The Phils would then go back home for a fifteen-games home stand against the Reds, the Spiders, the Alleghenys, the Colts and the Alleghenys again, for five three-games series. The Phillies would start the home stand by winning their series with the Reds, 2-1, leaving them now just two-and-a-half games behind the Reds, while staying in third place. They would then sweep the other four series in their home stand, thus ending the home stand with a 14-1 record, returning to first place, now leading the second place Bridegrooms by two-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go back on the road, for nine games with the Spiders (2), the Colts (3) and the Reds (4). The Phils would begin the road trip by sweeping the Spiders, increasing their winning streak to fifteen games, while increasing their lead over the Bridegrooms to three games. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where their winning streak would be snapped by the Colts, 12-4, before they ended the series losing it, 1-2, with their lead over Brooklyn shrinking down to two games. The Phillies would then go on to Cincinnati, where they promptly lost the first game of their four-games series to the Reds, ending the month with a 21-6 record and an overall record of 55-28-1, now leading the Bridegrooms by just a game-and-a-half.

The Phils would start the month of August by losing two of three to the Reds, thus losing the series, 1-3, and the road trip with a 4-5 record, now in second place and a game behind the Bridegrooms, as the pennant race starts to heat up. The Phillies would then go back home for a short three-games home stand against the Giants (2) and the Beaneaters (1). The Phils would split their short series with the Giants, 1-1, before losing their game with Boston, ending the homestand, 1-2 and now three games behind Brooklyn, as they remain in second place. The Phillies then go back onto the road for nine games with Boston (2), New York (3) and Brooklyn (4). The Phillies go into Boston, where they are swept by the Beaneaters, dropping them into third, still three games behind Brooklyn. The Phils then go to New York, where they would lose the series to the Giants, 1-2, leaving them four games behind the Bridegrooms, before going into Brooklyn. The Phillies would then fall further behind Brooklyn, as they would lose three of their four games with the Bridegrooms, including a doubleheader lost on the 20, by the lopsided scores of 13-2 and 12-7, ending the road trip with a 2-7 record, now six games behind the first place Bridegrooms, as they fall into fourth place. The Phillies would then return home for a long nineteen-games home stand against all of their opponents for four straight three-games series (Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Chicago and Cincinnati), two straight two-games series (Boston and New York) and then a final three-games series with Brooklyn. The Phils would start the home stand by redeeming themselves as they would proceed to sweep first the Alleghenys and then the Spiders, putting them back into third place, now three games behind Brooklyn. They then had a setback as they got swept in turn by the Colts, ending August with a losing record of 10-14, and an overall mark of 65-42-1, in a technical tie for third place with the Reds, six games behind the league leading Bridegrooms.

The Phillies would start September off by spliting a doubleheader with the Reds on the 1, winning the first game, 2-1 and then losing the ‘nightcap’, 8-5, before winning the third game of the series to win the series, 2-1. They would then split their two-games series with the Giants, which was a doubleheader split on the 3, losing the first game, 9-6, then winning the ‘nightcap’, 9-5, leaving them in third place, eight games behind the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would then be swept by the Beaneaters in their two-games series, leaving them now eight and a half games behind Brooklyn, still in third place, as the Bridegrooms come to Philadelphia for three-games, giving the Phils one last chance to make up ground on first place Brooklyn. The Phils would proceed to sweep the Bridegrooms, winning the three games by scores of 4-3, 13-6 and 9-3, ending the home stand with a record of 12-7, now trailing the Bridegrooms by five-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go on the road for the final time, to play fifteen games in Boston (3), Cincinnati (4), Chicago (2), Pittsburgh (2) and Cleveland (4), for the rest of September and the start of October. The Phillies would start the road trip off by taking two of three from the Beaneaters, leaving them still five-and-a-half games behind Brooklyn and now a game behind the second place Beaneaters. The Philles would then lose three of four to the Reds, watching them stay in third place, six-and-a-half games behind Brooklyn, with only an outside chance to win the pennant. The Phils would then go to Chicago, where they would sweep the Colts, seeing them move up into second place over the Colts, six games behind the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would then go to Pittsburgh, where they would split the two-games series with the Alleghenys, losing the second game by the score of 10-1, thus ending the month with a record of 12-9 and an overall record of 77-51-1, now in third place, seven-and-a-half games behind the Bridegrooms, as Brooklyn clinches the pennant on that same day, September 30, by defeating the Spiders, 4-3 while the second place Colts would lose to the Beaneaters, 6-4.

The Phillies would end the season playing four games in October with the Spiders. After tying the first game, 2-2, they would win the next game, 5-4, before ending the season by being swept in an October 4 doubleheader, losing by the scores of 5-1 and 7-3, ending the month with a record of 1-2-1, the road trip with a record of 7-7-1, and ending the season with a record of 78-53-2, two-and-a-half games behind the second place Colts and nine games behind the league champ, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, so far the only Major League franchise to win a championship two years in a row in two difference leagues (AA 1889, NL 1890).

The Phillies would spend most of the year without their manager as Harry Wright would become blind on May 22. He would not be able to distinguish light from dark for ten days and would not return to manage the Phils until August 6. As Wright recovers, the Phillies would originally replace him with catcher Jack Clements, thus making him the fourth manager in Phillies’ history and the team’s second player-manager. Clements would be at the helm for only nineteen games, compling a record of 12-6-1 for a winning percentage of .667. Phillies co-owner, Al Reach, would replace him as the team’s fifth manager, leading the team for eleven games, compling a losing record of 4-7 for a winning percentage of .364. Reach then replaces himself as the team’s manager with shortstop Bob Allen, making him the team’s sixth manager and the third player-manager in franchise’s history. Allen would remain the team’s leader until Wright’s return, compling a record of 25-10 in thirty-five games, for a winning percentage of .714. Wright would return on August 6, leading the team during the final two-plus months of the pennant race, leading the Phils to its third third place finish, as he compiled a record of 36-31-1 in sixty-eight games, for a winning percentage of .537.

The Phillies would end up playing a total of 133 games, with a home/road split of 54-21-1 at home and 24-32-1 on the road, as 148,366 fans would come to watch them play at home. They would face the Spiders, the Reds and the Beaneaters twenty times each, the Colts and the Allghenys nineteen times, the Bridegrooms eighteen times and the Giants only seventeen times. The Phillies had winning records against four of their opponents, with their best record being against the Alleghenys, as they would go 17-2, followed by the Spiders at 14-5-1. They would have losing records with three teams, with their worst record being against the Bridegrooms, as they went 8-10, followed by both the Beaneaters and the Reds at 9-11. The Phillies would be 9-3 in shut outs, 17-9 in 1-run games and 30-17 in blowouts.

During the season, the Phillies would be either at the top, or near the top, in most offensive categories. The team would be first in doubles (220), batting average (.269) and on-base percentage (.342), second in hits (1267), walks (522), slugging percentage (.364) and stolen bases (335), third in run scored (823) and triples (78), fifth in at-bats (4707), sixth in home runs (23) and strikeouts (403), while also knocking in 631 RBIs, while 64 batters would be hit by the pitch. Meanwhile, the pitchers would also be near the top in most categories. They would be second in saves (2), shut outs (9), innings pitched (1194), home runs allowed (22) and strikeouts (507), fifth in complete games (122), and sixth in ERA (3.32), hits allowed (1210), runs allowed (707), and walks (486), as well as start 133 games, complete eleven games, allowed 440 earned runs, throw 45 wild pitches and commit two balks.

Team offensive leaders for the season would include Billy Hamilton in batting average (.325), on-base percentage (.430), runs scored (133), stolen bases (102), also leading the league in that category, and singles (137), being tied for the league lead with Cliff Carroll of the Chicago Colts. Clements would lead the team in slugging percentage (.472) and home runs (7). Allen would lead in games played (133), walks (87) and strikeouts (54), while being tied with Eddie Burke for triples with 11 each. Sam Thompson would be the team leader in at-bats (549), total plate appearances (599), hits (172), tied for the league lead with Jack Glasscock of the New York Giants, total bases (243), doubles (41), being the league leader, RBIs (102) and extra-base hits (54). Al Myers would lead in hit by the bat by being plunked 10 times.

Pitching wise, 1890 would be the coming out year for Kid Gleason, as he would be the team leader in most pitching categories. He would have the lowest ERA (2.63), win the most games (38, which is still the team’s single season record), highest win-lost percentage (.691), game played (60), saves (2), tied for the lead in that category with Dave Foutz of the Brooklyn Bridegrooms and Bill Hutchison of the Chicago Colts, innings pitched (506), strikeouts (222), games started (55), complete games (54), games finished (5), shutouts (6), hits allowed (479), earned runs allowed (148), while being tied with Tom Vickery for the team lead in home runs allowed (6). Vickery would also lead the team in walks (184), losses (22) and wild pitches (23). The Phils would only have two pitchers who would win twenty or more games, Gleason, setting a club record 38 wins and Vickery with 24.

As the Phillies continue to try to claim their first pennant, the National League Champ, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, would face the American Association Champ, the Louisville Colonels in a seven-games post-season series, that would end up as a 3-3-1 tie between the two teams. Meanwhile, the Players’ League folds, as the league’s idea of having a revenue sharing-pool between the players would backfire, as the owners of the league’s eight teams are unable to make enough of a profit to stay in business. This would force the owners to sell the interest of their teams to the owners of the National League, who would in the process regain many of the players that they had lost to the revolt, such as the Phillies regaining Ed Delahanty from the Cleveland Infants. Meanwhile, as the Players’ League dies, the American Association would kick the Athletics out of the fold, for violating the league’s constitution. The Athletics would then be replaced in the AA by the Quakers of the Players’ League, leaving the Phillies with a rival. Noone, however, would have any idea how damaging the players’ revolt would be to the AA until 1891.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com, Baseball-reference.org, Retrosheet.org

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 6: Falling back into third place, as Phils’ pennant hopes are dashed by a pre-season death.

As 1888 dawns, Harry Wright was starting his fifth year as the Phillies’ manager, leading a team that hoped to use their momentum from the previous season where they went 17-0-1 in their last 18 games, lead by their pitcher-second baseman Charlie Ferguson, to finally win the organization’s first pennant.

The 1888 National League would contain no changes among its membership. The Phillies’ opponents for the season would still be the Beaneaters, the Giants and the Nationals in the east and the Alleghenys, the Wolverines, the Hoosiers and the White Stockings in the west. The Phillies would continue to play their home games in the Philadelphia Base Ball Grounds.

But, before the season would officially start, the Phillies’ pennant chances would be struck a major blow, as their star player, Charlie Ferguson, would be struck down by tyhoid fever in spring training, and would die in late April, after the start of the 1888 season. The Phillies would spend the rest of the season wearing a black crepe upon their left shoulders in honor of their fallen comrade, as would their east coast opponents, the Giants, the Nationals and the Beaneaters. Ferguson’s place on the team would eventually be taken by future Hall of Famer, Ed Delahanty, who would be the oldest of five brothers who would all play the game professionally by the end of the 19th Century.

(For more information on Charlie Ferguson, go here: Philadelphia Phillies – The Players: Charlie Ferguson, the Phillies’ unknown first star.)

The Phillies, without Ferguson, would begin the 1888 season on April 20 at home with a four-games series against the Beaneaters, which would see the Phils being swept by Boston by scores of 4-3, 9-3, 3-1 and 7-1, with the Phils’ opening day pitcher being rookie pitcher Kid Gleason, who would later be the manager of the infamous 1919 Chicago White Sox. The Phils would then go to New York for four games with the Giants. After winning the first game 5-3, they would lose the next three, ending their short road trip, 1-3. They would then come back home for another short four-games series, this time with the Nationals, for the last day of April and the beginning of May. The Phillies would begin the series by winning the first game by the score of 3-1, ending April with a record of 2-7.

The Phils would begin May by continuing their short home stand with the Nationals. They would win the next two games, giving them a three games winning streak, before losing the final game in the home stand, giving them a 3-1 series win. The Phillies would then go west for a ten-games western road trip, playing against the Alleghenys for two games, the Wolverines for three, the Hoosiers for one and then their main western rival, the White Stockings, for four games, before going on to Boston for three more games for a thirteen-game road trip. Their two games series with their cross-state rival would end up being a two-games series win. The Phils would then move on to Detroit, where they would win the first game with the Wolverines, before losing the next two games, losing the series 1-2. They would then go into Indianapolis, losing the only game in that short series, before going on to Chicago, where they would lose the first game in their four-games series. The Phillies would then win the next two games, including the May 22 game which would feature the major league debut of Ferguson’s replacement, Ed Delahanty, thus breaking their four games losing streak, before losing the away game in their series, splitting their series with the White Stockings, 2-2. The Phils would then go to Boston, where they would sweep the three-games series from the Beaneaters, ending their road trip with a record of 8-5. The Phillies would then go home for a fifteen-games home stand for the last day of May and most of June, against the Wolverines (3), the White Stockings (4), the Alleghenys (4) and the Hoosiers (4). The Phillies would begin the home stand by playing a doubleheader with the Wolverines, which they would split, losing the opener by the score of 6-2 and then winning the ‘nightcap’ by the score of 5-4, thus ending May with a winning record of 11-7 and an overall win-lost record of 13-14.

The Phillies would then lose the final game of their series with the Wolverines, winning the series, 2-1. They would win the first game of their four-games series with the White Stockings, before being swept by them for three straight games, losing the series, 1-3. They would then win the next six games, sweeping their series with the Alleghenys, then winning the first two games with the Hoosiers, before splitting the final two games in the series, winning the series, 3-1, and the home stand, 10-5. The Phillies would then go to Washington for a four-games road trip, which they would lose to the Nationals, 1-3. They would then come back home for a two teams, seven-games, home stand with the Giants (4) and the Beaneaters (3) for the last days of June and the first day of July. The Phils would split their four-games series with the Giants, before winning the first two games of their series with Boston, ending the month with a winning record of 13-10, and an overall record of 26-24.

The Phillies would start July off by winning the final game of their series with Boston, sweeping the Beaneaters, and winning the home stand, 5-2. The Phils would then go on another western road trip, this time for twelve-games, for four three-games series with the White Stockings, the Hoosiers, the Wolverines and the Alleghenys, until the middle of the month. They would start the road trip off with a July 4 doubleheader with the White Stockings, losing the first game by the score of 10-8, ending their four-games winning streak, then winning the second game by the score of 6-5. They would then lose the away game, thus losing the series, 1-2. They would then go to Indianapolis to face the Hoosiers, losing that series, 1-2. They next went to Detroit, where they would end up being swept by the Wolverines, before going on to Pittsburgh, where they would sweep the Alleghenys, thus end the road trip with a record of 5-7. They would then return to Philadelphia for a six-games home stand of two three-games series with the Giants and the Nationals. After defeating the Giants in the opening game of their series, the Phillies would be defeated in the next five games, losing two in a row to the Giants and then being swept by the Nationals, ending the home stand with a 1-5 record. The Phillies would then go on an east coast road trip to face the Giants (3), the Beaneaters (3) and the Nationals (3), for the end of July and the beginning of August. The Phillies would start off the road trip by being swept by the Giants, with their losing streak going up to eight games, before finally ending the month by defeating the Beaneaters for the first two games of their series, thus snapping their losing streak, while ending the month with a losing record of 9-15 and an overall win-lost record of 35-39.

The Phillies would begin August by winning the final games of their series with the Beaneaters, thus sweeping the series. They would then go on to Washington, where they would lose the first game of the series, then win the next two games, winning the series, 2-1 and ending the road trip with a 5-4 record. They would then go back to Philadelphia for a sixteen-games home stand, which would include a two-games series with the White Stockings, three straight three-games series with the Wolverines, the Hoosiers and the Alleghenys, a two-games series with Boston and a three-games series with the Giants. The Phils would begin the home stand by splitting their series with the White Stockings, before sweeping their series with the Wolverines and the Hoosiers. The Phillies would then lose their series with the Alleghenys, 1-2, before being swept by the Beaneaters in their short two-games series. They then ended the home stand by losing their series with the Giants, after winning the first games in the series, 1-2, thus ending the home stand with a 9-7 record. The Phillies would then end the month by playing four of their next five games with the Nationals, two games in Washington and three more in Philadelphia. The Phillies would start things off by winning the two-games series in Washington, then winning the first game played in Philadelphia before having their three-games winning streak snapped by losing the final game to be played that month, thus ending the month of August with a 15-9 record and having a win-lost record of 50-48.

The Phillies would start off September by ending their road-home series with Washington, beating the Nationals, winning the series, 4-1. They would then go onto the road for twenty-one games for most of the month, facing the Giants (3), the Alleghenys (4), the Wolverines (4), the White Stockings (3), the Hoosiers (3) and the Beaneaters (4), They would start off their road trip by playing the Giants to an 0-0 tie, then losing the next two games for an 0-2-1 losing record. The Phillies would then split their series with the Alleghenys, before losing their series with the Wolverines, 1-3. They would then sweep their two three-games series, first with the White Stockings, including the September 18 game where their starter Ben Sanders would miss throwing a perfect game as he would give up a single in the ninth inning to Chicago pitcher Gus Krock in a 6-0 shut out, and then the Hoosiers, before losing their series with Boston, 1-3, ending the long road trip with a record of 10-10-1. The Phillies would then spend the rest of their season at home, facing the Alleghenys for two games in September and two more in October, followed by a three-games series with the Hoosiers, then two two-games series with the Wolverines and the White Stockings. The Phillies would end the month, and start the home stand, by losing the first two-games of their four games series to Pittsburgh, ending the month with an 11-12-1 record and with an overall record of 61-60-1.

The Phillies would then rebound and win their next two games with the Alleghenys, splitting the series. The Phillies would then sweep the Hoosiers, before splitting their series with the Wolverines and then ending the season with a sweep of their main western rivals, the White Stockings, with the last game being won via forfeit. The final home stand would end up a winning record of 8-3 and an overall season record of 69-61-1 for a .531 winning percentage, landing the Phillies back into third place, five and a half games behind second place Chicago and fourteen and a half game behind the league champ, the New York Giants.

The Phillies would play a total of 131 games, with a home-road record of 37-29 at home and 32-32-1 on the road. The Phillies had winning records against all but two of their opponents, with their best record being a 14-6 record against the Pittsburgh Alleghenys, followed by a 13-4 one with the Hoosiers. Their two losing records would be against the league champion Giants (5-14-1) and the Wolverines (7-11). The Phillies were 16-8 in shut outs, 28-16 in 1-run games and 19-17 in blowouts. The Phillies’ home attendence for 1888 would be 151,804 patrons.

The Phillies’ offense would in 1888 be ranked among the bottom of the league, being fourth in doubles (151), fifth in walks (268), sixth in runs scored (535), strikeouts (485), on-base percentage (.269) and slugging percentage (.290), seventh in hits (1021), triples (46), home runs (16), batting average (.225) and stolen bases (246) and eighth in at-bats (4528), as well as having 418 RBIs and having 51 hit batsmen. The Phillies’ pitchers would end the season being number one in saves (3), second in ERA (2.38), shut outs (16), hits allowed (1072), runs allowed (509), home runs allowed (26) and walks (196), fourth in strike outs (519), seventh in complete games (125) and eighth in innings pitched (1167), as well as finishing seven games, giving up 309 earned runs, throwing 50 wild pitches, hitting 25 batters and throwing 2 balks.

Among the team’s batting leaders, Jack Clements would lead the team in batting average, hitting .245. Jim Fogarty would lead the team in on-base percentage (.325), walks (53), strike outs (66) and stolen bases (58). George Wood would lead in slugging percentage (.342) and home runs (6). Sid Farrar would lead in games played (131), total bases (165), doubles (24), triples (7), RBIs (53) extra-base hits (32) and hit by the pitch (13), while being tied with Ed Andrews for the team’s lead in total plate appearances with 552. Andrews would also lead the team in at-bats (528), runs scored (75), hits (126), and singles (105). Among the team’s leader in pitching, Ben Sanders would lead the team in ERA (1.90), win-loss percentage (.655), and shut outs (8), also being tied for first in the league lead in that category with Tim Keefe of the Giants, as well as being tied with George Wood for the team’s lead in games finished with two. Wood would lead the team in saves with 2, also being the league leader in that category. Charlie Buffinton would lead the team in wins with 28, being the team’s only 20-game winner, games pitched and started (46), innings pitched (400.3), strikeouts (199), complete games (43), walks (59), hits allowed (324), wild pitches (15) and batters faced (1586). Rookie Kid Gleason would lead in home runs allowed (11) and hit batters (12). Dan Casey would lead the team in losses with 18 and earned runs allowed with 100.

The Phillies would end the season still among the league’s elite teams while still looking for their first team pennant. Meanwhile, the Giants would face the American Association winner, the St. Louis Browns, in a post-season series, which the Giants would win 6 games to four.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com, Baseball-reference.com

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