Results tagged ‘ Hall of Fame Voting ’

Ex-Phils Jim Kaat is among contenders on the Hall of Fame Veterans Committee Ballot.

Kaat’s career a study in consistency

Lefty workhorse a Veterans Committee finalist at Baseball Hall of Fame

By Jina Song and Craig Muder / National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

I hope Jim Kaat will finally get his due and get elected to the Hall. There’s not too pitchers who hasn’t won at least 280 games and has not been elected. About time he got in.

Jim Kaat pitched in four different decades, making him one of the most durable hurlers in big league history.

He was also one of the most effective pitchers of the last 50 years and now will be considered for the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.

Kaat, born on Nov. 7, 1938, played for the Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins (1959-73), Chicago White Sox (1973-75), Philadelphia Phillies (1976-79), New York Yankees (1979-80) and St. Louis Cardinals (1980-83). A 6-foot-4 lefty with great athletic ability, Kaat pitched 25 seasons in the Majors and posted a 283-237 record with a 3.45 ERA and 2,461 strikeouts.

Kaat’s best season was in 1966, when he won a league-leading 25 games with 19 complete games, three shutouts, a 2.75 ERA and just 55 walks in more than 300 innings. The Sporting News named him American League Pitcher of the Year. His other top seasons were 1972, when he went 10-2 with a 2.07 ERA in a season shortened due to a broken hand, and 1974-75 with the White Sox, when he won 21 and 20 games.

A three-time All-Star (1962, ’66, ’75), Kaat also won 16 consecutive Gold Glove Awards from 1962 to ’77. He pitched in the postseason four times, winning a World Series ring with the Cardinals in 1982.

Kaat was the last original Washington Senators player to retire. Not only did Kaat log 200-plus innings 14 times (including 300-plus twice), but he had 180 complete games, including nine seasons with 10 or more.

Kaat will be considered for the Class of 2009 at the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee as part of the post-1942 ballot (players who began their careers in 1943 and after). The other members of the post-1942 Veterans Committee final ballot are Dick Allen, Gil Hodges, Tony Oliva, Al Oliver, Vada Pinson, Ron Santo, Luis Tiant, Joe Torre and Maury Wills. Any player receiving at least 75 percent of the vote from the Veterans Committee, which consists of the 64 living Hall of Famers, will be enshrined at the Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2009.

Results from the Veterans Committee vote will be announced Dec. 8 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Las Vegas. (H/T National Baseball Hall of Fame.org)

As I said earlier, I hope he is elected in the Hall, and not just because he was part of the mid-70s Phillies’ team that won three straight NL Eastern Division pennants, but because he was a good pitcher he was a good pitcher who was also a good fielder. (Hey, he did win all of those Gold Glove Awards, remember?) Good, luck, Kaat, hope you get the call next month.

Former Phil Dick Allen on Hall of Fame Veterans Committee Ballot.

Allen’s bat stood out in a pitching-dominant era

Former slugger a Veterans Committee finalist for Hall of Fame

By Jina Song and Craig Muder / National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

I’m not sure Allen is going to get elected, based on who else is on the ballot. My opinion, of course.

In an era dominated by pitchers, Dick Allen proved to be one of baseball’s best hitters.

And though his final numbers were clearly affected by the time in which he played, Allen’s body of work has won him a spot on the Veterans Committee ballot this fall at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Allen, born on March 8, 1942, was known as one of the sport’s top right-handed power-hitters of the 1960s and early ’70s. Allen played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1963-69, 1975-76), St. Louis Cardinals (1970), Los Angeles Dodgers (1971), Chicago White Sox (1972-74) and Oakland Athletics (1977).

In 15 big league seasons, Allen clubbed 320 doubles, 79 triples and 351 home runs in 1,749 games. A third baseman and then a first baseman, Allen drove in 1,119 runs and scored 1,099.

In 1964, Allen was named the National League’s Rookie of the Year after hitting .318 with 29 home runs, 91 RBIs and 201 hits.

Allen earned 1972 Most Valuable Player honors after leading the American League in home runs (37), RBIs (113), slugging (.603) and walks (99). His .534 career slugging percentage was among the highest in an era marked by depressed offensive numbers.

A seven time All-Star, Allen was a three-time league leader in slugging percentage and extra-base hits and twice led his circuit in on-base percentage. He finished in the top five in slugging seven times and extra-base hits six times.

Allen was also a fierce baserunner and finished in the top 10 in steals twice.

Allen will be considered for the Class of 2009 at the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee as part of the post-1942 ballot (players who began their big league careers in 1943 or later). The other members of the post-1942 Veterans Committee final ballot are Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Tony Oliva, Al Oliver, Vada Pinson, Ron Santo, Luis Tiant, Joe Torre and Maury Wills. Any player receiving at least 75 percent of the vote from the Veterans Committee, which consists of the 64 living Hall of Famers, will be enshrined at the Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2009.

Results from the Veterans Committee vote will be announced Dec. 8 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Las Vegas. (H/T National Baseball Hall of Fame.org)

Although Allen has good numbers, since he’s going up against such former players as Ron Santo, Luis Tiant, Joe Torre, Maury Willis and Al Oliver, many of whom he played against, I honestly don’t see him getting the nod in December. I guess we’ll all know one way or the other in December.

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