Results tagged ‘ Rays ’

Spring Training: The Phillies have won their first Spring Training game as they defeat the Rays, 12-5.

After losing their third straight Spring Training game yesterday, this time to the Cincinnati Reds in Sarasota, Florida, by the score of 10-3, the Phillies’ bats would come alive today as they would pound the 2008 American League Champions Tampa Bay Rays for 12 runs on 13 hits at Bright House Field in Clearwater, Florida, defeating the Rays, 12-5.

Kyle Kendrick, whom pitching coach Rich Dubee had earlier announced as the person who had the fifth starter job to lose, would keep the Rays off the board in the top of the first. In the Phils’ half of the first, the silent bats would finally wake up in an explosive way against Rays’ starter Mitch Talbot. Jimmy Rollins would start the inning off with a double, before scoring on an RBI single by Shane Victorino, making it 1-0 Phils. One out later, Ryan Howard would get his first Spring Training hit, a two-run home run, plating Victorino before him, giving the Phillies a 3-0 lead. The next batter, John Mayberry, Jr., who is playing right field in place of Jayson Werth, who has a sore shoulder, would follow Howard with his own home run, his first for the spring, to make it 4-0 Phils. Two batters later, Miguel Cairo would knock in the last Phils run for the inning, as he would hit a solo home run, the third home run for the Phils in the inning, making it 5-0 Phillies.

In the top of the second inning, the Rays would get one of the runs back, as Ray Sadler would hit a two-out solo home run off of Kendrick, making it a 5-1 Phils lead. The Phillies would not score in their half of the second, nor would either team score a run in the third, although Kendrick would be replaced by Drew Naylor in the top of the inning when he got himself into a jam with two men out. Naylor would turn back the Rays, and then keep them quiet in the fourth. The Phillies would get another run back in their half of the fourth, as Jason Donald had an RBI single, his first hit of the spring, as he knocks in Cairo, who had earlier doubled, to make it 6-1 Phils. Naylor would then give up an RBI single to Justin Ruggiano in the fifth, as he would knock in Ray Olmedo, who has earlier singled and then stole second, as Naylor committeed an error trying to pick him off, making it 6-2 Phillies. 

After neither the Phils, in the bottom of the fifth, or the Rays, in the top of the sixth, as Mike Koplove would pitch an almost clean inning aginst the Rays, would be able to score, the Phillies would increase their lead to 7-2 in the bottom of the sixth as Ronny Paulino would hit a two-out solo shot. The Rays would get the run back in the top of the seventh, as Jon Weber would hit a two-out RBI double, knocking in Olmedo, making it a 7-3 Phils lead. The Phillies would get the run back in the bottom of the seventh, to make it 8-3 Phillies. After Clay Condrey would put the Rays down 1-2-3 in the top of the eighth, the Phillies would finally put the game away in the bottom of the inning as they would score four more runs, with Eric Bruntlett, Andy Tracy and Mayberry each knocking in a run with two men outs.

In the ninth, the Phils would send Jake Woods to the mound. He would give up a two-run home run to Elliot Johnson, with two men out, before finally ending the game, with the Phils winning 12-5.

Pitching-wise, Kendrick, one of the four pitchers trying out for the fifth starer position in the starting rotation, would pitch two and two-thirds innings, giving up one earned run on four hits. Naylor would follow by going two and a third innings, also giving up an earned run on three hits while striking out three batters. Koplove would go to the mound next, pitching a scoreless sixth, although walking a batter, who would later be erased in a double play. Scott Eyre would be the next Phils’ pitcher, giving up an earned run on two hits, while striking out one Ray. Condrey would follow and pitch a 1-2-3 eighth. Woods would pitch the ninth, giving up two earned runs on two hits as he struck out two.

Among the batters, Howard, Cairo and Mayberry would lead the Phils thirteen-hit attack by each getting two hits, with each man hitting a home run, a two-run shot by Howard and solo shots by Cairo and Mayberry, while Mayberry would knock in a second run during the Phillies’ four-run eighth. Rollins, Victorino, Bruntlett, Tracy, Pablo Ozuna, Donald and Paulino would each get one hit.

The victory gives the Phillies a 1-3 record in the Grapefruit League. The next Phillies’ game is tomorrow afternoon at 1:05 pm Eastern, as the Phils play the Atlanta Braves in Lake Buena Vista, Florida at Disney’s Wide World of Sports.

Philadelphia Phillies – Records: Throwing a No-Hitter.

As mentioned in a previous article, there are several feats in baseball which is rare for baseball players to accomplish. Hitting for the cycle is one. Another is throwing a no-hitter. Throwing a perfect game is rarer still. In Major League Baseball History, as of 2008, there has been thrown only 256 no-hitters, of which only 1 has been perfect games. Four teams have so far not been able to throw a no-hitter, those teams being the New York Mets, the San Diego Padres, the Colorado Rockies and the Tampa Bay Rays. In Phillies’ team history, Phil pitchers have thrown only nine no-hitters, including one perfect game, while being the victim eighteen times, as well as being the victim in five other games that are now no longer considered no-hitters because of a rule change made in 1991 in which a no-hitter is now considered, “An official no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings.” The five that are no longer considered no-hitters were games that were stopped before being able to reach the now official nine innings, mainly because of either rain (or pre-1930s, because of the game being called because of darkness.) At this moment, I will concentrate on the nine no-hitters thrown by Phillies’ pitchers.

The first Phillies’ no-hitter would be thrown on Saturday, August 29, 1885, by Charlie Ferguson, as he would defeat Dupee Shaw of the Providence Grays, 1-0, at Recreation Park. The second Phillies’ no-hitter would occur on Friday, July 8, 1898, as Red Donahue would defeat the Boston Beaneaters, 5-0, at National League Park, aka Baker Bowl. The next Phillies’ no-hitter would be the first one thrown by a Phils’ pitcher in the 20th century as Chick Fraser would no-hit the Chicago Cubs in Chicago, 10-0, on Friday, September 18, 1903, at the second ballpark that the Cubs would name West Side Park, in the second game of a doubleheader split between the two old rivals. No-hitter number four would occur on Tuesday, May 1, 1906, in Brooklyn, as Johnny Lush would defeat the Brooklyn Superbas (now the Los Angeles Dodgers) at the second part that Brooklyn would call Washington Park, 6-0. The fifth Phillies no-hitter would not occur until Sunday, June 24, 1964 when Hall of Famer Jim Bunning would throw his father’s day perfect game against the New York Mets at Shea Stadium, winning 6-0. This would be the junior senator from Kentucky second no-hitter, as he threw an earlier one in 1958 as a member of the Detroit Tigers. The next no-hitter recorded by a Phillies’ pitcher would occur over seven years later, on Wednesday, June 23, 1971, as Rick Wise would help his own cause by hitting two home runs in a 4-0 defeat of Ross Grimsley of the Cincinnati Reds, in Cincinnati, at Riverfront Stadium. Phillies no-hitter number seven would be the first no-hitter to be thrown at Veterans Stadium, as Terry Mulholland would defeat Don Robinson of the San Francisco Giants 6-0, on Wednesday, August 15, 1990. No-hitter number eight, the last Phillies’ no-hitter of the 20th Century, would be the only no-hitter so far pitch outside of the U.S. by a Phillies’ pitcher as Tommy Greene would throw a no-no against the Montral Expos at Olympic Stadium, on Thursday, May 23, 1991, defeating Oil Can Boyd, 2-0. The Phillies’ ninth and most recent no-hitter, would also be the first no-no to be thrown by a Phils’ pitcher in the 21st Century, as well as the second and last one to be thrown at Veterans Stadium, as Kevin Millwood would defeat the Giants and Jesse Foppert, 1-0, on Sunday, April 27, 2003.

Phillies’ pitchers have thrown two no-hitters in the 19th Century, six in the 20th and one so far in the 21st Century. Of the nine no-hitters, four have been thrown in Philadelphia, one each has so far occurred in Chicago, Brooklyn, Cincinnati, and Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Two no-hitters were thrown at Veterans Stadium, with one each being thrown at Recreation Park, National League Park (Baker Bowl), West Side Park (II), Washington Park (II), Shea Stadium, Riverfront Stadium and Olympic Stadium. The main victim has so far been the San Francisco Giants, who have been no-noed twice, with the now defunct Providence Grays, Braves (as the Boston Beaneaters), Cubs, Dodgers (as the Brooklyn Superbas), Mets, Reds and the Nationals (as the Montreal Expos) being the victim one time each. Only one of the pitchers to throw a Phillies’ no-hitter, Jim Bunning, is now a member of the Hall of Fame.

Who will be the next Phillies’ pitcher to no-hit an opponent? No idea at this point in time, although the most likely person to do it would be Cole Hamels, the team’s present ace.

Sources: Wikipedia, Phillies.com, Baseball Almanac.com, Retrosheet.org

Philadelphia Phillies – Records: Hitting for the Cycle.

There are several things that are rear to do in Baseball. One is to pitch a no-hitter, whether its ends up being a perfect game or not. The other is hitting for the cycle. Of the two feats, hitting for the cycle is a very rare thing to do while being a member of the Philadelphia Phillies, as it has been accomplished only eight times by a Phil, with one player actually doing it twice.

For those of you who might not know what hitting for the cycle is, hitting for the cycle means that in one game, you have hit a single, a double, a triple and a home run, in at least four official at-bats. To date, hitting for the cycle has occurred only 248 times in Major League History. Players playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates have done it the most times with 23, while no players have so far done it for either the San Diego Padres, the Florida Marlins or the Tampa Bay Rays. The last major leaguer to have hit for the cycle has been Adrián Beltré of the Seattle Mariners, who had accomplished the feat on September 1, 2008, just hours after Stephen Drew of the Arizona Diamondbacks had done it.

Among the Phillies, the first one to hit for the cycle would be Lave Cross, who would perform the feat on April 24, 1894, in a 4-1 win over the Brooklyn Bridegrooms (now the Los Angeles Dodgers). Several months later, on August 17, Sam Thompson would become the second Phillie player to accomplish the feat, doing it during a 29-4 rout of the Louisville Colonels (Yes, Louisville, Kentucky, actually had a major league franchise before the start of the 20th Century.). It would be 33 years before the third Phillie to hit for the cycle, Cy Williams, who would win the National League home run title that same year, would do the deed, performing it on August 5, 1927, in a 9-7 victory over the Pirates. The fourth Phillie to hit for the cycle, Chuck Klein, would perform it on July 1, 1931, in a 11-6 win over the Chicago Cubs. Less than two years later, Klein would become the only Phillie player to perform the deed twice, as he would hit for the cycle again on May 26, 1933, during the year he would win the NL triple crown (batting average, home runs, RBIs), doing it in a 5-4 lost to the St. Louis Cardinals. The sixth Phil to join the club would be Johnny Callison, who would accomplish the deed on June 27, 1963, over 30 years after Klein’s second performance, doing it in a 13-4 rout of the Pirates. It would be another 32 years before the next Phil, Greg Jefferies, would hit for the cycle, doing it on August 24, 1995, during a 7-6 win over the Dodgers. The most recent Phillie player to do it, David Bell, would did it on June 28, 2004, in a 14-6 victory over the Montreal Expos (now the Washington Senators).

In the eight times that a Phil has hit for the cycle, the Phillies have won all but one of those games. The team that the cycle has been done against the most has been the Dodgers and the Pirates, who have both been on the wrong end twice, while the Louisville Colonels, the Cubs, the Cardinals (the only team to win when a Phil hit for the cycle) and the Nationals (as the Expos), have been the other four. Two Hall of Famers, Sam Thompson and Chuck Klein (who did it twice) have both hit for the cycle while being a Phil.

When will another Phil hit for the cycle? Your guess is as good as mines.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com

We now know where Pat Burrell has landed…

Free agent Pat Burrell, the former left fielder for the 2008 World Champions Philadelphia Phillies, has just finished signing a two-year, $16 million contract with the 2008 American League Champions Tampa Bay Rays. Burrell, who, until signing with the Rays, has spent all nine years of his major league career with the Phillies, having a career batting average of .257, while hitting 251 home runs (3rd place in team history) and 827 RBIs (7th place) for the red pinstripes. Burrell will more than likely be acting as the Rays’ designated hitter, although he has said at one time that he would prefer playing in the field, thus keeping his mind in the game.

We’re going to miss you here in Philly, Pat, and I, for one, wish you success in Tampa, as long as it isn’t against the Phils.

Chase Utley’s quick thinking throw to home plate in Game 5 of the 2008 World Series is voted the 2008 Postseason Moment of the Year by the fans in the This Year in Baseball Awards.

Chase Utley’s faking a throw to first and then throwing home to nail the Rays’ Jason Bartlett for the final out in the top of the seventh inning to keep Game 5 of the World Series tied has been voted the 2008 Postseason Moment of the Year by the fans in MLB.com’s annual This Year in Baseball Awards, receiving 35.6 percent of the votes, beating out fellow Phil Brad Lidge’s striking out Erik Hinske in the top of the ninth to clinch the Phillies winning of the 2008 World Series, 4 games to 1.

Congratulations on winning the fan award, Chase.

Brad ‘Lights Out’ Lidge has been voted Closer of the Year by the fans in MLB.com’s This Year in Baseball Awards.

Lights Out Lidge has been voted the Closer of the Year by the fans at MLB.com’s This Year in Baseball Awards, after going 41 for 41 in save opportunities, and adding seven more saves in the post season, thus going 48 for 48 for the year, before striking out the Rays’ Eric Hinske in the ninth inning for the final out in the fifth and final game of the 2008 World Series won by the Phillies 4 games to 1. Lidge would win the award in a land slide, receiving 44 percent of the votes cast to Mariano Duncan of the Yankees 22.7 percent.

Anyway, congratulations to Brad Lidge, and the Phillies in general, on winning another award, this time by the fans.

Charlie Manuel voted Manager of the Year, Pat Gillick voted Executive of the Year by fans in This Year in Baseball Award Voting.

While finishing second in the National League Manager of the Year voting by the Baseball writers, Charlie Manuel has been voted Manager of the Year by the fans in MLB.com’s This Year in Baseball Award Voting presented by State Farm, as he beat out Joe Maddon of the American League Champion Tampa Bay Rays, getting 36.3 percent of the overall total of 12 million votes cast in all categories. Maddon would receive 20.5 percent of the vote.

Pat Gillick, the recently retired General Manager of the Phillies, who help to develop the team that would win the Phils second World Championship in the team’s 126 years history, has been voted the Executive of the Year by the fans, receiving 31.8 percent of the vote, beating out Boston Red Sox General Manager Theo Epstein.

Congratulations, guys. The fans obviously knew who were the best men this year in both categories.

Phillies add Scott Proefrock as new assistant GM.

Phillies name Proefrock assistant GM

Amaro’s former position filled by Orioles front-office employee

Proefrock spent the past three years as director of baseball administration in Baltimore. He had spent the previous 11 years with Tampa Bay, eventually serving as assistant GM to Chuck LaMar through the 2005 season. He also worked with LaMar with the Braves from 1991-95 and Pittsburgh in 1989-90.

He’ll be working with LaMar again in Philadelphia, as both share an assistant GM title. Proefrock will handle big league contracts and the composition of the roster, a role held by Amaro while assisting former GMs Ed Wade and Pat Gillick.

Amaro named Benny Looper and LaMar assistant general managers last week, with both focusing on scouting and player development.

Proefrock was chosen over former Mets GM Jim Duquette, former Reds GM Wayne Krivsky and Muzzy Jackson, formerly an assistant GM with the Royals. (H/T Phillies.com)

Once again, welcome to the Phils, Scott, and how that you’ll have as big an impact here as you had, if a bit late, with the American League Champion Rays.

Phillies World Series Artifacts are head for the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.

World Series artifacts heading to Hall

Hamels’ jersey, Upton’s spikes to be featured in Cooperstown

By Mark Newman / MLB.com

And the series will now be commemorated for all time at the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

PHILADELPHIA — The 104th World Series will be memorable for many reasons — from the mere presence of the Amazin’ Rays to the unprecedented 46-hour suspension of play to the long-awaited celebration of a major sports championship in Philadelphia and the gathering of long-suffering fans on Broad Street.

Fittingly, it is being commemorated for generations of fans to come at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y. Many artifacts that were used in this Fall Classic were donated by humbled players after the Phillies’ 4-3 clinching victory over Tampa Bay on Wednesday night at Citizens Bank Park. Those items will go on display at the Hall of Fame in mid-November. They include:

• Cole Hamels’ No. 35 home pinstriped jersey that he wore in Game 5: Hamels was 4-0 in the postseason and was named World Series MVP.

“That’s something I never expected,” he said, wearing the jersey underneath two layers of shirts during the clubhouse celebration. “It’s a tremendous experience and an honor for them to want to take something from me. This whole fifth game will be a trivia question for the next 100 years, and I get to be a part of it.”

• Jayson Werth’s spikes: His single in the bottom of the sixth, right after play resumed, drove in pinch-hitter Geoff Jenkins to give Philadelphia a temporary 3-2 lead. He also stole three bags in the series, including one in Game 5.

“Gosh, what an honor,” Werth said on the Citizens Bank Park field, as players celebrated there with family, friends and fellow Phillies personnel. “I mean, really, step back and think about that. I come from a long line of baseball players, and I’m thankful to them. My grandfather was a ballplayer. My stepdad [Dennis Werth] played in the big leagues. We’re just baseball players, not Hall of Famers. For me to have something go there to Cooperstown, that’s unbelievable.”

• Joe Blanton’s bat that he used to hit the fabled home run in Game 4: It marked the first time since Ken Holtzman of Oakland in 1974 that a pitcher homered in the World Series.

“As a pitcher, it’s not what you expect,” Blanton said. “Very possibly the last thing you expect. But just to have a piece of your playing equipment go to the Hall of Fame is so special. Not every player can say he has something there.”

Blanton said he has not been to Cooperstown, and this will nudge him in that direction.

“Now, I have another good reason,” he said. “One of those things I’ve never been able to do for whatever reason. But I grew up in a baseball family and definitely will go now.”

• Ryan Howard’s bat used in Game 5: The 2008 National League MVP candidate busted out just in time during this postseason, hitting two homers in Game 4 to give him three long balls in the World Series.

“That would be cool,” he said with a big grin, shortly after Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson received his permission to take the lumber back to Cooperstown.

• Eric Bruntlett’s cap: He broke up a Game 2 shutout with a solo homer off rookie David Price in the eighth inning at Tropicana Field during the Rays’ 4-2 victory. But his most memorable moment in this Fall Classic came when he scored the winning run on Carlos Ruiz’s 30-foot walk-off chopper in Game 3, giving Philly the World Series lead for keeps. Bruntlett also scored the go-ahead run on Pedro Feliz’s RBI single in the clincher on Wednesday.

“We had a lot of good fortune that inning,” Bruntlett said that night. “It’s one of those deals where it feels like it’s in slow motion. I feel like I should be moving faster, but can’t. You want to get there so quickly. It feels like a long 90 feet.”

• Ruiz’s helmet: It’s what he was wearing when he mashed that ball into the ground to put the perfect ending to Game 3 for Phillies faithful. This was the World Series when a lot of baseball fans got to know more about the catcher from Panama.

“We were so hungry for this, we wanted this title,” Ruiz said. “I want to thank Panama for supporting me and the Phillies all year long. I want all of Panama to enjoy this with me. This was a great season and a great organization. This is for all of us.”

• The cap Brad Lidge wore in Game 5 when he saved the Series-clinching win for the Phillies.

• B.J. Upton’s spikes and Joe Maddon’s flap-cap: Upton had four steals in the World Series, including the one on the mud going into second base just before the Game 5 suspension on Monday, and the Rays wound up with a postseason-record 25 steals. Maddon managed the Rays from a 2007 last-place finish into a World Series team, and that flap-cap became a much-discussed piece of headwear in this cold, final week of the 2008 baseball season. Consider this a Cooperstown tip of the cap.

“I thought we presented ourselves really well,” Maddon said. “And I think all this country now knows who we are, as well as the world, the baseball world.” (H/T baseballhalloffame.org)

Interesting choices of some of the equipment that they plan to put on display. I wonder how many of the players will later be joining as members? Makes you wonder, doesn’t it?

Correction: The writer of the article, Mr. Newman, has just informed me in the comments section that the bat that Howard gave to the Hall should be listed as from Game 4, not 5. 

2008 World Series: Game 5.5: The Phillies are the 2008 World Champions of the Baseball World.

The Phillies have won the 2008 World Series, winning the series four games to one, as they would outscore the Rays in the final three and a half innings of this past Monday’s suspended game five, 4-3. As play resumed, Rays’ manager Joe Maddon would decide to leave Grant Balfour in the game. Pinch hitter Geoff Jenkins would be the first batter to face him in the Phillies’ half of the sixth, and he would greet him with a hard hit double to center. Jimmy Rollins would follow with an excellent sacrifice bunt, that would go 5-3 for the inning’s first out, as he would move Jenkins over to third base. Then, with the Rays’ infield pulled in to prevent a run, Jayson Werth would hit a pop up into shallow center field. Ray’s second baseman Akinori Iwamura would be unable to make an over-the-shoulder basket catch of the ball, as it would drop in for a RBI single, scoring Jenkins, and giving the Phillies a 3-2 lead. Balfour is then taken out of the ballgame by Maddon and is replaced on the mound by J.P. Howell. Howell would then end the inning by first getting Utley to strike out swinging for the inning’s second out, and after Werth would steal second, he would get Ryan Howard to pop out to third for the final out of the inning. Charlie Manuel would then put out in place of Cole Hamels, who is now in line to be the game’s winning pitching, Ryan Madson. Madson would proceed to strike out Dioner Navarro looking for the inning’s first out. But then he would give up a solo home run to Rocco Baldelli to left, tying the game up at three apiece, and thus denying Hamels his chance to make World Series history by winning all five of his starts. Jason Bartlett would then follow with a single. The next batter, Howell, would sacrifice the runner over to second, 1-4, for the inning’s second out, as he put a runner in scoring position. Madson is then replaced by J.C. Romero. Iwamura would then hit a ground ball towards second base, that Utley would be able to grab, but would then have no play to make at first, as Iwamura would get an infield single. But, Utley would then throw a strike towards home plate as he would see Bartlett trying to score from second on the play. His throw would beat Bartlett to home plate and then Carlos Ruiz would tag out a sliding Bartlett to keep the game tied at three all. In the Phillies’ half of the seventh, Pat Burrell would start the inning off with a double to left center field. As he would be replaced on second base by pinch runner Eric Bruntlett, the Rays would replace Howell on the mound with Chad Bradford. Shane Victorino would then hit the ball to the right side of the infield, after being unable to put down a bunt, for the inning’s first out, 4-3, while Bruntlett would move on over to third base. This move would once again force the Rays to bring in their infield. Pedro Feliz would take advantage of this move as he would hit a RBI single to center, scoring Bruntlett and giving the Phillies’ a 4-3 lead. Ruiz would then follow Feliz by hitting into a force out, 4-6, wiping out Feliz at second for the second out. Romero would then bat for himself and proceed to hit into a force out, 4-6, for the inning’s final out. Romero would then stay in to pitch the eighth. Chris Crawford would start the inning off with a single. B.J. Upton would then hit into a 6-4-3 double play, doubling up Crawford at second base, putting no one on base with two men out. Romero would then end the inning by getting Carlos Pena to fly out to left for the final out. In the Phillies’ eighth, the Rays would send out David Price to keep the game close. Prince would proceed to get Rollins to fly out to left for the inning’s first out and then would strike out Werth for out number two. Utley would then get on base with a walk. After Utley would steal second, Howard would end the inning by striking out. In the Rays’ ninth, the Phillies would hand the ball over to Brad Lidge to end the game. Lidge would get Evan Longorio to pop out to Utley for the first out of the inning. Navarro would then get on base with a single. Navarro would be replaced at first by pinch runner Fernando Perez, while pinch hitter Ben Zobrist would come to the plate. After Perez would steal second base, Lidge would get Zobrist out as he lines out directly to the right fielder for the second out of the inning. Maddon would then send out pinch hitter Eric Hinske to try and take the lead with one swing of the bat. Instead, Lidge would strike Hinske out for the game’s final out, as he would record his forty-eighth straight save in forty-eight attempts and his seventh save of the post-season, and lead to the start of a celebration among the Phillies, as they would win their second World Championship in the team’s 126 years of existance.

Cole Hamels would get a no-decision, as he would pitch six strong innings, giving up two earned runs on five hits and a walk, while striking out three. Ryan Madson would pitch two-thrids of an inning, giving up an earned run on two hits, while striking out one. J.C. Romero would get the win as he pitches a scoreless inning and a third, giving up only two hits. His series’ record is now 2-0 with an 0.00 ERA. Brad Lidge would record his second save of the series, pitching a scoreless inning, as he would give up just a hit, while striking out one, as he records his forty-eighth straight save, and his seventh in the post-season. Scott Kazmir would also get a no-decision, as he would go only four innings plus two batters, giving up two earned runs on four hits, six walks and a hit batsman, while striking out five. Grant Balfour would pitch an inning and a third, giving up an earned run on two hits. J.P. Howell would get the lost as he would pitch two-thirds of an inning plus one batter, giving up an earned run on one hit, while striking out one. His series’ record is now 0-2 with an ERA of 7.71. Chad Bradford would pitch a scoreless inning, giving up only one hit. David Price would also pitch a scoreless inning, giving up just a walk, while striking out two.

During the celebration, which would include Bud Selig giving David Montgomery, Pat Gillick and Charlie Manuel the World Series Trophy, Cole Hamels would be announced as being the 2008 World Series MVP. It would later be announced that the city of Philadelphia plans to hold its World Series parade on Friday. And it would appear that the parade wouldl be shown on at least one of the local networks. I can’t wait. :)

Now that the Phillies have won the series, I would like to first apologize for the number of times that I’ve shown a lack faith in the guys actually being able to get into the World Series. Next, I would like to laugh in the face of the so-called experts who during the post-season have never given the Phillies the chance to win the Series, including FOX. Ha-HA, in your face, experts. Lastly, I would like to congratulate the Tampa Bay Rays for doing as well as they did this season to get into the World Series as well. I am sure that they’ll be back in the series at some point during the next few years.

Next stop, the victory parade. I love a parade, etc. etc. :)

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