Results tagged ‘ Shutouts ’

The Phils lose the weekend series to the Dodgers, losing the opener 2-0, then winning the middle game 5-3, before being humiliated by being no-hit in the final game, the first time in Philly in 45 years, losing 6-0.

Philadelphia_PhilliesThe Phils lose the three-game series with the Dodgers, getting humiliated in the final game by being no-hit at home for the first time in 45 years.

On Friday night, the Dodgers took the lead in the top of the first inning as, with a man on third, and with one man out, Yasiel Puig hits an RBI single, knocking in Dee Gordon, who had started the game off with a second, then stole first second base, then third base, giving the Dodgers a 1-0 lead. The Dodgers then made it a 2-0 lead in the top of the second as Carl Crawford hits a lead-off home run, his fourth home run of the season, giving the Dodgers a 2-0 lead. That would end up being the final score as the Phils would be three-hit in the game by Dodgers’ pitching, getting only a fourth inning double by Chase Utley, a sixth inning lead-off double by Jimmy Rollins and a lead-off single in the seventh inning by Ben Revere, as the offense is unable to cash in on several scoring opportunities in the later innings, before Kenley Jansen collect his fourteenth save of the year by pitching a 1-2-3 ninth, getting Tony Gwynn, Jr. to lined out to left for the game’s final out.

Roberto Hernandez (2-2, 3.83) took the lost as he pitched six and a third innings, giving up two runs on seven hits and four walks, while striking out three. Mario Hollands pitched two-thirds of an inning, getting out both men whom he would face. Antonio Bastardo pitched two scoreless innings, giving up two hits and a walk, while striking out three, Clayton Kershaw (3-1, 3.49) got the win as he pitched six shutout innings, giving up two hits and three walks, while striking out nine. Brandon League pitched to three batters, getting none of them out, as he gave up a hit and a walk. J.P. Howell collected his tenth hold of the season as he pitched an inning, giving up no hits. Brian Wilson collected his seventh hold of the season as he pitched a 1-2-3 inning, striking out two. Kenley Jansen received his fourteenth save of the season by pitching a 1-2-3 inning, striking out a batter.

The Phils had only three hits in the game, a double by Jimmy Rollins, a double by Chase Utley and a single by Ben Revere. They also had four walks (Carlos Ruiz (2), Darin Ruf, Cesar Hernandez) and a sacrifice bunt (Tony Gwynn, Jr.) in the game, while the defense performed two double plays.

On Saturday night, the Phils took a quick 2-o lead in the bottom of the first as, with one man on, and with one man out, Chase Utley, after catcher A.J. Ellis had made a foul pop error on a ball in foul territory, hits a two-run home run, his fourth home run of the season, knocking in Ben Revere, who had started the inning off with a double. The Phils increased their lead in the bottom of the second as, with a runner on second, and with two men out, Revere hits an RBI single, knocking in Cesar Hernandez, who had earlier walked, then moved up to second base on David Buchanan’s sacrifice bunt, 5-4, beating the throw to the plate, giving the Phils a 3-0 lead, before moving up to second base on the throw to the plate. The Phils then made it a 4-0 lead as Jimmy Rollins followed with an RBI single, scoring Revere. The Dodgers get a run back in the top of the fourth as, with runners on second and third, and with one man out, Carl Crawford hits an RBI ground out, 3-unassisted, scoring Justin Turner, who had started the inning off with a double, then stopped at third base on Yasiel Puig’s infield single, making it a 4-1 Phils’ lead, while sending Puig, who had earlier reached base on an infield single, then moved up to second base on Adrian Gonzalez’s soft ground out, 1-3, over to third base. The Dodgers then cut the Phils’ lead down to 4-2 in the top of the fifth as, with a runner on second, and with two men out, Dee Gordon hits an RBI single, scoring Erisbel Arruebarrena, who had earlier walked, then moved up to second base on Dan Haren’s ground out, 6-3. The Phils would get the run back in their half of the fifth as, with a man on third, and with nobody out, Rollins hits an RBI ground out, 6-3, knocking in Revere, who had earlier reached base on an infield single, then went all the way to third on pitcher Haren’s two-base throwing error, giving the Phils a 5-2 lead. The Dodgers made it a 5-3 Phils’ lead in the top of the sixth as, with a runner on third, and with two men out, Puig, who had started the inning off with a triple, would score on Carlos Ruiz’s passed ball. That would end up being the final score as Jonathan Papelbon received his thirteenth save of the year as he pitched a scoreless ninth, striking out pinch-hitter Scott Van Slyke, swinging, for the game’s final out.

David Buchanan (1-0,  3.60) got the win, the first in his major league career, as he pitched five innings, giving up two runs on five hits, while striking out two. Jake Diekman received his sixth hold of the season as he pitched two innings, giving up an unearned run on a hit, a walk and a passed ball, while striking out one. Mike Adams collected his sixth hold of the season as he pitched a 1-2-3 inning, striking out a batter. Jonathan Papelbon collected his thirteenth save of the season, as he pitched a scoreless inning, giving up a hit and a walk, while striking out one. Dan Haren (5-3, 3.16) took the lost as he pitched six innings, giving up five runs, only two of which were earned, on six hits and two walks, while striking out seven. Paul Maholm pitched two scoreless innings, giving up a hit, a hit batter and a balk, while sriking out two.

The Phils had seven hits in the game, with Ben Revere (RBI) leading the team with four hits, three singles and a double. Jimmy Rollins (Single, 2 RBIs), Chase Utley (Home Run, 2 RBIs) and Marlon Byrd (Double), had the other three Phils’ hits. The Phils also had two walks (Carlos Ruiz, Cesar Hernandez),  a hit batter (Byrd) and a sacrifice bunt (David Buchanan) in the game, while the defense had picked off a runner (Ruiz), committed an error (Buchanan (1)) and performed a double play.

On Sunday, the Dodgers took the lead in the top of the first as, with a runner on third, and with two men out, Adrian Gonzalez hits an RBI double, knocking in Dee Gordon, who had started the game off with a single, stole second base, then stopped at third base on Carl Crawford’s fly out to center, giving the Dodgers a 1-0 lead. The Dodgers increased their lead in the top of the first as Justin Turner hits a lead-off home run, his second home run of the season, giving the Dodgers a 2-0 lead. The Dodgers then made it a 3-0 lead in the top of the sixth as, with a runner on second, and with two men out, Erisbel Arruebarrena hits an RBI single, knocking in Turner, before going to second base on the late throw to the plate. The Dodgers added to their lead in the top of the seventh as, with a man on second, and with nobody out, Gordon, who had started the inning off with a walk, then stole second base, would score on first baseman Ryan Howard’s fielding error of Crawford’s grounder, making it a 4-0 Dodgers’ lead, while Crawford would stop at second base. The Dodgers then made it a 5-0 lead two as, after Yasiel Puig hits a double, which sends Crawford on to third base, and with still nobody out, Adrian Gonzalez hits an RBI single, knocking in Crawford, while sending Puig up to third, putting runners on the corners. The Dodgers then added to their lead as Andre Ethier hits into a double play, 6-4-3, wiping out Gonzalez at second base for the inning’s first out, as Puig scores, making it a 6-0 Dodgers’ lead. That would end up being the final score as Josh Beckett pitches a no-hitter, the first pitched against the Phils since 1978 and the first pitched against them at home since 1969, as he struck out Chase Utley, looking, for the game’s final out.

A.J. Burnett (3-4, 3.51) took the lost as he pitched seven innings, giving up six runs, four of which were earned, on eleven hits and a walk, while striking out three. Jeff Manship pitched two 1-2-3 innings, striking out a batter. Josh Beckett (3-1, 2.43) got the win as he pitched a complete game no-hitter, giving up three walks, while striking out six.

The Phils had no hits in the game. They had three walks (Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley, Marlon Byrd) in the game, while the defense committed an error (Ryan Howard (3)) and performed a double play.

The Phils (21-26, 54th NL East) start a three-game home series with the Rockies (27-23, 2nd NL West) with a game in progress.

The Phils finally end their losing streak with the Braves, as Hamels five-hits Atlanta, leading to a 3-0 win.

Cole Hamels five-hit the Braves as the Phils finally end their losing streak with Atlanta, winning 3-0.

The Phils took a quick 1-0 lead in the first as Dom Brown hits an RBI double, knocking in Jimmy Rollins, who had started the inning off with a double. Two batters later, with Brown still on second base, and now with one man out, Ryan Howard hits a two-run home run, his fifth home run of the season, knocking in Brown, giving the Phils a 3-0 lead. That would turn out to be more than enough for Cole Hamels, as he threw a complete game shutout, the fifth of his career, allowing only five hits, all singles, to the Braves: a lead-off single to Chipper Jones in the second, who is, two batters latter, wiped out at second base for the inning’s second out, on a 4-6-3 doubleplay ball hit by Brian McCann; a two-out single in the fifth by McCann, who is thrown out at second base, 8-4, trying to stretch it into a double, by a strong throw by left fielder Brown as second baseman Chase Utley applies the tag; a lead-off bunt single in the seventh by Michael Bourn, who is then left stranded at first base; a lead-off single in the eighth by Freddie Freeman , who is, two batters later, wiped out at second base for the inning’s second out, on a 6-4-3 doubleplay ball hit by Reed Johnson and a one-out single in the ninth by pinch hitter Tyler Pastornicky, before Hamels ended the game two batters later by getting Martin Prado to ground out, 6-3, for the final out.

Cole Hamels (12-6, 3.14) got the win, his first since signing his new contract, as he threw a complete game shutout, giving up just five hits, which striking out six. Mike Minor (6-8, 4.95) took the lost as he pitched seven innings, giving up three runs on seven hits and two walks, while striking out five. Luis Avilan and Cory Gearnin combined for a 1-2-3 inning, striking out a batter (Avilan).

The Phils had seven hits in the ballgame, with Erik Kratz (Single, Double) and Nate Schierholtz (Singles) both leading the club with two hits apiece. Jimmy Rollins (Double), Dom Brown (Double, RBI) and Ryan Howard (Home Run, 2 RBIs) had the other three Phils’ hits. The Phils also had two walks in the game.

The Phils (50-60, T-4th) will conclude their series with the Braves (63-47, 2nd) with a night game tonight. The game will be played at Citizens Bank Park, and is to start at 7:05 pm EDT.  The Phils will send to the mound Kyle Kendrick (4-9, 4.45), who is coming off a lost to the D-backs on August 3, after replacing Joe Blanton, who had been traded to the Dodgers, as he went four innings, giving up three runs, two of which were earned, on five hits, as he struck out two, in the Phils’ 4-2 lost. He will be trying to pitched the Phils to their third straight series win. The Braves plan to counter with their ace Tim Hudson (11-4, 3.45), who is coming off a win against the Astros on August 3, as he went seven and a third innings, giving up an unearned run on four hits and two walks, while striking out three, in the Braves’ 4-1 win. He will be going for his twelfth win of the season. The Phils will be going for the series win tonight.

The Phils have come to an aggreement with both Cole Hamels and Wilson Valdez, avoiding arbitration with both.

Earlier today, the Phils have announced that Cole Hamels had earlier today signed a one-year contract worth $15 million dollars, thus avoiding arbitration. Hamels, who is the number three-man in the Phils’ starting rotation, in 2011 had a 14-9 record with a 2.79 ERA, as he pitched in 32 games, all but one of which was as a starter. He pitched in 216 innings, striking out 194 batters, while walking only 44. Hamels threw 10 complete, while pitching four shut outs. Carrer-wise, his record is 74-54 with an ERA of 3.39. Although he would become eligible to enter the free agent market after this season, it is hoped that at some point during the season that the Phils will sign Hamels to a multi-year extension. Let keep our fingers crossed on that people.

The Phils have also avoided arbitration with Wilson Valdez, who had signed a new contract for one season, worth $930,000. Valdez, who had played second base, third base and shortstop, last year appeared in 99 games, batting .249 (68 for 273), with 14 doubles, 4 triples and 1 home runs, while knocking in 30 runs.

That leaves just Hunter Pence to sign to a contract before both sides would have to face an arbitrator. I think that it can be done.

Three Phils starters end up in the top five in the 2011 NL Cy Young Award Balloting.

Roy Halladay, Cliff Lee and Cole Hamels ended up in 2nd, 3rd and 5th place, respectively, in the voting for the 2011 National League Cy Young Award, which was won by Clayton Kershaw of the Dodgers, as most people had expected.

Roy Halladay, the ace of the Phils pitching staff, and the winner of the award the previous season (2010), who in 2011 had a record of 19-6 in 32 games started, with an ERA of 2.35, and pitched in 232.2 innings, striking out 220 batters while walking only 35, ended second in the balloting with 4 first place votes, 21 second place votes and 7 third places votes, for a total of 133 points, being unable to win his second straight Cy Young Award and his third overall (2003 AL (Toronto), 2011 NL (Phils)). Cliff Lee, who during the season was twice voted the NL pitcher of the month (June, August), had a record of 17-8 with a 2.40 ERA in 32 starts, pitched in 232.2 innings, striking out 228 batters while only giving out 42 free passes, while throwing six complete game shutouts, ended up third in the balloting, with five second place votes, 17 third, 9 fourth and 1 fifth place votes for a total of 90 points. The third Phil among the top five, Cole Hamels, ended the 2011 season with a 14-9 record with a 2.79 ERA in 32 games pitched, all but one as a starter, pitching in 216 innings as he struck out 194 batters while walking only 44, ended up in fifth place among those on the ballot, with two fourth place votes and 13 fifth place votes, for a total of 17 points.

The winner, Clayton Kershaw, won the award with 27 first place votes, 3 second and 2 third places votes, as he won the NL pitching Triple Crown, as he ended up tied for most wins (21) with Ian Kennedy of the Diamondbacks, having the best ERA (2.28) and the most strikeouts (248).

Congratulations to Kershaw, and congrats on your placements on the ballot, guys.

33 games in 31 days: Game #3: The Phils once more shut downs the Reds as they defeat the Reds, 3-0.

The Phils win another series, as Cliff Lee and Ryan Madson combine for a six-hit shutout, as the Phils defeat the Reds, 3-0.

The Phils took the lead in the first as, with runners on the corners, and with one man out, Ryan Howard hits into an RBI force out, 3-4, wiping out at second base for the inning’s second out Chase Utley, who had earlier been safe at first on an earlier force out, 4-6, forcing out at second base Placido Polanco, who had earlier walked, for the inning’s first out, while scoring Shane Victorino, who had started off the game with a walk, went to second base on Polanco’s walk, then stopped at third on Utley’s force out, as Howard beats the throw back to first, giving the Phils a 1-0 lead. The Phils then added to their lead in the sixth as Hunter Pence hits a lead-off home run, his eighteenth home run of the year, and his seventh as a Phil, giving the Phils a 2-0 lead. The Phils then made it a 3-0 lead in the seventh as, with runners on the corners, and with nobody out, Utley hits an RBI force out, forcing out Polanco at second base, who had earlier singled, as the inning’s first out, while scoring Victorino, who had earlier walked, then went to third on Polanco’s single. The Reds tried to break up the shutout in the bottom of the ninth, as they loaded up the bases via a double by Joey Votto, a walk by Jay Bruce, and then Miguel Cairo being hit by a pitch while behind in the count, sending Votto to third, and Bruce to second base, and with two men out, before Ryan Madson, who was pitching in relief of Cliff Lee, recorded his twenty-fifth save of the season as he ended the game by getting pinch htter Yonder Alonso to pop out to third to end the game.

Cliff Lee (15-7, 2.59) gets the win as he went eight and two-thirds shutout innings, giving up six hits and a walk, while striking out seven. Ryan Madson recorded his twenty-fifth save of the year as he pitched a third of an inning, getting out the only man that he would face. Dontrelle Willis (0-4, 4.10) took the last as he pitched six and two-thirds innings, giving up three runs on five hits and five walks, while striking out six. Jose Arredondo and Aroldis Chapman combined for two and a third scoreless innings, as they gave up just three hits (Arredondo (2), Chapman (1)), while striking out one batter (Chapman) between them.

The Phils had eight hits in the ballgame, with Carlos Ruiz leading the team with three hits, all singles. Placido Polanco followed with two hits, both singles. Hunter Pence (Home Run, RBI), John Mayberry, Jr. (Single) and Wilson Vladez (Single), had the other three Phils’ hits. Chase Utley and Ryan Howard knocked in the other two Phils’ runs with force outs.

The Phils (86-46, 1st East) will conclude their four-game series with the Reds (67-69, 3rd Central) with a day game later today. The game will be played at Great American Ball Park and will start at 12:35 pm EDT. The Phils will send to the mound Vance Worley (9-1, 2.65), who is coming off a win against the Mets on August 23, as he pitched seven innings, giving up a run on seven hits and a walk, while striking out nine, in the Phils’ 9-4 win. Worley will going for his tenth win of the season while also trying to lead the Phils to a sweep of the Reds. The Reds will counter with Mike Leake (11-8, 4.04), who is coming off a win against the Nats on August 27, as he went six innings, giving up two runs on six hits and a walk, while he struck out four, in the Reds’ 6-3 win. He will be trying to help the Reds avoid a sweep. The Phils will be out to sweep the Reds.

The NL announce that Cliff Lee was the Pitcher of the Month for June.

As expected, the National League announced that Cliff Lee was voted the National League Pitcher of the Month for the month of June. In five starts during the month, Lee went 5-0 with a 0.21 earned run average, as he gave up just an earned run in 42 innings pitched, including three consecutive complete game shutouts, as he also struck out 29 batters.

Congratulations, Cliff. Now let see if you have a better than normal month of July.

He’s bbbbbaaaaaccckkkkk!!!! Phils get back Cliff Lee!

In a move that came completely out of the blue, the Phils have just signed free agent Cliff Lee to a five-year, $120 million contract, with a vesting option for a sixth year, beating the New York Yankees, who had offered Lee a six-year deal worth $135 million, with a vesting option for a seventh year, and the Texas Rangers, who had offered him a six-year deal worth $138 million, and with a vesting option for a seventh season. With this move, Lee returns to Philadelphia, after having been traded by the Phils to the Seattle Mariners, almost a year ago, giving the Phils a starting rotation that now have four aces (Lee, NL Cy Young Award Roy Halladay, Roy Oswalt and Cole Hamels), that will be haunting the NL, especially the NL East, for at least a year (depending on whether Hamels will be resigned after the season, and if Oswalt decides not to retire after 2012.).

Lee, in 2010, as he pitched for first the Mariners, then the Rangers, went 12-9 with an ERA of 3.18, as he started in 28 games, pitching 212.1 innings, throwing seven complete games, including a shut out, as he struck out 185 batters, while walking only eighteen during the season. In the post-season, he helped pitched the Rangers into their first World Series appearance, before falling to the 2010 World Champions San Francisco Giants, as he went 3-2 overall for the Rangers.

The Phils will more than likely have to trade someone(s) to help them better afford their move. There is already rumors flying around that they have been trying to ship off Joe Blanton and or Raul Ibanez as a salary dump, with them willing to pay for part of Blanton’s salary to move him. I do not know if any of them is true, but, if they need to move someone, it should be Kyle Kendrick, not Blanton. After all, Blanton has been a bit more consistant, pitching wise, than has Kendrick, and he would be a lot better backup to the now Big Four than might Kendrick. Whatever does happen, I hope Ruben will know what he’s doing, although there does seem to be some method to his madness.

Doc Halladay has won the 2010 NL Cy Young Award, receiving all 32 first place votes.

The BBWAA have just announced that Roy Halladay was voted the National League Cy Young Award, becoming the fifth pitcher to win the award as a pitcher in both league, as he had won the award in 2003 while pitching for the Toronto Blue Jays, joining Hall of Famer Gaylord Perry, future Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez, future Hall of Famer Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens.

Roy received all 32 first-place votes for a total of 224 points, beating out Adam Wainwright of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had received 28 second-place votes, for a total of 122 votes, and Ubaldo Jiminez, who ended third with 90 votes, including 4 second-place votes.

Roy won the votes by going 21-10 as he pitched in 33 games, all starts, as he finished first, second or third in several categories, including finishing first with the most wins in the NL (21), most complete games (9), shutouts (4) and innings pitched (250 2/3), while he finished second in strikeouts (219), behind Tim Lincecum of the San Francisco Giants, and third in ERA (2.44), behind Josh Johnson of the Florida Marlins and Wainwright. He also pitched the 20th perfect game in MLB History as he threw a no-no against the Marlins on May 29, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami, as he pitched the Phils to a 1-0 win.

Halladay became the fourth Phil to win the award, following four-time winner Hall of Famer Steve Carlton (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982), John Denny (1983), and Steve Bedrosian (1987).

Congratulations, Doc. You deserve this win.

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 8: The Phillies finished in third place in the NL, inspite of losing their manager Harry Wright for most of the season as he goes blind.

The Phillies would start the 1890 season with a major problem. Before the season even starts, as they start to officially call themselves the Phillies, the club would lose several of its players to the teams of the Players’ League, including a new team that the rebellious league had set up in Philadelphia, the new Philadelphia Quakers. This new team would challenge not only the Phils but also the American Association’s Philadelphia franchise, the Philadelphia Athletics, to see which team would reign surpreme in the Philadelphia baseball world.

As the National League finds itself unable to destroy the upstart league through the courts, as New York Supreme Court Justice Morgan J. O’Brien rules on January 28 in favor of John Montgomery Ward, formerly a star pitcher for the New York Giants and now a Hall of Famer, in his reserve clause case against the league, they decide to destroy it on the playing field, despite losing half of the people who had played for National League teams the previous season before the start of the regular season. The league would set things up so that they would end up playing most of their games on the same day as would the teams of their Players’ League opponents, beginning with opening day, April 19.

The Phillies’ opponents for 1890 would include the two franchises that had joined the National League from the weakening American Association, after the previous season, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms and the Cincinnati Reds, replacing the now defunct Washington Nationals and Indianapolis Hoosiers franchises, along with the Beaneaters, the Giants, the Alleghenys, the Spiders and the Chicago franchise, which has before the season changed its nickname from the White Stockings to the Colts. Every member of the league, except for Cincinnati, would face a challenge from a Players’ League franchise, while only Brooklyn and Philadelphia would also face teams from the more friendly American Association. The Phillies would continue to play their home games at the Philadelphia Base Ball Grounds, while Harry Wright would begin his seventh season as the team’s manager, trying to see if he can finally pilot the team to a league pennant.

The Phillies would begin their season on the road in April, playing four games against the previous season’s champ, the Giants, and one game against the former American Association champ, the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would win the season opener behind Kid Gleason, defeating the Giants 4-0. They would then lose the next game, 5-3, before winning the four- games series, 3-1, by defeating New York by the scores of 7-3 and 3-1, and landing in a three-way tie for first place with the Beaneaters and the Alleghenys. The Phils would then lose their game with the Bridegrooms, 10-0, ending their road trip with a record of 3-2 and landing in third place, trailing the Beaneaters by a game. They would then go back home to begin an eleven-games home stand with their eastern rivals the Giants (3), the Beaneaters (4) and the Bridegrooms (4). The Phillies would end the month of April by splitting the first two of their three games with the Giants, ending the month with a record of 4-3 while in a three-way tie with the Bridegrooms and Beaneaters for second place, as they all trailed the now leading Colts by half-a-game.

With the start of May, the Phillies would conclude their series with the Giants, winning the final game, and thus winning the series, 3-1, as they would end up in a four-way tie for first place with the Beaneaters, the Colts and the Reds, all four teams a full game ahead of the Alleghenys and the Bridegrooms. The Phils would then sweep their series with the Beaneaters, putting themselves in first place, a game-and-a-half ahead of the second place Colts. The Phillies would then win their sixth game in a row as they would defeat the Bridegrooms in the first game of their four-games series, 6-1. The Phils would then lose their next two games with Brooklyn, before winning the last game of the home stand, and splitting the series 2-2, while winning their home stand, 8-3, still in first place, but now leading the Colts by two full games. The Phils then go to Boston for a one-game series, which they would lose, 14-7, before coming back home for a long twenty-four games series against all of their league opponents that would last the rest of May and the early part of June. The Phillies would begin the home stand by losing their three-games series with the Reds, 1-2, leaving them just a half-game ahead of the Colts, as their western rival come into Philadelphia for a four-games series. The Phils would win the series, 2-1-1, including a suspended final game which had the Colts leading 10-8, which would end up leaving the Phillies still in first place, a game-and-a-half ahead of the Colts, the Bridegrooms and the Giants. The Phils would next face the Alleghenys for four games. They would sweep the series, including a doubleheader sweep on May 28, winning the games by the scores of 12-10 and 7-2, which would leave them still a game-and-a-half ahead of Brooklyn. The Phils would then end the month playing four games with the Spiders, including their second doubleheader of the month, played on May 30. After winning the first game of the series, they would be swept in the doubleheader, losing the two games by the score of 8-4 and 4-1, before winning the final game of the series, thus ending up splitting their series with Cleveland, 2-2. The Phillies would end the month of May with a 17-8 record, and with an overall record of 21-11-1, a game-and-a-half ahead of both the Reds and the Bridegrooms.

The Phillies would start June by winning their series with the Beaneaters, 2-1 and then with the Bridegrooms, also 2-1, before sweeping their three-games series with the Giants, ending the home stand with a winning record of 17-7, leaving them in first, but now only a-half-game ahead of the Reds. The Phillies would then go on the road for seven games with Boston (4) and Brooklyn (3). The Phils would lose the first game in their series with the Beaneaters, 8-5, having their four-games winning streak snapped, before losing the series overall, 1-3. They would then get swept by the Bridegrooms, becoming mired in a five-games losing streak, as they fall into third place, five-and-a-half games behind the Reds. The Phillies would then go back home for a four-games home stand with the Alleghenys. The Phils would win the short home stand 3-1, still in third, but now trailing by three-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go on an eleven-games road trip to Cleveland (4), Chicago (4) and Cincinnati (3) for the rest of the month and the start of July. The Phils would go to Cleveland, winning the series there, 3-1, as they now stood in second place, still three-and-a-half games behind the Reds. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where they would lose the first game of their series with the Colts, thus ending the month with a 13-11-1 record, and an overall record of 34-22-1, falling back into third place, but still three-and-a-half games behind the Reds.

The Phillies would start July off by winning two of their next three games with the Colts, ending the series with a split, before going on to Cincinnati for their first visit to the Queen City on the Ohio. The Phils would win their first road series against the Reds, 2-1, which would include a doubleheader split on July 4th, winning the first game 11-2, and then losing the ‘nightcap’, 7-1, thus ending the road trip with a record of 7-4, still trailing the Reds by three-and-a-half games, tied for second with the Bridegrooms. The Phils would then go back home for a fifteen-games home stand against the Reds, the Spiders, the Alleghenys, the Colts and the Alleghenys again, for five three-games series. The Phillies would start the home stand by winning their series with the Reds, 2-1, leaving them now just two-and-a-half games behind the Reds, while staying in third place. They would then sweep the other four series in their home stand, thus ending the home stand with a 14-1 record, returning to first place, now leading the second place Bridegrooms by two-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go back on the road, for nine games with the Spiders (2), the Colts (3) and the Reds (4). The Phils would begin the road trip by sweeping the Spiders, increasing their winning streak to fifteen games, while increasing their lead over the Bridegrooms to three games. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where their winning streak would be snapped by the Colts, 12-4, before they ended the series losing it, 1-2, with their lead over Brooklyn shrinking down to two games. The Phillies would then go on to Cincinnati, where they promptly lost the first game of their four-games series to the Reds, ending the month with a 21-6 record and an overall record of 55-28-1, now leading the Bridegrooms by just a game-and-a-half.

The Phils would start the month of August by losing two of three to the Reds, thus losing the series, 1-3, and the road trip with a 4-5 record, now in second place and a game behind the Bridegrooms, as the pennant race starts to heat up. The Phillies would then go back home for a short three-games home stand against the Giants (2) and the Beaneaters (1). The Phils would split their short series with the Giants, 1-1, before losing their game with Boston, ending the homestand, 1-2 and now three games behind Brooklyn, as they remain in second place. The Phillies then go back onto the road for nine games with Boston (2), New York (3) and Brooklyn (4). The Phillies go into Boston, where they are swept by the Beaneaters, dropping them into third, still three games behind Brooklyn. The Phils then go to New York, where they would lose the series to the Giants, 1-2, leaving them four games behind the Bridegrooms, before going into Brooklyn. The Phillies would then fall further behind Brooklyn, as they would lose three of their four games with the Bridegrooms, including a doubleheader lost on the 20, by the lopsided scores of 13-2 and 12-7, ending the road trip with a 2-7 record, now six games behind the first place Bridegrooms, as they fall into fourth place. The Phillies would then return home for a long nineteen-games home stand against all of their opponents for four straight three-games series (Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Chicago and Cincinnati), two straight two-games series (Boston and New York) and then a final three-games series with Brooklyn. The Phils would start the home stand by redeeming themselves as they would proceed to sweep first the Alleghenys and then the Spiders, putting them back into third place, now three games behind Brooklyn. They then had a setback as they got swept in turn by the Colts, ending August with a losing record of 10-14, and an overall mark of 65-42-1, in a technical tie for third place with the Reds, six games behind the league leading Bridegrooms.

The Phillies would start September off by spliting a doubleheader with the Reds on the 1, winning the first game, 2-1 and then losing the ‘nightcap’, 8-5, before winning the third game of the series to win the series, 2-1. They would then split their two-games series with the Giants, which was a doubleheader split on the 3, losing the first game, 9-6, then winning the ‘nightcap’, 9-5, leaving them in third place, eight games behind the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would then be swept by the Beaneaters in their two-games series, leaving them now eight and a half games behind Brooklyn, still in third place, as the Bridegrooms come to Philadelphia for three-games, giving the Phils one last chance to make up ground on first place Brooklyn. The Phils would proceed to sweep the Bridegrooms, winning the three games by scores of 4-3, 13-6 and 9-3, ending the home stand with a record of 12-7, now trailing the Bridegrooms by five-and-a-half games. The Phillies would then go on the road for the final time, to play fifteen games in Boston (3), Cincinnati (4), Chicago (2), Pittsburgh (2) and Cleveland (4), for the rest of September and the start of October. The Phillies would start the road trip off by taking two of three from the Beaneaters, leaving them still five-and-a-half games behind Brooklyn and now a game behind the second place Beaneaters. The Philles would then lose three of four to the Reds, watching them stay in third place, six-and-a-half games behind Brooklyn, with only an outside chance to win the pennant. The Phils would then go to Chicago, where they would sweep the Colts, seeing them move up into second place over the Colts, six games behind the Bridegrooms. The Phillies would then go to Pittsburgh, where they would split the two-games series with the Alleghenys, losing the second game by the score of 10-1, thus ending the month with a record of 12-9 and an overall record of 77-51-1, now in third place, seven-and-a-half games behind the Bridegrooms, as Brooklyn clinches the pennant on that same day, September 30, by defeating the Spiders, 4-3 while the second place Colts would lose to the Beaneaters, 6-4.

The Phillies would end the season playing four games in October with the Spiders. After tying the first game, 2-2, they would win the next game, 5-4, before ending the season by being swept in an October 4 doubleheader, losing by the scores of 5-1 and 7-3, ending the month with a record of 1-2-1, the road trip with a record of 7-7-1, and ending the season with a record of 78-53-2, two-and-a-half games behind the second place Colts and nine games behind the league champ, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, so far the only Major League franchise to win a championship two years in a row in two difference leagues (AA 1889, NL 1890).

The Phillies would spend most of the year without their manager as Harry Wright would become blind on May 22. He would not be able to distinguish light from dark for ten days and would not return to manage the Phils until August 6. As Wright recovers, the Phillies would originally replace him with catcher Jack Clements, thus making him the fourth manager in Phillies’ history and the team’s second player-manager. Clements would be at the helm for only nineteen games, compling a record of 12-6-1 for a winning percentage of .667. Phillies co-owner, Al Reach, would replace him as the team’s fifth manager, leading the team for eleven games, compling a losing record of 4-7 for a winning percentage of .364. Reach then replaces himself as the team’s manager with shortstop Bob Allen, making him the team’s sixth manager and the third player-manager in franchise’s history. Allen would remain the team’s leader until Wright’s return, compling a record of 25-10 in thirty-five games, for a winning percentage of .714. Wright would return on August 6, leading the team during the final two-plus months of the pennant race, leading the Phils to its third third place finish, as he compiled a record of 36-31-1 in sixty-eight games, for a winning percentage of .537.

The Phillies would end up playing a total of 133 games, with a home/road split of 54-21-1 at home and 24-32-1 on the road, as 148,366 fans would come to watch them play at home. They would face the Spiders, the Reds and the Beaneaters twenty times each, the Colts and the Allghenys nineteen times, the Bridegrooms eighteen times and the Giants only seventeen times. The Phillies had winning records against four of their opponents, with their best record being against the Alleghenys, as they would go 17-2, followed by the Spiders at 14-5-1. They would have losing records with three teams, with their worst record being against the Bridegrooms, as they went 8-10, followed by both the Beaneaters and the Reds at 9-11. The Phillies would be 9-3 in shut outs, 17-9 in 1-run games and 30-17 in blowouts.

During the season, the Phillies would be either at the top, or near the top, in most offensive categories. The team would be first in doubles (220), batting average (.269) and on-base percentage (.342), second in hits (1267), walks (522), slugging percentage (.364) and stolen bases (335), third in run scored (823) and triples (78), fifth in at-bats (4707), sixth in home runs (23) and strikeouts (403), while also knocking in 631 RBIs, while 64 batters would be hit by the pitch. Meanwhile, the pitchers would also be near the top in most categories. They would be second in saves (2), shut outs (9), innings pitched (1194), home runs allowed (22) and strikeouts (507), fifth in complete games (122), and sixth in ERA (3.32), hits allowed (1210), runs allowed (707), and walks (486), as well as start 133 games, complete eleven games, allowed 440 earned runs, throw 45 wild pitches and commit two balks.

Team offensive leaders for the season would include Billy Hamilton in batting average (.325), on-base percentage (.430), runs scored (133), stolen bases (102), also leading the league in that category, and singles (137), being tied for the league lead with Cliff Carroll of the Chicago Colts. Clements would lead the team in slugging percentage (.472) and home runs (7). Allen would lead in games played (133), walks (87) and strikeouts (54), while being tied with Eddie Burke for triples with 11 each. Sam Thompson would be the team leader in at-bats (549), total plate appearances (599), hits (172), tied for the league lead with Jack Glasscock of the New York Giants, total bases (243), doubles (41), being the league leader, RBIs (102) and extra-base hits (54). Al Myers would lead in hit by the bat by being plunked 10 times.

Pitching wise, 1890 would be the coming out year for Kid Gleason, as he would be the team leader in most pitching categories. He would have the lowest ERA (2.63), win the most games (38, which is still the team’s single season record), highest win-lost percentage (.691), game played (60), saves (2), tied for the lead in that category with Dave Foutz of the Brooklyn Bridegrooms and Bill Hutchison of the Chicago Colts, innings pitched (506), strikeouts (222), games started (55), complete games (54), games finished (5), shutouts (6), hits allowed (479), earned runs allowed (148), while being tied with Tom Vickery for the team lead in home runs allowed (6). Vickery would also lead the team in walks (184), losses (22) and wild pitches (23). The Phils would only have two pitchers who would win twenty or more games, Gleason, setting a club record 38 wins and Vickery with 24.

As the Phillies continue to try to claim their first pennant, the National League Champ, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, would face the American Association Champ, the Louisville Colonels in a seven-games post-season series, that would end up as a 3-3-1 tie between the two teams. Meanwhile, the Players’ League folds, as the league’s idea of having a revenue sharing-pool between the players would backfire, as the owners of the league’s eight teams are unable to make enough of a profit to stay in business. This would force the owners to sell the interest of their teams to the owners of the National League, who would in the process regain many of the players that they had lost to the revolt, such as the Phillies regaining Ed Delahanty from the Cleveland Infants. Meanwhile, as the Players’ League dies, the American Association would kick the Athletics out of the fold, for violating the league’s constitution. The Athletics would then be replaced in the AA by the Quakers of the Players’ League, leaving the Phillies with a rival. Noone, however, would have any idea how damaging the players’ revolt would be to the AA until 1891.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com, Baseball-reference.org, Retrosheet.org

Philadelphia Phillies – Year 7: Dropping back down to fourth place.

The Phillies would begin their seventh year of existance trying to rebound from the previous season drop in the standings, as their manager, Harry Wright, would begin his sixth season as the Phillies’ skipper.

As the Phillies continue to play their home games in their home ballpark, the Philadelphia Base Ball Grounds, change is in the air in the National League as the league would be in a constant state of flux that will last the next several years. Early in the 1888 off-season, the Detroit Wolverine franchise would fold, it place in the National League to be taken by the American Association Cleveland Blues, who would soon change their name to the Cleveland Spiders. The league would then adopt a five-tier salary structure which would help to determine how much each player is paid. This move by the owners would have repercussions within two years, as it would lead to the Players’ revolt of 1890. Early in 1889, the National League would take control of the debt-ridden Indianapolis Hoosiers before an ownership group would finally take contol of the franchise. The Phillies’ opponents for the new season, besides the new Spiders and the Hoosiers, under new management, would be the Beaneaters, the Giants, the Nationals, the Alleghenys, and the White Stockings.

The Phillies would begin the 1889 regular season on Wednesday, April 24, against the Nationals in Washington, which the Phillies would win, 8-4, putting them in a tie for first place with the Beaneaters, the Hoosiers and the Alleghenys. The Phillies would then go home for a twenty-eight games home stand against all of their rivals, where they would play four straight four-games series with the Beaneaters, the Giants, the Nationals, the White Stockings, a two-games series with the Hoosiers, two straight four-games series with the Spiders and the Alleghenys and finally a second two-games series with the Hoosiers, which would last through the entire month of May. The Phillies would end April by splitting the first two games of their four-games series with the Beaneaters, losing 8-3, and then winning 7-6, ending April with a 2-1 record, in third place, trailing both the Giants and the Alleghenys by half a game.

The Phillies would begin May the same way they had ended April, by splitting the last two games of their four-games series with Boston, ending the series with a 2-2 record, while staying in third place as they now trailed the first place Giants by a game and a half. In their four-game series with their rival, the Giants, the Phillies would take three of the four games, including 9-4 and 11-2 victories in the first two games of the series, before being clobbered 13-9 in the series’ third game, putting them in a first place tie with the Beaneaters, half a game ahead of both the now third place Giants and the fourth place Alleghenys. The Phils would then proceed to split their series with the Nationals, which would keep them tied with Boston for first and still half a game ahead of the Giants. The Phils would then win their four-games series with their main western rival, the White Stockings, 3-1, as they fall into second place in the standings, a full game behind the first place Beaneaters. They would then sweep their two games with the Hoosiers, which keep them a game behind Boston in the standings. They would then win the first game of their four-games with the Spiders, giving them a five-games winning streak, before they would lose the next three games, thus losing the series to Cleveland, 1-3, as they fall three and a half games behind Boston, while staying in second place. The Phillies would then rebound, winning the first three games in their four-games series with the Alleghenys, including a doubleheader split on May 30, winning the opener by the score of 13-6, before losing the ‘nightcap’ by the score of 10-6. They would then sweep their second straight doubleheader, this one against the Hoosiers on May 31, by the scores of 11-8 and 11-4, thus ending the home stand with a record of 18-10 and the month with a 17-9 record. Their overall record of 19-10 would keep them in second place, now two and a half games behind the first place Beaneaters.

The Phillies would start off June by playing a four-games series with first place Beaneaters in Boston. The series would be a disaster, as they would lose the first three games in the series by scores of 7-2, 10-6 and 4-2, before leaving Boston with a 5-4 win, which would put the still second place Phils behind Boston by four and a half games. The Phillies would next play two straight three-games series with the Nationals, with the first three to be played in Philadelphia, and then the latter three in Washington, as part of a six-cities, twenty-two-games road trip to New York (2), Chicago (4), Cleveland (4), Pittsburgh (5) and Indianapolis (4), that would take the balance of June and the start of July to complete. The Phillies would win both of their series against the Nationals, going 2-1 both at home and in Washington, which would include a split of their third doubleheader of the season, losing the first game 6-3, and then winning the ‘nightcap’ 7-5. The Phillies would drop down to third place as they head for New York, a game behind the third place Spiders and three and a half games behind league leading Boston. The Phils would end up being swept in New York, which would drop them five and a half games behind the Beaneaters. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where they would split their four-games series with the White Stockings, as they would now trail Boston by eight games, as the Beaneaters would appear to be running away from the rest of the league. The Phillies would next go to Cleveland, visiting the city for the first time since the collapse of the original Cleveland Blues franchise in 1884. The Phillies would end up losing the series to the Spiders, 1-3, which would dropped the Phils into fourth place, still trailing the Beaneaters by eight games, as the Giants would jump over them into third place. The Phils would then go to Pittsburgh, where their losing streak would increase to four games, including a doubleheader lost on June 29 by the score of 3-2 and 8-0. The Phillies would end June with an 8-15 losing record, and an overall record of 27-25, eight and a half games behind Boston in fourth place.

The Phillies would start July by losing the last two games of their series with Pittsburgh, losing the five-games series as their losing streak rises to six games, as they now trail Boston by nine and a half games. The Phillies would finally break their losing streak by winning the first game of their July 4th doubleheader with the Hoosiers, winning by the score of 5-4, before losing the ‘nightcap’ 6-0. They would then split the last two games in Indianapolis, splitting the series, as they would end the road trip with a losing record of 7-15, as they now trailed Boston by nine games, as they stayed a half game ahead of fifth place Chicago. The Phillies would then go back home to begin a seventeen-games home stand with the Hoosiers (3), White Stockings (2), the Spiders (3), the Alleghenys (3), the Giants (3) and the first place Beaneaters (3). The Phillies would start the home stand off with a seven-games winning streak as they would sweep first the Hoosiers, then the White Stockings, before the Spiders would finally end the winning streak by beating the Phils in the final game of their three-games series, 9-4. Their seven games winning streak would place the Phillies six games behind the Beaneaters, before their lost and Boston’s doubleheader sweep of the Hoosiers the next day would push them back to seven and a half games behind. The Phillies would then sweep their series with Pittsburgh and New York, which would put them four and a half game behind Boston as the Beaneaters came to town. The Phillies would proceed to lose the first two games with Boston, thus losing the series, 1-2, as they now trail the first place Beaneaters by five and a half games, as they moved into third place, a half game ahead of the Spiders and two games behind New York, as they end the home stand with a record of 14-3. The Phillies would then go back onto the road for a six-cities, thirteen-games road trip to Boston (2), New York (2), Pittsburgh (2), Cleveland (2), Chicago (3) and Indianapolis (2). The Phillies would start their road trip in Boston, where they would be swept by the Beaneaters, ending the month with a 16-9 record and with an overall record of 43-34, seven and a half games behind Boston, and tied for third place with Cleveland (who have played one game more than the Phils, which ended up as a tie.).

The Phillies would begin August still on the road as they visit rival New York, where they would be swept by the Giants as their losing streak rises to four games, as they fall to eight games behind, technically in third place as they lead the Spiders by .001. The Phillies would then sweep their series with the Alleghenys, before splitting their series with the Spiders, as they now trailed the Beaneaters by six and a half games, while in third place by themselves. The Phillies would then go to Chicago, where they would win the series with their western rival, 2-1, before heading on to Indianapolis, where they would split the series with the Hoosiers, ending the road trip with a respectible 6-7 record, seven games behind the Beaneaters, who were now trying to fight off a challenge for first from the Giants. The Phillies then went home for a short three-games series with the Nationals, which the Phillies would win, 2-1, as they now trailed Boston by seven and a half games. The Phillies then went back onto the road for a five-games series in New York, which they would lose to the Giants, 1-4, as they played two straight doubleheaders with them, splitting the first one on August 23, losing the first game, 7-3, before winning the ‘nightcap’ 11-2. They would then be swept in the doubleheader played on the 24, by the scores of 10-8 and 8-3. The Phils would stay in third place, but now trailing Boston by nine and a half games. They would then go home to face the Beaneaters for three games, seeing their losing streak go up to four games, before finally winning the series’ final game, as they lose the series, 1-2, as the Phillies now trailed the Beaneaters by ten and a half games. The Phillies then go back onto the road for three games with the Nationals, where they would lose the series, 0-1-1, tying the series’ middle game by the score of 2-2, as they would end the month with a record of 10-14-1, while having an overall record of 53-48-1, eleven and a half game behind Boston, and a half-game ahead of fourth place Chicago.

In September, the Phils would play a ten-games home stand with the White Stockings (4), the Spiders (3), the Alleghenys (1) and the Hoosiers (2). The Phillies would lose the series with their western rival, the White Stockings, 1-3, which would include a doubleheader split on the 2, losing the first game, 2-1, before winning the ‘nightcap’ 3-2. The series would see the Phillies drop back into fourth place, now twelve and a half games behind both Boston and New York, who were in a mathematical tie for first place, and a game and a half behind now third place Chicago. The Phils would then go on a five-games winning streak, sweeping their series with the Spiders, and then winning their one-game series with the Alleghenys, before splitting their doubleheader with the Hoosiers on the 14, winning the opener, 11-3, then losing the second game, 10-7, thus ending their home stand with a 6-4 record, as they regained third place, now twelve games behind Boston and three and a half games ahead of the fourth place White Stockings. The Phillies would then go to Boston for a three games series, which they would lose to the Beaneaters, 1-2, leaving them still twelve games behind the Beaneaters and the Giants, with the Giants leading by .003. The Phillies then went back home for a five-games series with the Giants, which they would lose 0-4-1, which would include a doubleheader split on the 20, as they would lose the first game, 5-1, then would be tied in the ‘nightcap’, 4-4. The Phillies were now sixteen and a half games behind the Giants, who were now a game ahead of Boston in the pennant race. The Phillies would now go onto the road for the rest of the season, to play eleven games in four cities, with three games in Cleveland, three in Pittsburgh, two in Indianapolis and the final three games of the season in Chicago. The Phillies would win the series in Cleveland, going 2-1, as they now trailed the Giants by seventeen and a half games. The Phils would then go to Pittsburgh, where they would be swept by the Alleghenys, ending the month of September with an 8-14-1 record, while their overall record went to 61-62-2, placing them in a mathematical tie with the White Stockings for third place.

In October, the Phillies would start the month off with a sweep of the Hoosiers, placing them a half game ahead of Chicago as the two teams now fought over third place, while the Phils now trailed both New York and Boston by eighteen games, as those two teams fought for the league’s crown. The Phillies would go to Chicago, and would end the first game in their three-games series in a 5-5 tie. They would then lose the final two games of the season to the White Stockings, ending the month with a record of 2-2-1, while their road trip would end with a record of 4-6-1, as they end the season in fourth place with a record of 63-64-3, a winning percentage of .496, a game and a half behind third place Chicago and twenty and a half games behind the league’s winner, the New York Giants, who would win the pennant on the last day of the regualr season.

The Phillies would play 130 games, with a home-road record of 43-24-1 at home and 20-40-2 on the road. They would play in front of 281,869 fans at home. They would have winning records with only three teams, with their best record being 13-4 against the Hoosiers, while also having losing records against three teams, with their worst being against the Beaneaters at 6-13. They would also have a 9-9 record with the Alleghenys. The Phillies would be 4-10 in shut outs, 17-13 in one-run games, and 21-24 in blowouts.

Offensively, they would end up being around the middle of the pack, ending up second in 2Bs (215), third in stolen bases (269), fourth in at-bats (4695), home runs (44) and batting average (.266), fifth in runs scored (742), hits (1248), on-base percentage (.323) and slugging percentage (.362), seventh in triples (52) and walks (393) and eighth in strike outs (353), as well as knocking in 605 RBIs, while 35 batters were hit by the pitch. Among pitching staffs, the Phils would also be near the middle of the league, as they would lead the league in home runs given up with 33, be third in saves (2) and strikeouts (443), fourth in runs allowed (748), fifth in ERA (4.00), innings pitched (1153), hits allowed (1288) and walks (428), sixth in shut outs (4), and eighth in complete games (106), while finishing twenty-four other games, giving up 512 earned runs, forty-seven wild pitches, and hitting twenty-seven batters.

Among the batters, Sam Thompson would lead the team in batting average (.296), slugging percentage (.492), total plate appearances (575), hits (158), total bases (262), doubles (36), home runs (20), where he was the league leader and RBIs (111), while Jim Fogarty would lead in on-base percentage (.352), runs scored (107), triples (17), walks (65), strikeouts (60), stolen bases (99), also leading the league in that category and hit by the pitch (7), Sid Farrar in games played (130), and Joe Mulvey in at-bats (544) and singles (121). Among the pitchers, Charlie Buffington would lead the pitching staff in ERA (3.24), wins (28), winning percentage (.636), games pitched (47), games started (43), complete games (37), shutouts (2), innings pitched (280), home runs allowed (10), walks (121), wild pitches (15) and batters faced (1661), while Kid Gleason and Ben Sanders would be tied for first with one save each, Sanders would also lead in hits allowed (406), losses (18) and earned runs allowed (138), and Gleason would lead in hit batters (9) and games finished (7). The Phillies would have only one twenty-game winner in 1889, Charlie Buffington, who would go 28-16, as Ben Sanders would just miss it, as he would go 19-18.

With the 1889 season over, the Phillies would have their first losing season since 1884, although staying in the first division for the fifth straight season under Harry Wright’s tenure. As the Phillies once again try to figure out what they would need to do to finally win a pennant, the Giants would face the Brooklyn Bridegrooms of the American Association in a post-season playoff, which the Giants would win 6-3, beginning what would become a long standing rivalry between the two clubs, as Brooklyn would join the National League for the following season, along with the Cincinnati Red Stockings (now the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Cincinnati Reds, respectively), as they would replace the just folded Nationals and Hoosiers franchises. Meanwhile, the Brotherhood of Professional Base Ball Players, the players’ union, still upset over the restructuring of the players’ salary structure, would formally revolt against the owners with the formation of the Players’ League on December 16. The players’ revolt would within two years have an outcome not expected by any of the players who would join any of the teams in the new league or those who would remain in either the NL or AA, or among the teams’ owners.

Sources: Wikipedia, Baseball Almanac.com, Retrosheet.org, Baseball-reference.com

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